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VOL. XVII., No. 1 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, JANUARY, 1921 



■UBScRmnoif price mc canada{pJ cH^. w 'cmm 



Live Stock 



for Princess Ranch 

No stock is too good for his Alberta ranch, accord- 
ing to the Prince of Wales, who has been sending 
OTer Dartmoor ponies, thoroughbred colts and 
fillies, and Suffolk chickens. 

The Prince's enthusiasm will make other ranchers 
keen to have equally fine stock. 

Our managers will be glad to discuss your farm 
financing with you. 



As the pioneer Bank of Western Canada we 
are bankers for the United Grain Growers, 
the United Fanners of Alberta, and the 
Saskatchewan Co-operative Elevator Company. 

UNION BANK OF CANADA 



456 



HEAD OFFICE 



WINNIPEG 



YOU CAN 

Fire Premiums 50/1 

Our Hardware Companies have returned 60% of the premium 
paid (based on board rates) to United States Hardware and Imple- 
ment policy holders since 1908. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK. MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life Bldg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 
INSURANCE IN FORCE OVER $218,000,000.00 

NET CASH SURPLUS OVER $ 1,800.000.00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOMINION OP CANADA $ 150,000.00 

REFERENCX: BANK OF MONTREAL. WINNIPEG 



Watson's Hardwood Frame 
Wood and Pole Saws 



Our saws 
bearings. 



haye solid 
Hardwood 




steel shafts and high grade babbitted 
frame is strongly built and rigidly 
braced. Heavy, solid balanced fly- 
wheel and three 5z6-in. pulleys. 
Complete saw mandrels supplied 
separately if desired, also blades in 
all sizes. Lay in a stock now. 





WATSON'S BOSS WOOD HARROWS 

These Han-ows are made of seasoned hardwood- Each tooth securely set by two 
rivets. Fitted with malleable draw clevis. They are harrows of correct design 
Have exclusive features. Easy seUers. Sizes: 78 Tooth, 14 feet; 102 Tooth, 17 
fyfeet; 150 Tooth, 24 feet; 174 Tooth, 30 feet; 222 
Tooth, 38 feet. Send us your orders. 



We carry repairs for Moline Plows, Disc 
Harrows, Wagons and Drills, also for 
Janesville Plows and Disc Harrows. 



311 CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



FITTED PLOW SHARES 




Share* Stocked at Regina for every make of Plow 

PLACE YOUR ORDER TO-DAY 



HARROW TEETH 
EVENER WOODS 



PAINTED AND VARNISHED 
PLOW HITCHES WAGON SETS 



CHRISTIANSEN IMPLEMENTS 
Land Packers, Mulchers, and Plow Harrows 

The House of Quality We Ship Daily 

Write for Latest Catalogue 

Western Implements Limited 



1434 Broad Street North 



Regina, Sask. 



Start the New Year Well 

by joining the vast and ever increasing multitude of tliose 
who find in Life Insurance the one sure way of protecting 
dependent ones — while making timely provision for their 
own future at the same time. 

Join the ever increasing number who have found, in the 
Policies of The Great-West Life Assurance Company, all that 
can be desired in profitable Life Insurance. 

Thus you will obtain protection at low cost, and will secure 
a share in the remarkable profits that are being paid to 
Policyholders of 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

DEPT. "P 16" 
HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG 

In requesting information ask for a Desk Calendar for 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 




Sell Jumbo Engines, Feed Mills, Pump Jacks 



Profit by Helping Farmers 




Points of Jumbo Superiority 

Perfect Mixer 

A specially designed mixer gives a perfect, uniform 
fuel supply with either kerosene or gasoline. 

Oacillating Magneto 

Webster oscillating magneto gives a hot fat spark in 
all kinds of v^eather. 

Easy Starting 

Positive fuel supply and perfect ignition make quick 
starting easy and sure. 

Poaitioe Governor 

Positive governor gives even speed under all loads. 
More power when needed and then only, saves fuel. 

Sub-Base Fuel Tank 

The fuel tank is cast in the sub-base, eliminating 
any possibility of explosions or fuel loss by leakage. 

Auxiliary Valve 

An auxiliary valve does away with the fuel pump 
and keeps plenty of fuel in the mixer. 



Get Ready for Spring 

Now is the time for farmers to make repairs and 
improvements and get ready for the rush of 
spring and summer work. Show them how to rig 
up a repair shop. A few feet of line shaft and 
belt, some hangers and pulleys, a drill press, ail 
emery wheel and a Jumbo engine to drive them 
make valuable repair equipment. 

Help the farmer to plan his shop and then sell 
him all the equipment. You will profit on the 
sale in cash and in the good will which brings 
future business. Jumbo engines will do all the 
farmers* odd jobs— pumping water, grinding feed, 
cutting wood, running a dynamo and separator- 
supplying portable power when needed. IH to 
12 H.P. 

Write for full information on Jumbo 
Engines and how we help you to sell them 



NELSON BROTHERS COMPANY 

SAGINA Makert of the Famous Line of Jumbo Motor Trucks MICHIGAN^ UmSAm 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3 




Look For The 

EAGLE 
Our Trade Mark 



|CASt-ON TOP MNQ 1M7| 




Opens the Road to Success 



DEALERS who are awake to the sale and good-will 
value of honestly built power farming machinery 
with a reputation for satisfaction over a period of 
79 years, contract for the sale of Case machinery as their 
principal line for 1921. 

Every farmer who is cultivating a profitable acreage is a propect 
for a Case tractor. Most farmers who now have a tractor are pros- 
pects for a Case galvanized steel-built thresher, hay baler, silo filler. 
Grand Detour plow or tandem disc harrow. 

Every thresherman who needs a new outfit is a live prospect "fer 
a Case steam or kerosene tractor and threshing machine. 

State Highway Departments, County Commissioners, Street 
Committees of Municipalities, and Road Building Contractors are 
potential purchasers of Case tractors (either kerosene or steam), road 
graders, rock crushers or steam rollers. Case prospects are everywhere. 

Case sales run into big money, and every Case sale lays the 
foundation for future Case sales. If you are a dealer who believes in 
service to the purchaser, not only for the profit that's in it, but also 
for the sake of service, we suggest you investigate the Case way that 
will open your road to success. 

J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company 
Dept. A 216 Racine, Wisconsin 




"NOTICE; We want the public to know' 
'that our plows and harrows are not the' 
Case Plows and harrows made by th& 
J. I. Case Plow Works Co. " 



4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1920 




A Big Winter Money Maker 

NELSON HEATER 



EVERY FARMER needs one. Stock fattens quicker and 
dairy herds produce more milk on warmed drinking water. 
In winter live stock usually get more dry feed than in the 
warmer months, and therefore need more water to moisten 
the food and facilitate digestion. Stock will not drink the 
water they should when the water is almost at freezing temper- 
ature — therefore, from the standpoint of feed economy and 
healthful condition of the animals, a Nelson Tank Heater is 
necessary farm equipment. Keeps water at 70 degrees. Burns 
straw, cobs, rubbish, wood or coal. Every one guaranteed. 
150,000 satisfied users. Many superior selling features. Carry 
a good stock and prepare for a big season. 

Address nearest branch of the 

Metal Shingle & Siding Company, Ltd. 

Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary Preston Montreal and Toronto 

HUDSON MFG. COMPANY - Minneapolis, Minn. 




Engines Sold Here" 

The day that sign goes over your door the' fact that you 
sell farm engines will have an added significance to your trade. 
Because farmers everywhere have come to know the Webster as 
the most unfailingly dependable magneto. Over 600,000 of these 
magnetos are to-day rendering unusual service all over the country. 

The dealer who sells a line of engines equipped with the 
Webster makes his sales with less effort, and his engines STAY 
SOLD. For it is a well known fact that 90% of all engine 
troubles are due to .faulty ignition. 

Fortify yourself against "come backs" due to poor ignition. 
Stock a Webster-equipped line. 85% of the manufacturers of 
farm engines using make-and-break ignition now supply the 
Webster as Standard equipment. 



R ACINE. WISCONSIN. U. S.A. 



We can supply 
independent 
beam plows in 
5, 6, 8 and 10 
furrow sizes, 
also a full line 
of Tractor Disc 
Plows, Drills 
Harrows, etc. 



Cockshutt Tractor 
Plows 




Built in 2, 3 and 
4 Furrow sizes, 
with Stubble 
or Breaker 
Boards. 12" or 
14" Bottoms. 
Ask for special 
folder. 



The easiest sold line of Plows in Western Canada. Their repvitation for splendid work in 
any soil and with any make of tractor make them the best "self-sellers" you ever handled. 



The Cockshutt is a plow specially designed by experts 
for Tractor plowing. Has heavy beams, heavy braces and 
substantial construction all through yet it's surprisingly 
light in draft. This is due largely to the correct design 
of the bottoms— they turn clean cut furrows. Two 



easily reached and readily operated levers set the plow 
for its work. Can be hitched to any make of tractor. 
Adjustments up and down as well as sideways, are 
provided. A plow that "stays sold" and makes firm 
friends for you with your customers. 



This is one of the most popular of a complete line of Cockshutt-Frost & Wood Implements. 
Backed constantly by generous advertising and dealer service. Write our nearest Branch OfKce. 

Cockshutt Plow Company, 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



Vol. XVII., No 1 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, JANUARY, 1921 



„ „ / Per Year. $1.00 

Subscription Peicb in Canada \ pg, Copy. lOc 



Increasing Volume in Farm Engine Business 



At the present time there 
seems to be a hesitancy on the 
part of some dealers to push 
stationary engines. This may 
arise from the thought that the 
tractor will put the stationary 
engine out of business, or is pos- 
sibly due to the competition of 
mail order concerns in this side 
of the business. While the trac- 
tor is invaluable for belt work, 
the time will never come when 
the tractor will be used for doing 
such work as running a washing 
machine, lighting plant, cream 
separator or churn. 

The farmer does not consider 
if his wife washes on Monday, if 
on that day he wants to use 'the 
tractor in the fields. Nor will he 
stop plowing with the tractor to 
pump water. In short, the farm- 
er is not going to put his tractor 
to work where a small stationary 
engine can be just as useful and 
more economical. Where real 
heavy belt work is needed the 
tractor will be used, but for all 
other farm power requirements 
the stationary or portable gas en- 
gine will be employed. 

Engine Sales and New Business 

The gas engine opens a new 
field for the sale of power ma- 
chinery. The farmer buys an en- 
gine with a view to saving 
physical labor and reducing the 
cost of hired help. When he has 
the engine he will want to use it 
for as many jobs as possible. He 
will want a power feed grinder, a 
fanning mill, a power washer and 
a pump jack or two. It will not 
be a hard matter to induce him to 
consider an electric lighting plant 
so long as he has the power to 
run it. 

At this season of the year the 
dealer should make a special drive 
for engine business. The farmer 
in spring wants his help -in the 
field, and these days hired help 
is too expensive to use for doing 
chores. In the fall an engine will 
allow him to dispense with some 
of his help. 

To sell gas engines the dealer 
should know the engine from bed 
plate to combustion chamber. If 
he does not he should have a man 
who has an interest in engines, 



who is mechanically inclined and 
who likes to analyse engine com- 
plaints. In short, an engine en- 
thusiast in the dealer's business 
is a valuable factor. Whether 
this is the dealer himself or one 
of his clerks, such a man will cost 
little compared with the profit 
that he can produce. 

It is too often contended that 
the dealer can't meet mail order 
competition in the engine busi- 
ness. • It is true that this type of 
engine offers price inducements, 
but there are engines, plenty of 
them, which the engine dealer can 
sell on the basis of mechanical 
quality. 

The Choice of a Line 

The dealer not only wants an 
engine of quality, but he wants 
one that is well advertised, and 
which accordingly is well known. 
In other words, he doesn't want 
to have to pay the full expense of 
pioneering in his territory. He 
wants an engine also on which he 
can control all the territory he 
can work. He doesn't want an 
engine that is sold in every town 
around him, for unless all the 
dealers in that particular terri- 
tory are of the same mind, it may 
be hard to keep up the price and 
for all to conform to the same 
ideas of engine service. Get a 
good engine, get all the territory 
that can profitably be handled — 
not any more — and then get out 
and talk quality and get the busi- 
ness. 

The sales may come slowly at 
first. There may be engines of all 
kinds and descriptions sold all 
around such a dealer. But every 
sale this dealer makes is a good 
one, a profitable one, and is made 
to a satisfied customer. A dealer 
can promote more sales through 
a satisfied customer than he could 
hope to make by competition in 
price. Let the farmers know that 
your engine costs a little more 
than any other. 

Watch that price question. 
Don't balk on it. Say your en- 
gine costs more but is worth 
more. That sets them thinking. 
They wonder how you could get 
away with the price unless the 
quality is there; they become in- 



terested. Before you know it 
they have inquired from some of 
your customers about the engine 
they bought from you and they 
are ready for you to place another 
engine in your territory. 

Quality Always Pays 

The writer talked recently to a 
firm in Saskatchewan who had 
made a phenomenal success of 
the engine business. In review- 
ing the engine business, one of 
the two dealers in this concern 
said : "When we started to sell en- 
gines we were 'leary' of some of 
the cheap engines being sold. We 
had a reputation to consider, and 
did not want to damage it by 
selling an engine that would not 
give complete satisfaction. |So 
we decided to handle a real en- 
gine and make our sales on the 
basis of quality rather than on the 
basis of a competitive price. We 

took on the X engine, and 

for the first year sold only a few. 
Farmers thought the price too 
high, as a general rule, but we 
hung onto the ideal of engine 
quality. In a short time we began 
to notice that some of the engines 
being sold by our opposition were 
having trouble. Complaints came 
in, and the service expense must 
have been heavy. All the while 
our line, as we sold it, ran right 
along and gave no trouble, and 
we soon found that our engine de- 
mand had doubled. Now we 
have an established reputation in 
this territory for our line of en- 
gines, and 'we have proved that 
the cheap engine is a poor adver- 
tisement for the dealer. We are 
convinced that in engine trade it 
pays to get the agency for a good 
line and to stick to it. Quality 
pays, and eventually the quality 
engine will win out." 

Fifty miles away, in a small 
town, we ran across another en- 
gine enthusiast. When the 
farmer approaches the place of 
business of this dealer he is up 
against engines right away. He 
finds a show window with an en- 
gine belted to a grain grinder. 
Inside he finds engines on the 
floor. In fact engines are every- 
where, but do not monopolize the 
space. This dealer shows en- 



gines, cream separators and pump 
jacks. He has a line shaft by 
which any kind of power ma- 
chinery can be operated. We 
noticed a lighting plant and a 
fanning mill belted up to the 
shaft. 

One of the principles this dealer 
employs in keeping engines mov- 
ing is to italk engines all the 
time. He does not contend that 
sales come that way, but he im- 
presses engines on the mentahty 
of the customer. On every occa- 
sion he shows the customer a cer- 
tain size engine, which he thinks 
is the proper size for that farmer 
to have, then talks up its good 
points. Soon the farmer will in- 
quire the price. The farmer 
probably will say the price is too 
high for him, and that gives the 
dealer an opening for his quality 
talk. 

The dealer need not hesitate in 
handling stationary or portable 
gas engines. The demand is 
as good as ever. The practic- 
ability of a reliable engine has 
been established beyond the faint- 
est shadow of a doubt. The trac- 
tor can't replace the small engine. 
It takes but a small amount of 
capital to get started in this line, 
it doesn't take a vast amount of 
technical knowledge, and the pro- 
fits are worth striving for. 

In the quest for profitable 
business do not overlook the sale 
of a quality line of engines. Pro- 
fits are there in plain sight. Leave 
it to the internal combustion en- 
gine to "combust" some of the 
fallacies about there not being 
profits in the implement business. 
Leave it to the engine to put the 
necessary power in your business 
to bring the proper and legiti- 
mate returns. 



Factors Affecting the Farm 
Equipment Industry 



In recent addresses to 'the con- 
ventions of the implement dealers' 
associations in Indiana and Michi- 
gan. Floyd R. Todd, Vice- 
president of Deere & Co., Moline, 
111., gave some interesting com- 
ment? on the present situation 
in the industry. He said in part : 

"There are a great many items 



6. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



which 'the farmer requires for his 
daily needs that are very much 
higher in price, as compared to 
1914, than farm products, but 
when it comes to implements 
there is not a great discrepancy. 

"In order that I might properly 
analyze the increase in the' price 
of implements, I have taken our 
entire year's sales, including re- 
pairs, during the year 1916 and 
figured them at the prices main- 
taining at the opening of that 
year, which were the same as pre- 
war prices. Then I have taken 
the same number of goods and 
repairs and fiigured them at the 
price that we are charging for 
the spring of 1921. This shows 
an increase in price of 92 per cent. 

"While it is true that this per- 
centage is somewhat higher than 
the percentage increase in the 
value of the products of the farm, 
listed above, it must be borne in 
mind that wheat went from. 80 
cents a bushel in July, 1914, just 
before the war broke out, to $2.00 
a bushel in 1916, before imple- 
ments were advanced at all to the 
farmer. 

"During this period of time the 
increased cost of wheat and other 
food and clothing products raised 
upon the farm, was finding its 
way through wholesale and retail 
channels to the final consumer. 
This, of course, made necessary' 
advances in wages. Finally, these 
wage advances found their way 
into the products of labor and the 
farmer commenced to pay higher 
prices for the things that he 
bought. 

"In the deflation of commodities, 
the- course of affairs is reversed. 
The farmer's products must first ■ 
go down and when these decreas- 
ing costs, travelling through the 
proper channels, find their way 
to the consumer's pocket and are 
in turn reflected by a decrease in 
wages, then the products of labor 
will commence to decline. The 
reduction of wages, however, is a 
slow process, and for some time, 
at least, the farmer is going to 
find that his. products will decline 
in a larger percentage than does 
the price of the finished, labor- 
produced articles that he buys. 

"This economic fact, however, 
should not prevent the farmer 
from prospering, neither should it 
deter those who are interested in 
the implement business frora 
doine business in a normal and 

o 

logical Avay. 

"The cost of commodities that 
enter into implement construction 
AVas never as great' as at the 
present time. The advances that 
have occurred since a year ago 
run from five to sixty-nine per 
cent. Pig iron, the basic material 
used in implement construction, 
has gone up in the last year as 



much is it did during the entire 
war period. In addition to this, 
labor has advanced 11 per cent, 
and all together the implement 
cost situation is such that were it 
not for the weakness of farm 
products very substantial ad- 
vance would have had to be made 
in the selling price of our tools. 

"The price of the farmer's 
products definitely fixes the cost 
of living; the cost of living in- 
evitably determines the wage 
scale, and the price charged for 
the products of labor is regulated 
by these factors. It takes some 
little time for the change in the 
price of farm products to be re- 
flected in wages themselves; this 
is true whether the change in 
price is up or down. 

"Applying this to the implement 
business, you find that in July, 
1914, when 'the war broke out, the 
price of wheat was 80 cents a 
bushel. It was almost two years 
after that date, during which 
period -the price of wheat had 
gone to $2.00 a bushel, before the 
price of implements was advanced 
to the farpier, and now that the 
price of wheat and other farm 
products is declining, the farmer 
must expect tha't there is going to 
be some little lapse of time — 
perhaps not as much as during 
the period of advances — before 
this decreased price is going to 
find its way into the cost of imple- 
ments and other commodities that 
he purchases. He had altogether 
the best of it when the market 
went up — he is going to have to 
be a little patient in the readjust- 
ment down. 

"We must also have in mind, 
in this industry of ours, that our 
prices never went upward in pro- 
portion to the price of wheat or 
other farm products, and that 
during the entire period of the 
war, until a very recent date, the 
purchasing power of 'the farmer's 
crops, in terms of implements. 



has been much greater than dur- 
ing normal times. 

"Implement costs were never so 
high as at present, as will be 
evidenced by 'the following table 
which shows the contract prices 
that we pay at our factories for 
materials delivered at Moline, 111., 
and the cost of labor employed 
during the years 1915, 1919 and 
1920, together with the per- 
centage of increase in the cost of 
these commodities in 1919 and 
1920, respectively, over 1915, and 
in 1920 over 1919 : 

"From the above it will be seen 
that the percentage increase in 
cost of the principal materials and 
of the labor entering into imple- 
ment construction, is very much 
larger than the percentage in- 
crease in the price of implements. 

"In passing, let me call atten- 
tion, especially, to the large in- 
creases that the implement in- 
dustry is paying in .1920 over 1919, 
principal among which is the in- 
creased cost of pig iron, which is 
the basic commodity that deter- 
mines the cost of implements. 
The delivered cost of pig iron in 

1919 was $29.40, and in 1920 it 
was ,$44.95. During the entire 
course of the war pig iron only 
went up 109 per cent. The ad- 
vance in the price of pig iron in 

1920 over 1919 is another 109 per 
cent, or an amount equal to the 
total increase in cost during the 
war making present day advances 
218 per cent over pre-war prices 
and 53 per cent over 'the price of 
last year. 

"The implement industry should 
have had, to meet these increased 
costs, further increases in price of 
from ten to fifteen per cent. That 
these increases were not put on 
this fall is due to the, fact that 
farmers' products were so declin- 
ing that we have seen fit to 
operate with little if any profit, 
so as to help the country get back 
more nearly to a normal basis. 



COST OF MATERIALS UNDER PURCHASE CONTRACTS IN MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 
1915, 1919 AND 1920, WITH PERCENTAGE INCREASES 



Material 



Bessemer Steel Bars 

Common Iron Bars 

Old Rail Steel.. 

Cold Rolled Steel 

Sheet Steel No. 9 and No. 

10 Ga 

Soft Center Plow Steel (Reg, 

Mold. Shares) 

Disc Harrows — Base 

Coulter Blades, 15x.5-32 

Pig Iron 

Malleable , 



Yellow Pine Pole Stock . . . . 
Cotton Duck 47 inch No. 7 . 
Cotton Duck 47 inch No. 8 . 



1915 




1919 


1920 


Cost Del. 


Cost, 


Del. 


Cost Del. 


1 .38cwt. 


2 


70 


cwt. 


2. 84 cwt. 


1.35cwt. 


2 


70 


cwt. 


3 . 89 cwt. 


1.15cwt. 


2 


55 


cwt. 


3 . 65 cwt. 


1 .65 cwt. 


3 


75 


cwt. 


4 . 74 cwt. 


1.67cwt. 


3.9t) 


cwt. 


4.04 cwt. 


4.65 cwt. 


9 


85 cwt. 


11.49 cwt. 


2.90 cwt. 


7 


35 


cwt. 


8.99 cwt. 


40.00 c.p. 


85 


00 


c.p. 


103.00 c.p. 


14.10g. t. 


29 


40 


g. t. 


44.95 g. t. 


3. 30 cwt. 


8 


.25 


cwt. 


12.00 cwt. 










to 










14.00 cwt. 


40.00 m.f. 


75 


00 m.f. 


110.00 m.f. 


32.00 c. y. 










84 


.66 


c. y. 


114.75'c.y. 



% of 
Increase 
1919 
over 
1915 



% of 
Increase 
1920 
over 
1915 



% of 
Increase 
1920 
over 
1919 



95.7% 
100. % 
121.7% 
127.2% 

133 . 5% 

111.8% 
153.4% 
112., 5% 
109.5% 
150. % 



87.5% 
162 '..5% 



405.8%, 
188.1% 
217.3%, 
187.2% 

144. % 

147. % 
210. % 
157.5% 
218.7% 
263.6% 

324.2% 
175. % 

258 '.5% 



5.1% 
44. % 
43.1% 
26.4% 

3.5% 

16.6% 
22.3% 
21.1% 
52.8% 
45.4% 

69.6% 
46.6% 

.36 '.6% 



AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE PAID FOR NOVEMBER IN 1915, 1919,1920, WITH 
PERCENTAGE INCREASE 











% of 


% of 


% of 




1915 


1919 


1920 


Inc. '19 


Inc. '20 


Inc. '20 










over '15 


over '15 


over '19 




. 2983 hr. 


.6266 hr. 


.696 hr. 


110.08% 


133.32% 


11.07% 



"With the full knowledge of 
these facts in the hands of the 
dealer I see no reason why he 
should not be able to convince 
his farmer customer that even 
now implements are cheap. 

"I believe that during the next 
year there will be a substantial 
readjustment downward in the 
price of pig iron and those highly 
finished steel products, such as 
soft centre steel, disc harrow and 
coulter blades, and all other com- 
modities in which the advances 
have been inordinately high, as 
indicated by the table shown. 1 
do not expect, during this period, 
that any considerable reduction 
will be made in the price of com- 
mon steel bars. The U.S. Steel 
Corp. has already taken the in- 
flation out of this commodity and 
reduced it to the present labor 
basis. 

"I believe that as a result of 
these conditions the commodities 
which we buy will be reduced to 
a level of the prices maintaining 
in the fall of 1919 or the early 
spring of 1920. In connection 
with this, there will probably 
commence to be readjustments in 
the price of labor. These reduc- 
tions which I forsee should enable 
the implement industry to modify 
its prices for 'the spring trade of 
1922 to about the level of those 
maintaining when original con- 
tracts for the spring trade of 1920 
were made. 

"After the taking of this first 
slack out of prices, the readjust- 
ment to the new normal level will 
be a gradual one, requiring, in my 
judgment, at least, ten years of 
time. You cannot quickly reduce 
wages and it is not well for the 
country that 'this should be done. 
As the cost of products is largely 
made up of labor, the process of 
reducing these costs is a slow one. 

"In 1867, common iron bars 
were $4.50 f.o.b. Pittsburg, which 
was' substantially twice the price 
maintaining at the time 'the war 
opened. Common steel bars to- 
day are 105 per cent higher than 
when the war opened, so that 
price history has repeated itself 
on this very important com- 
modity. 

"Aside from the somewhat radi- 
cal decline that occurred in the 
prices of iron and steel in 1867 to 
1868, that is, during the third 
crop year after the Civil War, the 
readjustment in prices was a 
a gradual one, extending over a 
long period of years, it being sub- 
stantially 'ten years' time before 
a level of prices was reached 
which was comparable with the 
one preceding the opening of the 
war." 



Lawyers insist that home-made 
wills won't hold water. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 




"Old Number One," the first OilPull, built 
in 1909, has worked ever since and isn't 
half through. Repairs cost less than 5c 
a day. Owned by Frank Schultz, Agar, 
S Dak. 




OilPuIl Number 174, built in 1909, 12 years 
ago. The owner, C. J. Chandler, Lincoln, 
Kan., says it will last another decade. 
The only renewed parts of motor are four 
piston rings. 




OilPuIl Number 314, owned by F. Gas- 
perich, Onida, S. Dak. Built in 1909, it has 
cropped from 600 to 900 acres a year. Pulls 
eight bottoms in soil so tough that' eight 
horses can't pull a single bottom. 




"The Swamp Angel," so named by proud 
admirers in Northern Indiana for its ten 
years' work in the muck of the famed 
Kankakee. Has a record of marvelous 
performance and economy. 




OilPull Number 437, bought in 1910, 
owned by James Moss, Blue Island, 111, 
Is still 'young" after 11 years of hard, 
faithful work on the farm, and moving 
buildings at odd times. 




Sell a Tractor on 
Performance 

-not Promise 

THAT'S the one right way to sell a tractor — not on promises of 
what it may do, but on the record of what it actually has done 
over a long period of years in the hands of thousands of owners. 

Rumely dealers make effective selling capital of the remarkable 
twelve year performance record of the OilPull Tractor, 

The first OilPull tractor, built over twelve years ago, is still on 
the job. And hundreds of other old OilPulls — still going strong — 
prove that unusually long life is the rule with the OilPull, not 
the exception. 

And the OilPull you sell today has the same basic features of 
design, greatly improved and refined through twelve years of 
field use and constant factory tests. That is why the OilPull is, 
as it always has been, cheapest in cost per year of service. 

The OilPull tractor has for years held all the world's official 
tractor fuel economy records. It is the only tractor with which 
is given a written guarantee to successfully burn kerosene at all 
loads and under all conditions. 

Economy ^of upkeep is as marked. Less than $200 has been expended on "Old 
Number One" for repairs during its twelve years of continuous work. 

It is but natural that your customers should prefer a tractor with a record of 
performance such as this and in addition you have the assurance of such 
splendid features as 25% overload capacity, cooled with oil, double system of 
lubrication, Hyatt Bearings, and Rumely service including a factory trained 
expert for every ten tractors in use, scattered throughout the length and 
breadth of the land. 

Rumely dealers have four sizes to offer the tractor buyer — 12-20, 16-30, 20-40 
and 30-60 H. P. If you are interested in representing the Advance-Rumely line 
in your locality, get in touch with us immediately or with our nearest branch office, 

ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER COMPANY 



Calgary, Alta. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Regina, SasK. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Edmonton, Alta. 



ADVANCE-RUMELY 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Implement Manufacture in the 
U.S. 



In the impilement industry in 
the United States, the manufac- 
turer is confronted by the general 
beHef of the public tha't, because 
certain commodities have receded 
somewhat in price, all commodi- 
ties should at once igo back to 
pre-war levels. This is the view- 
point he confronts on the market- 
ing side. 

On the manufacturing side he 
faces the highest costs for his 
raw materials, fuel, labor and 
transportation that the industry 
has ever known ; he also faces the 
certainty that labor and transpor- 
tation costs will not soon be re- 
duced and he sees no sign that 
raw material and fuel costs will 
be any lower in the near future. 

In this industry it is not a case 
of maintaining prices in order to 
get rid of goods manufactured at 
abnormal costs. When the sup- 
plies of raw material now on hand 
are exhausted, the implement 
maker must go into 'the open 
mariket and continue to pay cur- 
rent high prices. 



Based on the lowest obtainable 
market prices, the following 
figures strikingly show the con- 
ditions vmder which the farm 
implement maker must make his 
plans and contract for materials 
to manufacture machines which 
the farmers of the country will 
need to till their soil and harvest 
their crops this year : 

Percentages of increase in cost 
of commodities. 

Transportation and labor be- 
tween October 1, 1914, and 
October 1, 1920. 

Coke increase, 263 per cent. 

Coal increase, 266 per cent. 

Iron increase, 257 per cent. 

Steel increase, 104 per cent. 

Freight rates, 101 per cent. 

Wages increase, 152 per cent. 

The items listed are the princi- 
pal elements of the cost of farm 
machinery-. The costs of coke, 
coal, pig iron and steel are chiefly 
de'termined by the wages of the 
labor required to produce them, 
and by the expense of transpor- 
tation. The recent heavy advance 
in freight rates was made by a 
government board working under 



Guarantee Your Customers Clean Seed 
by Selling Them 

"EASTLAKE" 
Grain Picklers 



Made of Heavy 
Galvanized Iron. 
Strongly reinforced. 
A strong, well-made 
Smut Destroyer, at 
a price that meets 
any competition. 



Crated for shipment with legs 
detached. Light in weight. Can 
be shipped by Express at small 
cost. 




Note the position of 
strong, galvanized 
mesh. Grain cau be 
dumped rapidly 
without wasting any 
solution. Saves its 
cost in a single sea- 
son. 



Smut causes a loss of 
thousands of dollars 
annually. "E a s t la k e" 
treated seed means 
better yields and bigger 
profits. 



Order a Stock— ;VOW 

Immerses and Treats EVERY KERNEL 

The Pickler season is here. Your business depends upon the success of your cus- 
tomers. The use of thoroughly clean, treated seed grain is essential. With the 
"Eastlake" Grain Pickler, the farmer can immerse his seed for a few seconds or 
several minutes as desired. Using the "Eastlake" he assures the complete eradica- 
tion of smut balls, and prevents possible loss. A low-set, strong and efficient pickler 
with ample capacity for any farm. Display one on your floor right away. Profitable 
business will follow. 

Concentrate on "Eastlake" Products this year. A complete line of Galvanized 
Shingles, Siding, Eave-Trough, Well Curbing, Culverts, Tanks, Garages, Portable 
Granaries, etc. Ask for illustrated literature and agency proposition. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

Manufacturers 

797 Notre Dame Ave. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



a federal law. Its purpose was to 
enable the railroads to meet an 
advance in wages fixed and pre- 
scribed by a government board, 
and to provide for improvement 
of transpor'tation facilities. 

Take, as an example, figures 
from a Minnesota manufacturer 
of trucks, sleighs and harrows, as 
given in Implement Age. They 
deal with the increase in materials 
and labor in producing the line 
stated. The percentages of in- 
crease are as follows : 

Truck . 128^ increase 

Complete wagon . . 104% increase 
150-tooth harrow. .270 fo increase 

Oak lumber 334% increase 

Maple lumber . . . .463% increase 

Fir lumber 264% increase 

Gum (for box) . . .426% increase 

Iron 241% increase 

Castings 540% increase 

Malleable iron .... 100% increase 

Paint 130% increase 

Common labor .... 150% increase 

Machine men 173% increase 

Helpers 150% increase 

Figures of similar purport 
might be quoted almost indefin- 
itely, and they all would serve to 
prove the contention of the farm 
equipment manufacturer, first, 
that his increases have not kept 
j)ace with 'the rising cost of ravv? 
materials and labor and, second, 
that the increases in the last year 
have been as great, in many in- 
stances, as in a period of several 
years just previously. 



Canada's Implement Industry 



Figures from Ottawa show that 
during 1919 agricultural imple- 
ments to the value of $36,703,943 
were manufactured in Canadian 
plants. The total capital invested 
in the industry was $83,276,450, 
of which $77,693,500 was in 
Ontario. The figures given show 
that 86 implement and farm 
equipment plants are in existence 
in Canada, the number by prov- 
inces being as follows : Ontario, 
51; Quebec, 20; Manitoba, 7; 



PUMPS 

AND 

Clothes Reels 

Made in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle pumps f pr 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys- 
tems. 



SUCCESSOBS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(Eatabllshed 1882) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS' PRICES 




North-West Pump Co. 

T. ft. WILUAMSON W. J. MEBRELL 
Phone 607 

19-6th Street Brandon, Man. 



Saskatchewan, 3 ; Alberta, 3, and 
Prince Edward Island, 2. 

Under the item of capital in- 
vested, the report states that 
$13,377,642 was inves'ted in land, 
buildings and fixtures, $7,156,394 
in machinery and tools, $34,521,- 
554 in materials on hand, stocks 
in process and finished products 
on hand ; $34,000 in fuel and mis- 
cellaneous supplies and $28,220,- 
860 in trading and operating 
accounts. 

Over 10,800 employees were re- 
ported, with a total in salaries 
and wages amounting to $11,858,- 
013. The average wage of oper- 
atives was from $20 to $24 per 
week. Raw materials to the value 
of $16,520,146 were used, steel to 
the amount of 65,843 tons, iron 
and steel castings, 40,055 tons and 
20,769 tons of malleables. Over 
42,986 M feet of lumber was used, 
with a value of $2,051,030. The 
total output of all products aggre- 
gated $36,703,943, the leading 
lines and values being; 27,912 
drills, $3,560,631; 70,372 plows, 
$3,355,773 ; 29,949 harvesters, $5,- 
169,075; 5,691 threshers, $3,071,- 
078, and 1,827 tractors with a 
factory value of $865,063. 

Canada's implement exports to 
the U.S. have risen greatly in 
recent years. In 1919 we only 
sold implements to the value of 
$250,000 to the U.S. ; in 1920 this 
had increased to, roughly, $3,250,- 
000. In contrast to 'this the sales 
of U.S. implements in Canada 
have dropped from over ten mil- 
lion in 1918 and nine million 
dollars in 1919 to, approximately, 
$7,000,000 last year. 



DeLaval Issue Chart 



The Dairy Development De- 
partment, of the DeLaval Separ- 
ator Company has just prepared 
an Educational Dairy Chart, 
which is very attractive and con- 
tains educational material of real 
value. The chart is being dis- 
tributed to rural and o'ther schools 
where agriculture is being 
taught, county agricultural agents 
and others interested in encour- 
aging better dairying methods. 

The DeLaval Separator Com- 
pany has always co-operated with 
movements for 'the benefit of the 
dairy industry. Some of its most 
valuable work has been done 
through the distribution of educa- 
tional booklets. 



I. H. C. Announce Dividend 



The first week in December the 
International Harvester Co., 
Chicago, declared a stock divi- 
dend of 2 per cent, and its regular 
quarterly dividend of 1% per 
cent on common stock. On Sept. 
15, says a report, the company 
declared a 12J^ per cent dividend. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



9 




Prosperous farmers are 
your best customers. 
De Laval Separators 
and De Laval Milkers 
bring prosperity to the 
farmers who use them. 

Now is the time to see about the De Laval 
Contract. Perhaps we need a separator or 
milker agency in your town. If you think we 
do send your application to nearest office. 

THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, Ltd. 

MONTREAL PETERBORO WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 
50,000 Branches and Local Agencies the World Over 

Sooner or later you will sell the 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



10 Canadian Farm Implements January, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



The Ronald-Smith Cultivator 
Co. Ltd. has been incorporated a't 
Regina. Capital is given as 
$25,000. 

The J. I. Case Threshing Ma- 
chine Co. has purchased a four- 
story building at Atlanta, Ga., to 
be used by its branch house there. 

The Baymac Tire & Rubber 
Co. has been incorporated at 
Grimsby, with a capital of 
$150,000. 

The J. I. Case T. M. Co. is 
erecting an addition to its branch 
at Syracuse, N.Y., to cost $90,000. 
The addition will be two stories, 
100x150. 

The B. & V. Motor Co. has 
been incorporated at East Moline, 
111., with a capital of $6,500,000 
'to manufacture motors, appli- 
ances, etc. 

The capital of the Metal 
Specialty Co., Regina, has been 
increased from $10,000 to $25,000 
by the issue of two hundred and 
fifty new shares. 

The Brantford Computing Scale 
Co. will shortly commence the 
manufacture of motors and cream 
separators in a separate plant 
west of the city. 

The International Harvester 
Co., in January, will begin the 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTE DO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for: 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Ltd.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
Co.; J. I, Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadiaa Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; Emerson-Branting- 
ham Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Statiley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.; 
Minneapolis Threshing Machine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



manufacture of a new type of 
light speed motor truck at its 
plant in Springfield, O. 

According to a report from 
Akron, O., the International Har- 
vester Co.'s motor truck plant in 
that cit}^ has announced a 20 per 
cent increase in production. 

Albertson & Co., Sioux City, 
Iowa, makers of motor repairing 
tools, have recently completed a 
modern daylight factory building, 
which stands on a five-acre tract. 

Oliver Chilled. Plow Works, 
South Bend, Ind., is drawing 
plans for five new structures 
which will increase its facilities 
for the production of tractor 
plows. 

HoUey Carburetor Co., Detroit, 
Mich., has added a new building 
which doubles its capacity. The 
new building will be used in the 
manufacture of the N-H car- 
buretor. 

J. E. Burnett has been ap- 
pointed general sales manager for 
the Parrett Tractor Co., Chicago 
Heights, 111. Mr. Burnett was 
formerly with the Dayton-Dawd 
Co., Quincy, 111. 

The Madison-Kipp Corp. of 
Madison, manufacturer of lubri- 
cating systems for tractors, ma- 
chinery, etc., is moving its new 
three-storey manufacturing plant 
and started operations January 3. 

The department of street clean- 
ing of New York City has 
awarded a contract to the Holt 
Mfg. Co., Peoria, 111., for fifty 
caterpillar tractors to be used in 
clearing the streets of snow in 
lower Manhattan. 
, The Antigo Tractor Co., 
Antigo, Wis., has purchased the 
plant of the Murray-Mylrea Co., 
in which its tractors have been 
produced. The company has in- 
creased its capital stock from 
$500,000 to $1,000,000. 

The Timken Roller Bearing 
Co., Canton, O., has published 
two booklets, the title of the first 
being "The Companies Timken 
Keeps," containing a list of all 



the automobile manufacturers us- 
ing Timken bearings. 

The International Harvester 
Co., Milwaukee, contemplates the 
erection of a new warehouse at 
its plant in Milwaukee. The plans 
call for a brick and steel structure, 
100x150, but the date of beginning 
construction is indefinite. 

A. Hemme Sons & Company, 
Limited, are a firm, incorporated* 
recently, who are manufacturing 
animal traps, root seeders and 
weed-destroying machines at El- 
mira, Ontario. Their factory is 
a brick building 28x133 feet. 

Modern Implements, Ltd., has 
been incorporated at Walkerville, 
Ont., with a capital of $100,000 to 
manufacture farm implements and 
tractors. The incorporators are 
C. D. Donaven, W. J. Davidson 
and Thos. Biggar. 

The Turner Mfg. Co., Port 
Washington, Wis., will erect a 
new foundry, 80x120, to cost 
$50,000. Work will be s'tarted 
about March 1. The company is 
planning a program of plant ex- 
pansion to start this year. 

The Gill Mfg. Co., Chicago, 
111., will erect a one-storey 
plant, 81 X 120, at a cost of 
$21,000. - For the present the 
building will be used for storage, 
but later will be equipped for the 
manufacture of piston rings. 

The International Harvester 
Co. has announced plans for a 
$3,000,000 investment in New 
Orleans, La., which will include 
a complete terminal plant for dis- 
tributing tools, machinery and 
twine, a thirty-acre site having 
been obtained. 

It is reported that the Ford 
Motor Co. has abolished territor- 
ial restrictions on the sale of Ford 
cars, trucks and tractors. Under 
the new plan if will be permis- 
sible for any dealer to solicit and 
sell in any territory without re- 
gard to other dealers. 

The Holt Farm Light Co. has 
been organized and incorporated 
at Toledo, O., with a capital 
stock of $1,000,000. It will take 
over the business of the Auto- 



matic^ Light Co. of Ludington, 
Mich., whach has been manufac- 
turing the Holt light plant. 

The Hercules Co., Evansville, 
Ind., is being organized by 
William H. McCurdy as a 
consolidation of the Hercules 
Buggy Co., Hercules Wheel Co., 
Hercules Body Mfg. Co., Indiana 
Color & Varnish Co., and 
Hercules Gas Engine Works. 

The Tiger Tire & Rubber 
Company, Limited, expect to 
commence the manufacture of 
auto tires and tubes at Belleville, 
Ontario, early this month. They 
have erected a factory there 
250x60 feet, and will employ 
about twenty-five hands at the 
start. 

Henry Ford and Edsel Ford 
are reported to have become 
associated with Ehrich & Graetz, 
a German firm making lighting 
fixtures and similar products, for 
the purpose of establishing a 
factory for the manufacture of 
Fordson tractors in Germany. 

Clifford F. Messinger has been 
appointed general sales manager 
of Chain Belt Co., Milwaukee, 
manufacturers of Rex chains, 
concrete mixers and elevating 
and. conveying machinery, 'to suc- 
ceed L. C. Wilson, who has re- 
signed to become secretary of the 
Federal Malleable Co. 

Articles of incorporation have 
been granted to the MoHne 
Engine Co., Moline, 111., a con- 
cern to manufacture and deal in 
engines, implements and other 
farm equipment. The capital 
stock is $2,930,000. R. S. Tuthill, 
Jr., C. B. O'Neil and Frank P. 
Page are the incorporators. 

The Piston Ring Co., Eau 
Claire, Wis., a new corporation 
with $25,000 capital has leased 
splice and is buying equipment 
for manufacturing piston rings for 
explosive engines, as well as other 
automotive parts and accessories. 
C. M. Pratt and E. L. Ross will 
be active manaigers of the busi- 
ness. 

The U.S. Tractor & Machinery 
Co.,- Menasha, Wis., announces 
the appointment of W. H. Wil- 
liams as general agent in north- 
western territory, with head- 
quarters at Minneapolis. Mr. 
Williams was formerly with the 
Hart-Parr Co., Charles City, la., 
and with the Eagle Mfg. Co., 
Appleton, Wis. 

Brockville's new i n d u s 't r i a 1 
plant of Machinery & Foundries, 
Ltd., is almost ready for opera- 
tion. General foundry and ma- 
chine shop products will be turned 
out, and there will be special 
attention paid to the manufacture 
of both power ' and hand pumps. 
The cost of constructing 'the plant 
will be about $75,000. 



KINGSTON 

IGNITION SERVICE 

SPARK PLUGS — COILS 
MAGNETOS— SWITCHES 

KOKOMO ELECTRIC CO. 

KOKOMO - - INDIANA - U. S. A. 



lanuaiv, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



III order lo meet the power 
problems in industries where the 
■'Cateri)illar" tractors are used, 
the Holt MfR. Co., Peoria, 111., 
has desig-ned and built winch 
attachments for its 5 and lO-'ton 
models. These attachments will 
be especially useful in the oil 
helds, logging camps and may be 
adapted to clearing land. 

The Frick-Geiser Co. has been 
•organized at Waynesboro, Pa., 
with a capital stock of $3,000,000. 
This organization takes over 'the 
tractor and thresher business of 
the P'rick Co. It has also pur- 
chased the old Geiser plant at 
Wavnesboro, which has been 
iwned and operated in recent 
vears b\- llic ]'".mersnn-P)ranting- 
ham Co. 

Among the representatives of 
the Imi)erial Oil Co. attending 
a conference at Sarnia lately Avere 



B. Kingsmill, of Vancouver; 
F, Key and L. Lockhurst, of 
Saskatoon; J. McCahey, of Mon- 
treal ; D. Harris, Halifax ; T. 
Miller, Calgary; E. Woolley, St. 
John, N.B. ; S. McCath, Winni- 
peg; D. Cummings, of Regina, 
and J- Webb, of Edmonton. 

Twenty-two . separate councils 
representing more than 45,000 
employees in all the various 
l^lants, factories and mines of the 
International Harvester Com- 
pany, have been formed within 
two years, according to Arthur 
H. Young, manager of industrial 
relations for the company. 
Througli the councils all ques- 
tions relating to things beneficial 
or detrimental to the company or 
the workers were settled. 

The American Bosch Magneto 
Corp., Springfield, Mass., has just 
developed a new impulse starter 



ANNOUNCEiyiENT 

The Sawyer-Massey Company Limited 
beg to advise the Trade that they will 
hereafter control the sale of 

WALLIS TRACTORS and 

J. I. Case Plow Works Co.'s 
Power Tillage Implements 

in Western Canada. 
These lines, together with 

SAWYER-MASSEY Tractors 
SAWYER-MASSEY Threshers 
SAWYER-MASSEY Road Machinery 

will afford the best and most aggressive 
Dealers throughout the West an op- 
portunity of securing a 
VALUABLE AGENCY-- A REAL MONEY-MAKER 

1921 Contract Forms are now ready, 
and those interested should write im- 
mediately regarding exclusive territory. 

Well assorted stocks of extras will be 
carried at the Company's Western 
Branches. Address 



SAWYER-MASSEY COMPANY 

LIMITED 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 



ASPIKWALL 




ASPI N WALL 
OTATO PLANTER 

DRAWN BYTRACTOP^ 




FIRST, SUCCESSFUL, AUTOMATIC POTATO PLANTER 
placed on the market was an 

ASPTNWALL 

Aspinwall machines are built of the same 
HIGH-GRADE, FIRST-CLASS 
MATERIAL and WORKMANSHIP 

as in the past- --machines that worthily sustain 
OUR ESTABLISHED REPUTATION 

OUR 1921 CONTRACTS AND PRICES ARE NOW READY 

WRITK F O 1! CATALOG AND AGENCV PROPOSITION :: 



ASPINWALL 
Four-Row Sprayer 




AN ASPINWALL MACHINE for 
EVERY REQUIREMENT 
of the Potato Grower 



Cutters 
Planters 
Sprayers 
Diggers 



Sorters 



WORLDS OLDEST AND LARGEST MAKERS OF POTATO MACHINERY 

Aspinwall Canadian Company Limited 

GUELPH, ONTARIO, CANADA 



■ ■■■i 



ASPINWALL niiSftiT 
with Extension 
E!evatf»r 




12 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 192] 



coupling fori starting heavy duty 
engines. It is a spring release 
device, which, when attached to 
the magneto on a tractor or 
motor truck, gives the armature 
a quick spin as the engine is be- 
ing cranked. When the engine 
attains a speed of 100 to 120 
r.p.m. after starting, the coupling 
automatically disconnects itself. 

British Factories in Canada 



There are now oyer 500 branch 
factories of American firms in 
Canada, while evidence from all 
parts of the Dominion shows that 
this industrial immigration from 
the States is destined to increase 
rapidly. On the other hand, only 
eight British manufacturers so far 
have set tip factories. 



Bradshaw, General Manager of 
Massey-Harris Co. 

Thomas Findley, until recently 
president and general manager of 
the Massey-Harris Co., has re- 
signed from the latter position on 
account of ill-health, but will con- 
tinue as chief executive of the 
company. 

Thomas Bradshaw, who last 
spring went to the Massey-Harris 
Co. as treasurer, has been ap- 
pointed general manager. Mr. 
Bradshaw was at one time a 
partner in the firm of A. E. Ames 
& Co., and was considered one of 
Canada's leading experts in muni- 
cipal finance. During the war he 
was appointed Finance Commis- 
sioner for the City of Toronto 
and succeeded in putting the 



financial af¥airs of the city on a 
sound basis. In his new position, 
Mr. Bradshaw will be assisted by 
C. L. Wisner as assistant general 
manager in charge of sales, and 
George Valentine as assistant 
general manager in charge of 
manufacturing. Mr. Findley 
worked himself to the top of the 
vast Massey-Harris organization 
inside of twenty years. Starting 
in as a telephone operator he 
successively filled almost every 
post in the organization — clerk, 
foreman, superintendent, assistant 
general manager, general man- 
ager, director, president. 



Lots of storekeepers can get 
new customers. It takes a mer- 
chant to keep old ones. 

1 



Appointed Local Agents 

McDonald & McKinnon, 156 
Princess St., Winnipeg, have been 
appointed, local agents for the 
Sawyer-Massey line. They will 
work in conjunction with the 
Sawyer-Massey Co. in selling this 
Canadian-made line of tractors, 
threshers and road machinery, 
also the Wallis tractor and line of 
power farming machinery made 
by the J. I. Case Plow Works, 
Racine, Wis., which are now being 
distributed by the .Sawyer- 
Massey Co. 

F. N. McDonald, manager of 
the company, looks forward to a 
busy season with the new lines he 
has taken on, and is now making 
arrangements to push same in the 
territory. 



Tractor Inventor Dead 

Benjamin Holt, inventor of the 
Caterpillar tractor and president 
of the Holt Mfg. Co., Peoria, 111., 
and Stockton, Cal., died at his 
home in Stockton, Cal., recently. 
Mr. Holt was born in New Flamp- 
shire in 1849 and since 1883 has 
been actively engaged in the 
development of farm and road 
machinery. In 1883 he organized 
the Holt Mfg. Co., and has been 
identified with it ever since. He 
leaves a wife and four sons. 



Tractor Co. Moves to 
Montreal 

The Cleveland Tractor Co. of 
Canada have moved their head 
office in Canada from Windsor, 
Ont., to 21 Ottawa St., Montreal. 
The company decided that 
Montreal isj a better distributing 
centre for Eastern Canada than 
Windsor. The object of the com- 
pany is to endeavor to give its 
owners a 24-hour service. The 
establishment of their Western 
branch at Winnipeg enables them 
to give this service in Western 
Canada. 



J.I. Case Plow Works 
Company Open 
New Branch 



The Indianapolis branch of the 
J. I. Case Plow Works Companj- 
is now occupying its new 
quarters, and prepares for a pro- 
gram of business expansion made 
possible by the added facilities of 
office, shipping, sample, and 
storage room afforded in the 
building just completed. 

This splendid structure is built 
of reinforced concrete, six stories 
and basement. There are three 
elevators, front and rear stair- 
ways, modern lighting and 
heating facilities, and all the 
advantages of well ventilated, 
fire-proof, convenient construc- 
tion 



A FAST SELLING LINE FOR YOUR STORE THIS SPRING! 

GREGG 4 or 5-HORSE PLOW EVENERS 



The Best 
Plow Hitch 
Made. 




Order 
Your Stock 
Now. 



Our No. 410 Four-Horse Gang, Sulky and Disc Plow Evener works four horses abreast, one horse in the 
furrow. Perfect distribution of draft; every horse pulls its share. Extra heavy eveners and single-trees. 
Strong malleable castings; straps of high-grade steel. Can be used on any plow with a cross clevis hitch, or any 
flat draft bar for disc plows. With special clevis attachment it is adaptable to any frame or vertical clevis hitch. 
The No. 420 works five horses abreast, one horse in furrow. Ample working room. Heavy construction; 

strongly made of specially selected hardwood. Adaptable to any gang with a cross 
clevis hitch. M ith clevis attachment, fits any gang frame hitch or frame beam gang 
design. We'll be glad to supply full details of those profitable spring lines. 

GREGG Wagon Hardware—A Paying Specialty 

We manufacture a full line, comprising Neckyoke Centre Irons, Singletree and 
WhifPetree Ferrules and Hooks, Neckyoke End-Irons, Wagon Box Straps and Braces, 
Box Rods, Wagon Wrenches, Screw Pin Clevises, etc. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR GREGG Our lines led in quality, popularity and demind last year. 
GOODS — ACCEPT NO OTHERS. Add to your profits in 1921 by selling Gregg Goods. 

Gregg Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 




The Famous "GARDEN CITY FEEDER" 



The World's Best 
Band 'Cutter and 
Self-Feeder. 



Every Owner of a Threshing 
Machine NEEDS it. 

Why don't YOU sell it to him? 

GENEROUS commissions paid 
to LIVE agents. 




No DEAD ones wanted. 



ASK ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FIRMS FOE CONTRACT 



The GARDEN CITY FEEDER CO., Ltd., Regina, Sask. 



BRUCE DAVISON CO., Brandon, Man. 
A. E. GARDINER, Saskatoon, Sask. 

P S. - WE PhSO SELL THE CASWELL ADJUSTABLE BELT GUIDE 



W. S. MUNROE CO., Calgary, Alta. 
MART McMAHON, Lethbridge, Alta. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



13 



The Cancellation of Orders 



The Chamber of Commerce iti 
the United States recently issued 
results of an exhaustive investiga- 
tion regarding the practice of can- 
celling orders and repudiating 
contracts. The report groups 
opinions as to possible causes 
under three heads : 

"First: That the practice is 
the result of war-time irregulari- 
ties and will pass as we return to 
;i normal basis. 

"Second : That we are now 
reaping the results of the loose 
business practices inaugurated 
before the war, when many lines 
were in a state of overproduction 
and the measures taken to unload 
this surplus were demoralizing. 
Those entertaining this belief feel 
that the remedy is in a general 
reformation of our system of 
order 'taking, making each order 
a contract enforceable by law. 

"Third; That we have been 
drifting away from the funda- 
mentals of sound business and the 
'Golden Rule', and that we must 
return to a stronger belief in the 
rights of others and a higher re- 



gard for our own integrity if the 
change is to be permanent." 

Terming the cancellation prac- 
tice a "serious matter", the bulle- 
tin goes on to say that "earlier 
in the year when cancellations 
began to trickle in they were 
almost welcomed by those having 
more' orders than production, but 
as prices began to crumble and 
the tide of refusals to perform 
set in, the seriousness of the 
situation was manifest, for it 
brought with it a curtailment of 
production in lines which had aot 
reached the volume of normal 
requirements. 

"The retailer cancelled to the 
jobber and wholesaler and they in 
turn to the maufacturer, and he 
to those supplying his raw mater- 
ials — a literal 'passing the buck' 
and shirking of responsibility 
regardless of consequences. Sel- 
lers had encouraged buyers by 
misleading paternalism in assum- 
ing many of the natural responsi- 
bilities inherent of their custom- 
ers' functions as merchants. 'We 
will take care of you', or 'You 
may return the goods', are ex- 
amples of some of the under- 



mining factors when the pinch 
came. Everybody seemed to be 
doing it and it was by no means 
confined to the weak, but houses 
of more than ordinary standing 
permitted their buyers to get rid 
of their responsibility." 

The U.S. National Association 
of Credit Men suggests that there 
seems to have been a dulling of 
public conscience. 

"Should one who habitually 
repudiates his contracts and 
orders be given a higher credit 
rating than he who lets his notes 
and drafts go to protest?" They 
also feel that one remedy, and as 
a safeguard against the unscrupu- 
lous, would be 'that each line of 
trade should at once examine its 
contract making and order taking 
methods to bring them strictly 
within legal lines. This is prac- 
tical and can be immediately 
applied." 



Belgians Have Shows Again 



An Ode for Southern Alberta 



Little drops of water, 
Mingled with the sand, 

Make a mighty difference 
In the price of land. 



The International Harvester 
Company de Belgique, which was 
born on the anniversary of the 
signing of the armistice, Novem- 
ber Uth, 1919, has just finished 
its first agricultural exhibit at 
Brussels, Belgium. This is the 
first exhibition held in Belgium 
since the war and was very 
largely attended. 

The exhibit was visited by the 
Minister of Agriculture for Bel- 
gium and the French Minister of 
Agriculture, both of whom ex- 
pressed their enthusiasrn for the 
good work that the Titan 10-20 
and the International 8-16 have 
done towards putting large por- 
tions of the devastated areas of 
France and Belgium back on a 
farming basis. 

The regular harvesting line was 
well represented in Belgium be- 
fore the war, and now with the 
establishment of a branch in Bel- 
gium it is to be expected that the 
full line will do its part toward 
re-establishing Belgium's reputa- 
tion as one of the garden spots of 
Europe. 



"WATERLOO" 
"ROCK ISLAND" 

DEALERS: Sell the Lines That the Farmers KNOW! 

Your success this year will largely be based on the quality of the 
lines you handle. Growing confidence in tractor and thresher reliabil- 
ity is paralleled by growing sales. Make your sales easier and more 
profitable by selling '*WATERLOO"-"R0CK ISLAND" goods. 

LICinUD TD A r'TADC 12-20 and 9-16 h.p. mean success for 
nCilUCiIV ItvAvlUIViJ the dealer. No gears to strip. The 
— — patented, friction-type drive elimin- 
ates bevel gears, transmission gears and clutch, giving seven 
speeds, forward or reverse, for either traction or belt work. 
You sell the farmer power for every job — a standard, proven, 
four-wheel, four-cyl. tractor, burning gasoline i or kerosene 
without carburetor changes. HEIDER TRACTORS have led in 
reliability, performance.and_sales for over 13 years. 



Thirteen Years* 
Actual 
Field Work 



We Manufacture 
and Distribute 



Kerosene Tractors, 
Tractor Plows, Port- 
able and Traction 
Steam Engines, Separators, Wind 
Stackers, Baggers, Threshers' Sup- 
plies, Etc. 





"WATERLOO" 

Champion Separators for 1921 

Sizes: 20x36, 24x36, 24x42, 28x42, 32x52, 36x56 and 40x62 
Canada's best threshers. Guaranteed grain savers. 
They assure the farmer maximum crop value, and the 
dealer the thresher trade in his territory. Built for 
hand-feed or self -feed without change. The standard of 
perfection for over 60 years. 

"WATERLOO" Steam Engines 

Made in 16, 18, 22 and 25 h.p. Perfect in design; easy 
to operate. Very economical. Unequalled for plowing 
and threshing. High pressure boilers; ample steam 
The most smooth-running, powerful steamers on the market. 

Handle "ROCK ISLAND" Tractor Tools 

Nos. 9 and 12 TRACTOR PLOWS work perfectly with any tractor. 
Equipped with the famous moisture-saving CTX mold board. 2, 3 or 4 
bottoms. Furrow wheel lift. 

No. 38 TRACTOR DISC— a one-man harrow in every detail. Gangs 
work independently up and down or sideways. All levers operated 
from tractor. 8 and 10 ft. sizes. 

A Line Will Bring You Our 1921 Dealer Proposition 

The WATERLOO MANUFACTURING CO. Ltd. 

REGINA PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE SASKATOON 

Alberta Distributors: UNITED ENGINES & THRESHERS LTD., Calgary and Edmonton 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921. 



A "Case" of Saving a Wheat 
Crop 



The following account of how 
tractors saved a wheat crop b}' 
liaiiling it to shelter over almost 
impassable roads, comes to the 
J. I. Case T. M. Co., Racine, Wis., 
in a letter from W. D. Ramsey, 
of Floydada, Texas. 

"A granar}' burst during a rain 
storm and the grain had to be 
moved regardless of road condi- 
tions. We loaded 200 bushels on 
each of the three tractors, and by 
cleaning the lugs several times, 
made the trip of 16 miles in about 
four and one-half hours. The 
entire amount of wheat on the 
14 wagons is 1,160 bushel, 600 
of which was on the three trac- 
tors, 20 horses pulling 560. The 
tractors out-travelled the teams. 

"If you will notice carefully, 




Showing how a Tractor Solved the Haulage Problem in Saving a Wheat Crop. 



you will see that the streets have 
much water standing in them as 
had also the roads in the country. 

"Of course, the 200 bushels is 
not a load for the tractors except 
on account of road conditions. As 




Agents will find this machine a 
great seller. Write for 
terms to agents. 



Concrete for Small Jobs 

such as foundations, culverts, bam walls and cellars 
can now be mixed at one-quarter the cost, and 20 
per cent of the cement can be saved. 

Thousands of farmers now own a CONCRETE 
MIXER, a real necessity on every farm where build- 
ings are to be erected or repaired. 

The London Gem Concrete Mixer 

is our latest Engineering Triumph. It solves the 
problem of Mixing Concrete on small jobs. It can 
be operated by one man. Can be run by hand or 
connected to a Gasoline Engine or any kind of power. 

It is well built, has practically no parts to wear out, 
and will save the price of itself in ten days' use. 



London Concrete Machinery Co. Limited, London, Canada 

Dept. K WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF CONCRETE MACHINERY 



SELL the BEST, as it sells the 
- easiest ! The farm-wife, who 
uses the cream separator most, 

wants 'that machine which gives her the 
least trouble. Women these days are too 
busy to have to wash twice a day, from 20 
to 30 separate discs, and then try to get 
them together again in their correct order. 
The "Viking" saves them all this bother, for, 
in addition to being the most perfect skim- 
mer known, all the dies are on a ring and 
never have to be taken off to be cleaned. There are 
more "sellinR points" on a Viking than on any 
other separator sold. Send for r. ;r dealer proposi- 
tion and latest Catalog No. 165 

SWEDISH SEPARATOR COMPANY 
714 Confederation Life Bid 
Winnipeg, Man 



Mill 



one of the tractors was mine, I 
know just the amount of load and 
fuer taken: Wheat, 12,000 lbs.; 
wagons, 4,000 lbs. ; fuel consump- 
tion, 17 miles, 9 gallons of gaso- 
line. 

"We consider this a very good 
record as the roads were con- 
sidered impassable with loads by 
most people. My tractor broke 
the road." 



Success in Engine Business 



C. J. Nelson, of the Nelson 
Bros Co., Saginaw, Mich., re- 
cently addressed a letter to the 
trade that is singularly approp- 
riate at the present time. Mr. 
Nelson says : 

"The gloom dispenser is not 
peculiar to the engine business 
alone. Even the ancient Greeks 
spoke of the man who couldn't 
see the forests because of the 
trees. 

"In farm power businesses, 
there are some who have won 
success easilv — ^ without effort. 



These firms to-day see only chaos 
and trouble in the trade markets 
ahead. And so with chart and 
slide rule they prove disaster to 
the confusion of themselves and 
the amusement of the well organ- 
ized. 

"For, after all, the elements of 
success in the engine business are 
simple and hard. 

"Make worthy goods, advertise 
and merchandise them intelli- 
gently, back your product sin- 
cerely and honestly. And keep 
everlastingly at it. For, after all, 
reaction means only a change, the 
path of depression means elimin- 
ation of the unnecessary, and the 
"price level" means only right 
prices. 

"Hard, earnest efifort has en- 
abled VIS to develop our engine 
to one of the easiest selling small 
])ower units on the market." 



Sales experts state that the 
farmer will always choose quality 
as against price in a deal. What 
farmer? *■ 



Ma| oil 




WAGON 
TANKS 

Will be a profit- 
making investment 
for the oil using 
farmers in your district 

AND 

a profitable line for you to handle and push 
the sale of. 

This is the time of the year in which to get 
your list of prospects prepared and to begin 
sending them the literature that will prepare 
them for the display of a sample later. 

WRITE TO-DAY AND LET US KNOW 
HOW MANY CIRCULARS YOU NEED 

Western Steel Products Limited 



WINNIPEG 

Man. 



RKGINA 

Sask. 



CALGARY 

Alta. 



EDMONTON 

Alta. 



•lanuaty, 192J 



Canadian Farm Implements 



I.') 




What Would You Think of a Shoe 
Dealer With But One Size Shoe? 

You wouldn't think very much of him, would you? 

Yet he is not much different than the tractor dealer with but one size 
tractor. As one Avery tractor dealer -himself said: "Trying to do a 
tractor business with one size tractor is about as ridiculous as trying to 
run a shoe store with one size of shoes." 

No one size tractor fits every farmer's needs. Most farmers have different 
size farms and different kinds of work to do and want the tractor best 
adapted for the job. 

With the Avery Line you can offer a size tractor to exactly fit any farmer's 
needs. There are two sizes of small tractors, the Avery Six-Cylinder and 
the Avery 5-10 H. P. Model "B." There are also four sizes of "medium 
sized" tractors, three sizes of "large tractors," and two sizes of motor 
cultivators, besides Avery Trucks and the complete line of Avery Tractor- 
operated tillage tools and belt machinery 
Why not be the tractor dealer with the complete line? 

Get the "whip-hand" on competition. Be in a position to satisfy the 
motor farming needs of any farmer in your territory. 

Every machine in the Avery Line offers money-making possibilities for the 
Avery dealer. NOW is the time when you want to remove every possible 
selling resistance, and having the right machine in the right size to meet 
your prospective customers' needs means a lot in helping to close the sale. 

The Avery contract offers advantages which you have always wanted. 
Write us and we will be glad to tell you about them. 



AVERY CO. Factory and Main Office, Peoria, III., U.S.A. 

Western Canadian Distributors: 

CANADIAN AVERY XO. LTD., WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Branches: Regina and Calgary. Sub-Branch: Edmonton 

VERY 





Tractors ♦Trucks.Motor Cultivators. 
Threshers, Plows, etc* 



16, 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 




THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPROVINCIAL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 



A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF DEALERS IN AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES, ENGINES AND MACHINERY 



Established in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLDG. WINNIPEG, CANADA 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

11.00 per year in Canada: Foreign $1.25 per year Single Copies, Ten Cents 



ADVERTISING 

RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this office not later than tlhe 25th of the 
month preceding issue in wbicih insertion is desired. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name. We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 



Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post Office as second class matter. 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, JANUAEY, 1921 



The Year Ahead 

We believe it will generally be 
conceded that 1921 will be a year 
when all of us will have to hustle 
for business. Possibly it is better 
so, for in the easy days of ex- 
cessive demand and reduced sup- 
ply, selling in most lines devel- 
oped into taking orders — not de- 
veloping business. 

But from now on, every factor 
in the trade, from the manufac- 
turer to the dealer, will have to 
use the old time effort and sales- 
manship. The ship of business is 
heading through somewhat 
troubled seas. Some of us arc 
sick, but there is ciuiet water 
ahead. 

From the dealer's standpoint 
this will be no year for staying 
around the store and bemoaning 
the lack of business. It should 
be a sound policy to develop every 
possible sale in sight b)' every 
possible means. Clean, attractive 
stocks, well displayed. Local ad- 
vertising and the constant use of 
vour prospect list. Demonstra- 
tions of machines for which a 
demand can be developed. Visits 
to the farmers in your 'territory, 
and a thorough search for every 
potential sale among your cus- 
tomers, these are but a few of 
the ways in which business may 
be stimulated. 

And we will have to operate 
our business as economically as 
possible. In the past few years 
our profit statements have bulked 
larger 'than -our cost sheets. Un- 
necessary expense, especially un- 
necessary service, should be elim- 
iiiated. 

A business solid built should 
easily stand steady and sure dur- 
ing a period of deflation. In times 
of prosperity — of inflation — the 
business man prepares for the 
period of reaction. Losses are 
bound to come, the law of aver- 
ages is bound to overtake us, and 
it is then that a solid business 
can weather the storm. 

The credit system, from which 
many of the losses in business 
come, always requires'close atten- 
tion, but in times like the present 
not only requires close atten- 
tion, but most serious considera- 
tion. Ever>' man who owes a 
dollar should endeavor to clean 
it up or reduce it during 1921 if 
it is humanly possible for him 
to do so, and new debts, as far 
as possible, should be for produc- 
tive purposes. There are few, if 
any, countries bet'ter of¥ finan- 
cially than Canada — the United 
States being practically the only 
one— and even there their present 
financial troubles are much more 
apparent and much more real than 
here in Canada. The Canadian 
manufacturer has and will have 



for some time to come the great- 
est opportunity of his life to man- 
ufacture and sell in the home 
market, which, after all, is the 
best market, in easy competition 
Avith the United States. He has 
the advantage of the duty plus 
exchange, which during the past 
year has averaged very high, and 
these two factors should be much 
to his advantage. 

In the implement trade, while 
Ave may look for no record sales 
there is no reason why a satis- 
factory and normal demand 
should not be found in connection 
with the majority of lines. Let 
us take an optimistic view. Slam 
pessimism; Do everj^thing you 
can to get the normal amount of 
l)usiness arfd profit during 1921. 



Be a Mixer 



Personal contact with the cus- 
tomer is one of the best assets a 
dealer can have in the implement 
business. It helps show the 
farmer that you are not a half- 
bad sort, that the opinion that an 
implement dealer is a second 
cousin to Shylock is erroneous. 
It is not wasted time, but a sound 
l)olicy to take lots of interest in 
your customers. Visit them. 
Make them your personal friends. 
Go out to the farm homes. Get 
an intimate knowledge of the con- 
ditions in your territory. Find the 
prospects while they are budding 
and blooming. When a new cus- 



tomer shows up, don't be long in 
yetting out to his place. Make 
his personal acquaintance. Make 
friends with the whole family. 



The Future in Tractor Business 



■ Tractors from now on will have 
lo be sold on the basis of utility. 
The farmer will have to be shown 
that the investment in a tractor 
A\ ill enable him to produce more 
economically and in larger quan- 
tity. The appeal to the farmer 
will noAv be on a dollars-and-cents 
basis. 

The new situation will call for 
more constructive, more intensive, 
salesmanship on the part of the 
dealer. The manufacturer's con- 
cern will be to get better dealers. 
Within the next year or two the 
industry will, doubtless, witness a 
heavy dealer turnover. Only real 
dealers can survive. The impor- 
tance of real tractor dealers will 
be appreciated by 'the industry as 
never before. 

Better merchandising will be 
necessary. The selling end of the 
industry must convince the farmer 
that while the prices of his prod- 
ucts are falling, the need for 
power farming is increasing. The 
dealer must be able to capitalize 
the fact that cheaper prices for 
farm products necessitate their 
being produced more cheaply, 
which can only be done through 
power farming machinery. 



Handling Accessory Lines 

In selecting an auto accessory 
stock, care should be taken to 
get as nearly standard articles as 
possible. This is a good line to 
handle for every season is getting 
longer as regards the use of the 
automobile. Cars are brought out 
earlier in spring and run later in 
the fall. They have come to stay, 
and many accessories will be 
I)ough't during the running season. 
The farm equipment dealer in 
many localities will find this line 
very profitable. Select stock care- 
fully, then talk about your acces- 
sories. Point out that your tools, 
tires, oil, etc., are the best on the 
market. Pretty soon you will find 
.trade come yotir way, because you 
have the stock, and because your 
stock is standard. 

Display oi goods is a most im- 
portant factor in building a de- 
mand for accessories. A display 
board, for example, showing the 
motorist the dififerent kind of 
wrenches that can be used on his 
car will give the 'dealer a good 
opportunity to sell him types and 
sizes he .does not possess. Com- 
plete tool kits shown on a display 
l)oard so that they are brought 
prominently to the attention of 
the customer will cause the au'to^ 
mobile owner to buy a complete 
set when otherwise he would have 
purchased only one or two tools 
at the most. 

A successful dealer in automo- 
l)ile equipment advises tha't dis- 
play boards and glass cases should 
line the walls of the accessory 
store. In place of the traditional 
small drawers for the small items 
he advises the use of pigeon holes 
or bins concealed by display 
l^oards which are hanged to the 
shelfing or which slide on rails 
in front of the shelves. These 
display boards will sell many 
things that otherwise would no't 
be brought to the attention of 
the customer and it should always 
l)e borne in mind that the cus- 
tomer is willing to buy if he can 
see what he wan'ts. 



freight Rates Reduced 



Effective January 1st, the in- 
crease in freight rates of 40 per 
cent east of Fort William and 
35 per cent west thereof, were 
reduced to 35 per cent east of 
Fort William and 30 per cent 
west of that point. 

This means that now the rates 
in Eastern Canada are 35 per cent 
higher then they were prior to 
September 13, 1920, and rates -in 
AVestern Canada are now 30 per 
cent higher than the rates in effect 
prior to September 13, 1920. 

For example, the second and 
sixth class rates, "all rail", which 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



became effective the first day of 
the year, from Toronto to Winni- 
peg, Calgary and Vancouver, or 
in the opposite directions are 

Toronto and Winnipeg : 
Second class, $2.3954 ; sixth class, 
$1.09>4 per 100 lbs. 

Toronto and Calgary : Second 
class, $4.1314 ; sixth class, $1.96 
per 100 lbs. 

Toronto and Vancouver : 
Second class, $5.03 ; sixth class, 
$2.44>4 per 100 lbs. 

The 'two classes quoted are 
those taken by the majority of 
lines in the farm implement and 
equipment industry. 



Selling Used Tractors 

Dealers handlingf second-hand, 
or used, tractors naturally can be 
expected to sell more tractors 
than those who do not. The used 
tractor will interest some farmer 
who is not a prospect for a new 
machine, while the farmer who 
lias traded in the old tractor is 
a prospect for a new one. To the 
dealer it means a profit on the 
new tractor, as well as creating a 
new prospect by the used tractor, 
who will much sooner become a 
prospect for a new machine. 

No one can doubt that the used 
car has done its share 'toward pop- 
ularizing automobiles. The used 
tractor doubtless will have the 
same effect upon the tractor in- 
dustry. A farmer may realise the 
need of a tractor but feel that he 
cannot afford more than an $800 
investment. If he buys from a 
dealer who is making a success 
of his used tractor department, 
he is assured of a machine that 
will give him good satisfaction 
until he feels financially able to 
buy a new machine. 



Hail Insurance in 
Saskatchewan 



Saskatchewan's losses from hail 
in 1920 was very much lower than 
in the previous year, according to 
a special report by A. E. Fisher, 
superintendent of insurance for 
Saskatchewan, with a statement 
of the premium income received 
and 'the claims paid by the various 
companies underwriting hail in- 
surance in Saskatchewan during 
1920. The figures are not com- 
plete as there are several com- 
panies which have not yet filed 
their returns, but they show a 
loss ratio for 1920 which is only 
a little more than half the loss 
ratio for 1919, when the premiums 
of the hail companies amounted 
to $2,314,987.43 with losses paid 
totalling $1,806,208.21, loss ratio 
of 78.02, while the loss ratio for 
1920 is estimated at approxi- 
mately 41 per cent. The state- 
ment does not deal with the 
Municipal Hail Association, 



Personal 



C. E. Norby has opened a har- 
ness business at Elnora. 

James Mace has opened a har- 
ness business at Rumsey. 

L. Rathgeber has sold out his 
implement business at Goodloe. 

J. W. Closs has sold out his har- 
ness business at Foam Lake. 

Peter R. Toews has commenced 
in the implement business at 
Giroux. 

The McKenzie Garage, at High 
River, is reported to have changed 
hands. 

J. Work has discontinued his 
automobile business at Strath- 
more. 

W. L. Folliott is stated to have 
closed his automobile concern at 
Plato. 

Sinclair & Bratseth have 
opened an automobile business at 
Milden. 

The Precision Machine Co. is 
a new concern doing business at 
Calgary. 

R. C. Conrad is reported to 



have sold out his garage interests 
at Milden. 

Stanley Jackson, a dealer ' at 
Sceptre, has sold out his interests 
in that town. 

The Yorkton Steel & Machinery 
Co. was recently incorporated at 
Yorkton. 

A. W. Lindgren is reported to 
have sold out his implement busi- 
ness at Edam . 

Kerrs, Limited, an automobile 
concern, has been incorporated 
at Brandon. 

W. A. McCarthy reports a fire 
loss in his automobile business at 
Port Moody. 

J. J. R. Funk has discontinued 
his implement business at 
Grunthal. 

A meeting "bf the creditors of 
Tractioneers, Ltd., Winnipeg, was 
held recently. 

C. E. Gillespie, Melfort, has 
sold out his auto business to O. E. 
Montgomery. 

S. Crystal is owner of a garage 
and automobile repair business at 
Brandon. 



Bennett & Lamont, automobile 
dealers, at Moosomin, have dis- 
. solved partnership. 

P. Holdal have retired from the 
automobile firm of McNeely & 
Holdal, at Darmody. 

W. S. Wart, Calgary, has sold 
out his automobile business to 
R. L. Sullivan. 

The Midway Garage, Edmon- 
ton, has been taken over by L. 
Kapperberg. 

Carl Ahlstadt has sold out his 
automobile business at Raymore 
to Lamar Bros. 

A. Marshall & Son suffered fire 
loss recently in their automobile 
store at Westlock. 

The Agler Body Co. is in- 
corporated at Regina with a 
capital of $20,000. 

Thos. Wilson, an auto dealer, 
at Elphinstone, died the latter 
part of December. 

E. L. Appleby has opened^ an 
automobile and accessory busi- 
ness at Champion. 

The Canadian Rotary Floor 
Garage Co. has been incorporated 
at Fort Frances, Ont. 

Stephens & Londry have dis- 
solved partnership in their auto 
business at Minnedosa. 

W. E. McKenzie is a new im- 
plement man at Vermilion, where 
he bought out L. H. West. 

Ben. Burger, an accessor}- 
dealer at Three Hills, is advertis- 
ing his business for sale. 

G. M. McAuley, harness dealer 
at McAuley, has taken a son into 
his business as a partner. 

Partnership has been dissolved 
in the Webb-Barford Machine 
Company, at Kamloops, B.C. 

North West Farmers & 
Threshers, Ltd., is a new com- 
pany incorporated at Sceptre. 

W. R. Mulroy is the latest ad- 
dition to the implement fraternity 
at Runnymede. 

Leroy H. West has sold out his 
implement business at V ermilion 
to W. E. McKenzie. 

Martin & Fredrickson have 
started a well stocked implement 
business at Castor. 

J. E. Lemay is reported to have 
sold out his implement and tractor 
business at La Salle. 

G. H. Prosser, implement man, 
at Silton, is stated to have closed 
his store in that centre. 

It is reported that the Winni- 
peg Oil Co. have sold out to the 
British American Oil Co., Ltd. 

C. H. Stinson, of the Stinson 
Tractor Co., Superior, Wis., spent 
a few days in Winnipeg recently. 

F. L. McLeod and A. E. Royce, 
have registered partnership in an 
automobile business at Bowsman. 

The Tillers Machinery Co., 



Buying vs. Selling 



There can be no Prosperity 
in either Agriculture or 
Industry unless products 
are being sold. 



HE FARMER 
claims that the 
prices of goods 
should come 



down to correspond with the decline in farm 
products. With farm machinery this may not 
be possible in a day or two — but prices must 
come down sooner or later. 

In connection with many commodities lower 
prices were forced because the public rebelled 
against high prices. They instituted buyers' 
strikes. Diminished demand lead to lower 
prices in order to stimulate buying; merchants 
had to adjust their prices and absorb losses. 

In a period of readjustment such losses must 
be faced. There is no opiate for painless de- 
flation in any line. Possibly the farmer may 
wait for lower prices — may allow his imple- 
ment needs to accumulate. 

The more quickly prices return to normal, the 
more quickly will the implement industry 
readjust itself. Neither farmer nor manufac- 
turer can fly in the face of economic laws. 
Wherever a profit was made, now a commen- 
surate loss must be taken. By sensible buying 
on the one hand, and the lowest possible 
prices on the other, each will help to restore 
normal business conditions. 



18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



.lanuarj-, 192] 



Saskatoon, are reported as having 
assigned their business in that 
city. 

Victor Parkes, a member of the 
automobile firm of Buchnam & 
Parks, Emerson, Man,, died 
recently. 

The Shaunavon Motor Co. is a 
new auto business in the Sask- 
atchewan town of that name.! 

Harling & Leddingham have 
commenced an automobile and 
garage business at Cumberland. ■ 

We regret to note the death of 
William Cranston, a well known 
implement dealer at Clearwater, 
Man. 

The Hardware Dealers' Mutual 
Fire Insurance Co. is a new com- 
pany lately incorporated at 
Regina. 

R. H. Ford has bought out the 
automobile business at Carlyle, 
formerly controlled by D. A. 
Kippen. 

Henry Mette has opened an 
implement warehouse] at Bruno. 
We wish him success in his new 
location. 

The McLean-Burr Auto Com- 
pany, New Westminster, are 
reported to have gone out of 
business. 

The implement stock carried by 
N. B. Webster, at Prince Albert, 
has been taken over by Lundle & 
Peacock. 

O. Schneider is now handling 
electric lighting plants in con- 
nection with his business at 
Estuary. 

Irven & Wetherhill is the firm 
name of a new implement firm 
who have opened for business at 
Freedale. 

The McDougall Co., Winnipeg, 
makers of auto supplies, have sold 
out their plant to the Canadian 
Steam Trap Co. 

E. M. Butts, an automobile 
dealer, at Kinistino, has sold out 
in that town to a firm named 
Coyer & Monroe. 

The charter of the Melotte 
Cream Separator Co., Winnipeg, 
has been revived, according to a 
recent announcement. 

Mrs. M. McLeod, owner of an 
auto business at Marengo, has 
sold out her interests to A. Gandy, 
of the Melville Motor Co. 

The Massey-Harris Co. took 
over their new premises in the 
Gordon McKay Building, at 
Brandon, on January first. 

The Interlocking Cord Tire & 
Belt Co., Ltd., has been in- 
corporated at Toronto. Capital 
is given as $1,500,000. 

Morgan Bros., implement 
dealers at Kindersley, have been 
succeeded by a new firmi named 
Morgan & McCutcheon. 

P. W. Dempster, an automobile 



dealer at Victoria, has sold out 
his interests in that city to 
Cochrane & Borrowman. 

J. A. Rollefson, the popular 
dealer at Swift Current^ has de- 
cided to sell out the hardware 
side of his implement business. 

The Prairie City Oil Co., Win- 
nipeg, has made application to 
increase the capital of the com- 
pany from $250,000 to $500,000. 

The Interior Motors, Limited, 
has been incorporated at 
Penticton to take over the busi- 
ness of the Finch-Patton Motor 
Co. 

J. Cook, manager of the Gilson 
Manufacturing Co., Winnipeg, is 
at present on a visit to the head 
office of his company, at Guelph, 
Ont. 

The Macdonald Bros. Sheet 
Metal & Roofing Co., Winnipeg, 
have made application to increase 
the capital of the company to 
$50,000. 

R. B. Wilkinson, an implement 
dealer, is reported to be selling 
his branch at Forestburg to Mr. 
McCann, of the Forestburg Hard- 
ware Co. 

The Ronald-Smith Cultivator 
Co. has been incorporated at 
Regina. This line will be dis- 
tributed by Western Implements, 
Limited, of that city. 

A change is reported in the 
accessory business of W. J. 
JeflEres & Co., Vancouver. The 
company nowi operate under the 
name of Jeffres & Johnson. 

Our old friend, Hugh Rorison, 
implement dealer at Moose Jaw, 
has been elected alderman for 
Ward 4 in that city. Hugh is the 
right man for a civic position. 

G. C. Weyland, vice-president 
of the J. 1. Case Plow Works, 
Racine, Wis., -spent a day or two 
in Winnipeg during the holidays, 
visiting the Sawyer-Massey Co. 

The Geddes Carriage Works, 
Winnipeg, has been sold to 
Anderson & Smith. J. Geddes is 
now a salesman with the Mc- 
Laughlin Motor Car Co., Winni- 
peg. ^ 

R. E. Emery, an automobile 
dealer at Tofield, died recently. 
The deceased gentleman was well 
known in his town and territory, 
and his death is deplored by many 
friends. 

The Pacific Equipment Co., 
Vancouver, have applied for per- 
mission to change the name of 
the company to the Dominion 
Drag Saw Co., Ltd. They handle 
a line of engine-attached saws. 

T. H. Roney, manager for the 
Minneapohs Threshing Machine 
Co., spent a week at the factory 
at Hopkins, Minn., early in the 
month. Mr. Roney is enthusiastic 
over the new tractor his company 
have on the market. 



The Metal Specialty Co., 
Regina, has been authorized to 
increase its capital stock from 
$10,000 to $25,000. The new 
capital will be used to expand the 
company's production of grain 
cleaning machinery. 

Jas. Arthur, purchasing agent 
for the Stewart Sheaf Loader 
Co., Winnipeg, has been ap- 
pointed one of an arbitration 
committee of three, appointed by 
the International Claims Com- 
mission, which is in convention 
at Brussels, Belgium. 

Clifford Leatherdale, formerly 
agent for the Massey-Harris Co., 
at Clearwater, has taken a posi- 
tion as traveller with the R. A. 
Lister Co. of Canada. Mr. 
Leatherdale will cover territory 
in New Ontario, and in Manitoba, 
as far west as Portage, and south 
of that city. 

J. M. Thompson, manager of 
Beatty Bros., Limited, Winnipeg, 
reports that his company had a 
most successful year during 1920. 
They look forward to record busi- 
ness in the coming season. Mr. 
Beatty, head of the company at 
Fergus, Ont., recently spent a few 
days at the Winnipeg office. 

H. F. Anderson, manager of the 
Anderson-Roe Company, has been 
confined to his residence for the 
past couple of weeks. Mr. Ander- 
son has| not been in the best of 
health of late. He has never fully 
recovered the trying illness he had 
while on a visit to England, a 
couple of years ago. 

D. McLarty, representing- Car- 
riage Factories Co., Limited, of 
Orillia, was on a recent business 
trip to Alberta appointing agents 
for his firm's motor truck bodies. 
Mr. McLarty was in the carriage 
business for some years at St. 
Mary's, Ont. He went on to the 
coast before returning east. 

Robt. E. Bell, manager of the 
R. E. Bell Engine & Thresher 
Co., Seaforth, Ont., was a recent 
business visitor to Winnipeg, 
where he spent a few days at the 
local office. Mr. Bell went west 
to Regina and visited the branch 
in that city. He looks forward to 
a good season and says that the 
factory is busy^ on tractor and 
thresher production. 

At the recent annual meeting 
of the Cockshutt Plow Co., 
Brantford, Ont., E. A. Mott, 
western g^eneral manager, was 
added to the directorate. The 
directors^ of the company now 
are: Col. H. Cockshutt, George 
Wedlake, G. K. Wedlake, Sir 
Augustus Nanton, E. A. Mott, Sir 
Lomer Gouin, H. W. Hutchinson, 
James Adams and F. Perry. 

J. Morcombe, the popular im- 
plement man at Cypress River, 



called upon us recently while in 
the city on business. Mr. Mor- 
combe reports a good year, but 
business quiet at present and 
collections slow. He believes that 
dealers will have to sell for all 
they are worth in the coming 
season so that they may get every 
possible sale in their territory. 

The following travellers for 
the Twin City Separator Co., 
Winnipeg, were in the city during 
the holidays: J. F. Abra, Sask. 
territory; Geo. Hodge, Manitoba 
territory; and O. N. Halgerson, 
Alberta territory. P. J. Grout, 
manager of the company, went 
into conditions very fully with the 
travellers, who are now back in 
the field ready to book a big year's 
business. 

George W. Matheson, who has 
for years carried on a very- 
successful implement business at 
Craik, has sold out in that to-vvn 
to Brown Bros. Mr. Matheson 
spent a fe-w) days in Winnipeg- 
while enroute east, accompanied 
In- Mrs. Matheson. He will 
spend a month or two in the East 
and will return West in the 
spring. Mr. Matheson has not 
made any definite plans for the 
future but is too much a west- 
erner to forsake his old stamping 
ground. During his career at 
Craik he' was a consistent 
advertiser in the local paper. His 
final ad. to the farmers is typical 
of^ the good-fellowship which 
made his so popular with his 
customers. In bold type, on front 
cover space in the local paper, 
George published his final ad., 
which read, "So Long, Fellows." 



Sisal Fibre Lower 



There has been a considerably 
increased consumption of sisal 
fibre in 1920 according to a review 
in Cordage Trade Journal. This 
was due to the relatively low price 
at which it was sold, due to the 
large stocks controlled by the 
Comision Reguladora and its as- 
sociate, the Eric Corporation. 

This has reduced the stocks in 
the United States and Yucatan, 
says the above authority, as the 
current production is nothing like 
what is was a few years ago and 
it is considerably below the maxi- 
mum output that was scored dur- 
ing the palmy days of the Comi- 
sion Reguladora. During 1920, 
many efforts were made to get all 
interested to come to some agree- 
ment that would practically or 
actually re-establish a monoply in 
Yucatan; but thus far none has 
succeeded. Last month the Eric 
Corporation, controlled by bank- 
ers in the United States, made a 
price of six cents. Gulf ports, the 
lowest price that has ruled since 
1915. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



19 



BIG RESULTS w.™ Small Effort 




I^JOHN DEERE 



DOUBLE ACTION 
PONY TRACTOR 



DISC HARROW 



HAS MADE RECORDS IN 
LABOR-SAVING EFFIC- 
IENCY SECOND TO NO 
TILLAGE IMPLEMENT 
NOW IN USE IN NORTH 
AMERICA. 



Models "B" and "K"-7 to 10-ft. Widths, 16-in. Discs 

Can Be Converted Into Double-Action Disc 
Harrows for Either Horses or Tractor 

To disc the soil TWICE over in ONE TRIP is surely a mighty consideration in these days when 
every hour saved cuts a big figure in farm profits. This is done in splendid style by the John 
Deere Double-Action Pony Tractor Disc Harrow and done so that the second discing is done 
before the soil, after first operation, can dry out or get hard. 

In a Model "B" or model "K," by obtaining a rear section and the hitch we furnish for this 
purpose, the implement can be. converted into a double-action horse-drawn or a tractor disc 
harrow. On both sections the draft is directly from the centre of the disc axles. So there is 
no possibility of gang frames being sprung. The front section of the double action is out-throw, 
the rear in-throw, and the rear discs trail between the front discs, leaving the ground perfectly 
level as well as ■ thoroughly pulverized. 

TRANSPORT TRUCKS (single or double wheel) can be had, making it an easy matter to handle 
these John Deere Harrows over rough roads or between fields. These trucks are easily attached 
or removed. They are strongly, made, durable and smooth-running. 

Get our special booklet on this great implement with full 
illustrated directions as to attaching ^Tractor Hitch, etc. 

TRACTOR HITCH 
POWER LIFT 

FURNISHED FOR 

VAN BRUNT 
GRAIN DRILLS 




John Deere - 

VAN BRUNT 

Light Draft 
Grain DriHs 



are the greatest boon in seeding machinery ever intro- 
duced into the business of intensive and extensive 
farming. They are made single or double disc and in 
either case they will complete a perfect job in any soil 
that is capable of being seeded. They will operate in 
gumbo, sticky or trashy soil without choking up or 
clogging. 

In the double disc illustrated, blades are hand- 
straightened. All dents and curves are removed by 
expert saw straighteners, so that each pair of blades has 
a continuous cutting edge just at the right point to 
insure deep and even planting at all times. To prevent 
clogging of discs and choking up of grain in boots and 
tubes, there are two sets of scrapers on the inside. The 
outside scrapers have an adjustable spring tension to 
scrape hard or light according to conditions of soil, and 
can be removed from contact with the discs when 
favorable conditions of soil permits. 

Write us for complete illustrated details of this fine 
seeding implement. 




A BIG SUCCESS 
AS A CONNECT- 
ING LINK 
BETWEEN POWER 
AND IMPLEMENT 

The Van Brunt Grain Drill with Tractor hitch and power lift is the one practical outfit to meet any and all 
grain drilling conditions. Only one man required, to drive the tractor and operate the drill. 

THE VAN BRUNT POWER LIFT insures positive pressure on the furrow openers and a positive lift. A 
slight pull of the trip rope from the tractor seat or any other position lowers the discs into the ground, 
applies the amount of pressure indicated by the adjusting lever and starts the planting; another pull raises the 
discs and stops the planting. 



;.• SPECIAL DESCRIPTIVE BOOKLET ON APPLICATION; CONTAINS A COMPLETE COURSE ON POWER LIFT AND TRACTOR HITCHES :: 

JOHN DEERE PLOW COMPANY LIMITED 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON CALGARY EDMONTON LETHBRIDGE 



Canadian Farm Implements January, 1921 



20 



The Concrete Mixer as a 
Farm Implement 

The implements of a well kept 
farm do not necessarily consist 
altogether of machinery and tools 
for the tilling of the soil and 
cultivation of the crops or the 
reaping of the harvest. These 
are all necessary and the success- 
ful farmer of to-day takes pride 
in his equipment. 

The farmers of Canada have an- 
other problem to face. To be 
successful they must make pro- 
vision for the maintenance of 
their plant. Every large manu- 
facturer knows the value of keep- 
ing his plant, which consists of 

■ 'IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUlillllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUUIIIlf 

How is Your Stock of | 

Bill Heads and | 
Letter Heads? | 

Is it running pretty low? | 

If so write us and find | 
out what is most up-to- | 
date in this line. | 

I We will let you have all | 
I information promptly. | 

I y/^e CTOVEL CO. Ltd. | 

g A Complete Printing Service g 

I Bannatyne Ave. WINNIPEG | 
■iinHiiiiiiiinuiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



buildings, machinery and tools, in 
a good state of repair and most 
of them have what is known as 
a construction and maintenance 
department. 

No manufacturer can be a real 
success who does not make pro- 
vision for the maintenance of his 
plant and equipment. The same 
might be said of the farmer if he 
allows his tools and machinery to 
lie out in the weather and rust. 
If he does not keep them al5 all 
times in perfect order he is a 
waster of his own wealth. Then, 
the erection and maintenance of 
his buildings'[ is one which must 
be well looked after. On many 
farms in Canada the buildings 
equal from one-third to one-half 
the value of the land. If this be 
the case, then how important it 
is that every farmer shall not only 
erect buildings of aj permanent 
nature, but shall look after their 
maintenance by putting them on 
proper foundations and providing 
proper drainage, and keeping 
them well painted. 

Concrete can be used in farm 
buildings to good advantage, 
costing less than wood and mak- 
ing permanent structures. Many 
farmers find it profitable to own 
their own concrete mixer for their 
repair work and for the erection 
of new buildings and foundations. 
There are now on the market con- 
crete mixers designed for this 



class of work that are inexpensive 
and can be operated either by 
hand or a gasoline engine. One 
machine will serve a number of 
farmers. Machine-mixed con- 
crete can be made with less 
cement and costs less to produce 
than hand-mixed. A concrete 
mixer is now no longer a novelty 
to the farmer, but with the intro- 
duction of the smaller size mixer, 
built especially for small jobs, it 
is becoming a necessary par-^ of 
the equipment of many well-kept 
farms. 



The Question of Exchange 



Allowing that in the year re- 
cently ended the U.S. exported 
$84,000,000 worth to Canada 
monthly, and imported from Can- 
ada a monthly total of $49,i000,000, 
the monthly balance of trade in 
favor of the United States was 
$35,000,000. As a result, Cana- 
dian Exchange fell to 84 cents 
on the dollar. 

Therefore we have two tarilf 
walls in the implement business. 
Assuming that a machine has an 
import duty of 37^ or 42^ per 
cent, when we have such, ex- 
change conditions we have an in- 
crease of the duty plus 16 per 
cent. In efifec't, the exchange 
erected a second tarifif wall on 
Canada's frontier of 16 per cent 
on every dollar's worth of goods 



sold us by American firms. 

This can only have one effect 
upon U.S. trade. For example, 
a Canadian merchant when buy- 
ing in New York, receives only 
84 cents worth of goods for his 
dollar. Again, the Canadian dol- 
lar is say 13 per cent above par 
in the British marikets, so that 
if he buys the same kind of goods 
in Liverpool he receives $1.13 for 
one hundred cents. Whatever ex- 
change does, it cannot be said to 
stimulate trade, in fact, it in- 
creases depression in business. 

The fellow who can eliminate 
the factor of exchange will be a 
benefactor to humanity — and then 
some. 



U,S. Tractor Production 



In an investigation made by the 
Bureau of Public Roads, United 
States Department of Agricul- 
ture, of the production of tractors 
in the United States during 1919, 
reports from 80 manufacturers 
show that they manufactured a 
total of 164,590 tractors during the 
year. The number actually 
manufactured during the year 
was only a little over one-half of 
the total production estimated by 
the manufacturers. Of the trac- 
tors produced 22,012 were 16^ to 
18 belt h.p. and 94,653 were 20 
and 22 belt h.p. Over 17,000 were 
27 to 32 h.p. at the belt. 



Washing Machine Firm Opens 
Branch 



R. J. Dinwoodie, western man- 
ager of the Blue Bird Corpora- 
tion, announces that his firm will 
open a warehouse and establish 
a western sales office in Winni- 
peg. The Blue Bird Corporation 
manufactures the "Colonial Maid" 
electric washer, in its factory at 
Brantford, Ont. Mr. Dinwoodie 
stated that branch warehouses 
will be opened in Calgary, Sask- 
atoon and Vancouver. 

This Canadian company makes 
all parts for its machine in the 
faqtory at Brantford, Ont., with 
the exception of the motor, which 
is made by Westinghouse in the 
factory at Hamilton. 

U.S. Holding Census of Farm 
Equipment Production 

A census which will show the 
number and value of different 
items of farm operating equip- 
ment manufactured in the United 
States during 1920, the number 
sold in 'the United States, and the 
number sold for export, is being 
undertaken by the United States 
department of agriculture. In- 
formation Avill be collected from 
the manufacturers of farm imple- 
ments .vehicjes aild other equip- 
ment. 



Dealers:— Here^s Your Opportunity 
to Stimulate the Demand 




WESTERN DEALERS will be interested in a list of Implement 
Specialties, Painted Wagon Woods, etc., now being issued by 
D. Ackland & Son, Ltd. It covers lines which for quick sale are 
being listed at prices much below replacement values, and dealers 
who receive it will find many items in it which they can buy greatly to 
their advantage in the matter of price. 

If you have not received a copy, a post card will put you 
in touch with this money-making opportunity. Address: 



D. ACKLAND & SON LIMITED 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



January, 192i 



Canadian Farm Implements 



21 



U. S. National Tractor Show 



The Sixth National Tractor 
Show will be held at the State 
Fair Ground, Columbus, Ohio, 
February 7 to 12. It is stated 
that practically every booth under 
preparation for the show has been 
leased. The total floor space 
equals more than three acres. 
Eight buildings, including the 
Coliseum, will be used. Every 
available foot of space will be in 
use for the educational display 
of machinery and appliances. 
Dealers and manufacturers will 
have displays of tractors, tractor 
accessories, farm tools, power 
farming machinery and other 
equipment. The show will be an 
educational exhibit instead of a 
sales proposition as many of the 
tractor .shows of the past have 
been. 



Canada's Potato Crop 



The 1920 potato harvest for the 
whole of Canada is represented 
by 138,527,000 bushels from an 
area of 784,544 acres, as compared 
with 125,574,900 bushels from 
818,767 acres in 1919. The aver- 
age yield per acre for 1920 is 



1763^ bushels, which compares 
with 1533^ bushels last year and 
with 146 bushels, the decennial 
average for the period 1910-19. 
The total yield and the average 
yield per acre are the highest on 
record for Canada. By provinces, 
the yield per acre of potatoes is 
well over the decennial average 
throughout the Maritime Prov- 
inces, Quebec and Ontario. The 
to'tal value to farmers of the 
potato crop for Canada is esti- 
mated at $134,693,000, as com- 
pared .with $118,894,200 in 1919. 
the price per bushel ranging from 
65 cents in Prince Edward Island 
to $1.39 in Manitoba. For Can- 
ada, the average price per bushel 
is 97 cents as against 95 cents 
last year, for Quebec it is 93 cents 
as against 85 cents, and for 
Ontario it is 96 cents as against 
$1.37. 



U.S. Implement Exports 



Figure^ issued by the U.S. 
Department of Commerce show 
that the farm implement, exports 
for the first nine months of 1920 
were, in value, $35,284,396, com- 
pared with $34,798,271 during the 
corresponding period of last year. 



There was an increa.se in the ex- 
ports of hay rakes, tedders, plows, 
cultivators and threshers, and a 
decrease in mowers, reapers, 
planters and seeders 

During the nine-month period 
52,297,670 pounds of binder 
twine valued at $7,951,977 were 
exported. This was an increase 
of 12,000,000 pounds and about 
$700,000. 



Clearer Contracts Wanted 



A resolution passed by the 
Wisconsin Implement Dealers' 
Association commented on the 
present form of sales contracts 
in vogue. It said in part : 

"The present method of dis- 
tribution of goods from manufac- 
turer and jobber to dealer-s we 
believe makes it unnecessary to 
have a long mystifying form of 
contract. We believe that imple- 
ment dealers are not benefited by 
these contracts, and in many cases 
are handicapped and hampered in 
many ways. Therefore we ask 
the manufacturers and jobbers of 
farm machinery to give this 
matter their careful consideration, 
to the end that we may have a 
form of contract that will be clear 



and concise, without mystifying 
clauses, and eliminating many of 
the features that were necessary 
when business was done on a 
commission basis." 



A Lady Manager 



Miss Grace Harvvood has been 
appointed manager of the John 
Deere Plow Co. at Bloomington, 
111., succeeding the late F. J. 
Savage. Miss Harwood has been 
connected with the establishment 
for the past eight years as stenog- 
rapher, and during a portion of 
that time as assistant manager. 
Her ability to handle the business 
following the death of Mr. Savage 
w nn her the appointment. 



Offer Stock to Employees 



The Plymouth Cordage Co., 
North Plymouth, Mass., has made 
an ofifer to its employees of 25,000 
shares of $10 par value stock at 
$20 a share, to be known as 
employees' special stock. This 
will be entitled proportionately to 
the same dividends and disburse- 
ments as the $100 par value stock 
i)f the company now commanding 
a price of $230 a share. 




Keep Busy the Year Around! 

During 1921 the dealer will have to handle lines that assure a steady demand if he is 
to be assured a profitable turn-over. You can contract for no better line than G. S. M. 
Made-in-Canada Farm Equipment. 

We manufacture: Beaver Kerosene Tractors, "Ideal" Windmills, "Maple Leaf" 
Grinders, "Ideal" Kerosene Engines, Concrete Mixers, Steel Saw Frames, Power and 
Hand Pumps, Pumping Equipment, Steel Tanks, etc. We also handle Plows and Threshers. 

Branlford Type "K" Kerosene Engines 

2, 4 and 7 h.p. — Canada's Leading Farm Engine 

With the Type "K" you can double your engine trade this year. Sell at popular 
prices, with a nice net profit for you. Dependaible, easily operated. Every engine is 
guaranteed to develop excess horse-power and to positively not overheat running to full 
capacity all day burning kerosene. A great fuel saver. The "Brantford" has few working 
parts. Fuel tank is in engine base, magneto ignition, accurate governor and speed changing 
device. Write for particulars. 



"Maple Leaf" Grain Grinders 

Made in 6 to 15-inch sizes 
Immense Capacity— Do Perfect Work 

You can sell them easily. They have been known and 
preferred by users for over 20 years. They contain 
many exclusive points of real merit which are protected 
by patents. Specially designed, extra strong, and well 
built, allowing high speed and largely increased output. 



The "Ideal" Double Geared 
Pumping Windmill 

— the simplest double-geared windmill made. Its 
roller and ball bearings insure running in lighter breeze 
and minimum amount of lubrication. Many "Ideal" 
Windmills are giving perfect satisfaction after 15 years' 
continuous service. The "Idear* double-braced and 
double-girted tower is the strongest windmill tower 
made. Never blows down if properly erected. We 
furnish capable windmill experts to install complete 
outfits, if required. 




Announcing the 1921 Model 15-30 Beaver Tractor 

With our new improved 15-30 H.P. Beaver the dealer has the tractor opportunity of a lifetime. In addition to 
the .excellence of Beaver construction, the seven-speed friction transmission, the new Beaver has a larger 
motor, 5x6^ inches, which develops 50 H.P. on the belt. With remarkable surplus power the Beaver is the 
best "buy" on the 1921 tractor market. We ofifer the trade an exceptionally attractive commission and quantity 
discount. Handle the Beaver. Made in Canada — no duty — no exchange — hence a reasonable price. Write to-day 

for the most profitable tractor sales proposition in existence. 
- Secure territory NOW. 

m 



V Bramtford 



i«uuiiiiiH..l!!!:. 




For Agency particulars and literature, address 




Goold Shapley & Muir Co. Limited 

Distributing Warehouses: Portage la Prairie, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon 



Factory— Brantford Western Head Office— Regina 



HilllliKiiiiiMiiiiiiSiwiBaBmiMllHIinBilHH^ 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Automatic Grain Pickler 

— REDUCED TO $6.75 — '■ 

Made by Currie Manufacturing Co., Brandon, but furnished 
with metal pail instead of wooden one. 

We are discontinuing all implements, and to move these 
immediately are offering at far below cost price to us. 
Single lots, $6.75; or lots of six or more, $6.00 each., 

TERMS, CASH—F.O.B. MOOSE JAW 

Canadian Specialty Co., Moose Jaw 




Tractor Company Open New Service Station 

In business circles the dominant and widely expressed belief is that the North 
American continent has rarely, if ever, faced a more hopeful outlook than it does 
! in the dawn of 1921. 

I This feelino is shared to the full by Canadian Tillsoil Farm MotoiS, Limited, who 
' have recently opened a fine new Avarehouse and service station in Winnipeg 
where a complete stock of machines and repairs are available. The new premises 
are at 40 Harriet Street (as shown in the idiotoorapli i . and will be found a 
convenient rendezvous to which every fiirui machinery expert or pupil is cor- 
dially invited when visiting the city. 'This new service station is directly in res- 
ponse to the needs of the growing business of the •Tillsoil" Company. With this 
new equipment, together with their Kegina ser\ ice station, Tillsoil dealers and 
customers are asriured of the very best service for the 1921 .season. 

The ■Tillsoil" is a Canadian machine, manufactiu-ed at Amherst, N.S., and is 
backed by over a million dollars of Canadian capital. It has already proved its 
mettle under many and widely diversified tests, according to the manufacturers, 
to the complete satisfaction of owners. 

Profits are no longer to be made by the obsolete nietlio*ls of the all-horse farm 
or by any application of imassisted human labor. 

The secret of all future success lies in the machine that is at once adequate and 
not wasteful. There is machinery to be had that will successfully deal with the 
worst that is ever likely to crop up in Western Canada. The "Tillsoil", it has 
been said, belongs to this class, and with the opening of the season the company 
look forward to a strong demand for this all-Canadian tractor. 



Quick Moving Lines Pay the 
Dealer 



In times likt- tliese. when the 
farmer, if he l)uy.s at all. wants 
credit on all large goods, it is 
vitally important that the dealer 
concentrate on the sale of imple- 
ment specialties, wood goods and 
similar fast selling lines which 
can lx> sold for cash. Sttch lines, 
for which a steady demand exi.sts, 
mean revenue to the store, and 
are of real assistance in tal<ing 
care of the dealers overhead. 

We note that D. .\ckland & 
Son Ltd., ^\'inni])eg. are meeting 
the readiustment situation by 
i s s u i n g a new list. These 
prices quoted, in many items, 
awav below replacement values 
afford the dealer a splendid 
chance of doing profitable btisi- 



ness this spring with cjuick turn- 
ox er and good profits. Copies 
of the list may 1)6 had from D. 
Ackland & Son by dealers who 
are interested in the sale of this 
class of goods. In implement 
specialties and wood goods the 
trade have a line that is in demand 
the year around — a deinand that 
should be cultivated durinig 1921. 



Carriage Factories Making 
Truck and Car Bodies 



Carriage Factories, Limited, of 
Orillia. Ontario, are going ex- 
tensively into the manufacture of 
all kinds of bodies for motor 
trucks of different makes, in ad- 
dition to the manufacture of 
bodies, open and closed, painted 
and trimmed complete for 
pleasure cars. They are devoting 




a; Quality Engine at 
a Quantity Price. 

Made in 5 Sizes . 
Write for Catalogue 

LONDON 6AS POWER CO. LTD. 

York St. London Oni. e 



their Orillia plant to these lines 
entirely and have made consider- 
able changes in their production 
eqttipmeiit there. 

The carriage and cutter output 
of the company have been re- 
moved to the plant in Alexandria, 
Ontario, and in Montreal they are 
carrying on the manufacture of 
harness exclusively instead of 
carriages, blankets, harness, etc., 
which were inade there up to two 
years ag^o. 

Canada Second in Motor 
Production 

Canada is now the second 
country in the world to manufac- 
ture automobiles. The automo- 
bile industry- in Canada now rep- 
resents a capital value of $50,000,- 
000 and employs 15,000 people. 
The annual pay-roll exceeds 
$15,000,000. During last year 
the sales of the Canadian-made 
automobiles amounted to more 
than $100,000,000, which is a con- 
vincing testimony to the Cjuality 
of the cars produced, and is a 
great credit to those engaged in 
the industry. 



It requires nerve, determination 
and foresight, to- blaze a trail. 



EMERSON 



Step on the Pedal 
and It Starts! 



"HAFA-HORS" 

ENGINES 

The only self-starting farm 
engine in the world. Just 
the right size and power 
for operating Fanning Mills, 
Grain Graders, Washers. 
Pumps, Churns, Cream Sep- 
arators, Water Supply Sys- 
tems, etc. Saves time and 
labor in house or barn. Costs 
less than 3c. an hour to 
operate. Weighs only 62 lbs. 
Dimensions, 16 x 14 x 14 
ins. Show it — it sells itself. 
Ask for prices and literature. 
Don't delay. 



EMERSON WILD OAT 
SEPARATORS 




Two Sizes 




No other machine 
takes every kernel of 
wild or tame oats out 
of wheat or rye, sav- 
ing all the wheat. 
Adopted as a 
standard tester by 
t h e U.S. Federal 
Grain Co. in all their 
elevators because of 
its perfect efficiency. 

Order Your 
Spring Stock 



EMERSON MANUFACTURING CO., Ltd. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



1425 WHYTE AVENUE 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



23 




Here It Is! 

The New H 



A Little Brother to the 

They are going to do team work for Hart-Parr deal- 
ers in 1921 and they are a pair that's hard to beat. 

Some Choice Territory Still Open 
For Live Wire Dealers 

THE CONTRACT is based on the idea that your interests as 
well as ours must be protected. It's a "two-sided'' contract. 

DISCOUNTS large enough to satisfy any reasonable dealer — 
much better than anything we have been able to offer heretofore. 

FINANCIAL PLAN— Our plan of depositing funds in the deal- 
er's local bank with which to finance sales of our tractors has been a 
sensation, and has enabled our dealers to handle sales where competi- 
tors could not. 

TERRITORY as large as you can handle in a manner satisfactory 
to you and to us— large enough that you can go about selling tractors 
in a serious-minded way and get profits in return for your efforts. 

A PRICE GUARANTEE that protects both the dealer and the 
farmer. The farmer purchaser is to be refunded the difference in price 
should we be able to lower the price between now and June 1st, 
1921, and the dealer to be refunded if any tractors purchased within the 
price guarantee period are on hand unsold. 

A TRACTOR that needs no introduction, built by the Founders 
of the Tractor Industry— two popular sizes, the three-plow 30 and the 
two-plow 20. 

Drop us a line today stating what territory you are interested in 

HART- PARR COMPANY 

Founders of the Tractor Industry 

218 Lawler St. Charles City, Iowa 



yhio 

Show 




Grab the 
Hart-Parr 
contract — 
if you 
can get it 




Many of the old Hart- 
Parrs that plowed the 
virgin prairies of the 
Northwest are still in 
use today. The great 
grand - daddy of all 
Tractors was old 
Hart-Parr No. 1, built 
in 1901. 



3 - PLOW- POWERFUL STURDY KEROSENE TRACTORS - 


2 -PLOW 












r 


BUILT BY 


-FOUNDERS OF TRACTOR INDUSTRY -BUILT B^ 



24 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Sawyer-Massey Take Over Dis- 
tribution of Wallis Tractors 



H. W. Hutchinson, vice-presi- 
dent of the Sawyer-Massey Com- 
pany, Limited, Hamilton, Ont., 
announces that the Sawyer- 
Massey organization have secured 
the exclusive sale in Western 
Cainada of the Wallis tractors, 
and the full line of power tillage 
implements, as manufactured by 
the J. I. Case Plow Worksl Co., 
Racine, Wis. 

This tractor and line of trac- 
tor tools will be handled through 
the western branches of the 
Sawyer-Massey Co., in addition 
to their own well known line of 
tractors, threshers and road ma- 
chinery. Full 'Stocks of machines 
and parts will be carried at all 
the western branches of the com- 
pany, so that dealers will be 
assured prompt delivery of all 
their requirements of the Wallis 
line and J. I. Case Plow Works 
tillage tools. 

This new sales arrangement 
which will be of the utmost im- 
portance to the dealers through 
out the Canadian West, was 
closed the latter part of Decem- 
ber. The Western branch 
managers of the Sawyer-Massey 



Co. were in convention at the 
Winnipeg offices of the company, 

and we nt vprv h-ilUr 



Wallis and the line of power farm- 
ing implements, along with a 
corps of experts from the factory, 
at Racine. 



The following managers held 
a conference with Mr. Hutchinson 
the week of December 30th: 

John Robertson, Winnipeg 
branch; W. J. Fuller, Regina 
branch; W. Perry, Saskatoon 
branch, and A. J. Balfour, man- 
ager at Calgary. 

• Along with Mr. Hutchinson the 
western executives analysed 
future trade policies and lined up 
their sales plans for the coming 
season. The company are very 
optimistic as to future trade and 
anticipate a good year's business. 

Mr. Hutchinson stated that the 
factories at Hamilton would turn 
out over 2,500 separators to meet 
the 1921 demand. In the past 
two years, under the supervision 
of Mr. Hutchinson, the output of 
the plant has been increased 
enormously^ Even at this early 
date they have several hundred 
machines manufactured ready for 
1921 business, and the factory is 
working at full pressure. 

The Sawyer-Massey Co. are 
now selling a very large number 
of their well known threshers to 
the trade in the United States. 
They manufacture for the J. I. 
Case Plow Works, Racine, who, 
after carefulj investigation con- 
sidered that the Sawyer-Massey 



threshers were the best machine 
they could distribute in con- 
junction with their Wallis trac- 
tors and line of power farming 
implements. 

The Sawyer-Massey Company 
are also doing a large export trade 
and recently sold anj order of 
$80,000 worth of road machinery 
,to Jamaica. Mr. Hutchinson 
hopes to be able to return to 
Winnipeg about the beginning of 
April, but will visit the factory 
four or five times a year so as to 
keep in contact with production 
conditions. The marked develop- 
ment of this pioneer company is 
a distinct tribute to the energy 
and executive ability of Mr. 
Hutchinson. 



Gray Tractors Prove Popular 



A. Prugh, manager of the Gray 
Tractor Co. of Canada, Winnipeg, 
announces that the company had 
a most satisfactory year during 
1920. Mr. Prugh recently re- 
turned from a visit to the various 
trade centers throughout the 
West, where he made arrange- 
ments for the provincial distribu- 
tion of the Gray tractor during 
the coming season. 

J. W. Gray, president of the 



The New Wonder 

THE ONE PERFECT WILD OATS SEPARATOR 

Manufactured in Winnipeg and Minneapolis 




it is so efficient 
in cleaning the 
wild oats out of 
wheat; and other 
grain that it will 
even clean the 
wild oats out of 

THE GbOD OATS 



That's the BIG, EXCLUSIVE ADVANTAGE of the "NEW 
WONDER" over other grain cleaners and separators. It succeeds where 
others fail. It actually does clean out the wild oats, something no 
other separator or fanning mill had ever done before, because it works 
on a different principle. 

It gets the dust, dirt, scrubs, foul seeds and other foreign matter 
out of your grain as well as your WILD OATS. It is in every way a 
high-grade cleaner, combining the best features of other fanning mills, 
grain cleaners, and separators with our EXCLUSIVE PATENTED 
FEATURE OF SEPARATING WILD OATS. 

There is no other machine in its class for quick, easy, thorough 
results. 

Investigate the claims of the "NEW WONDER." It has been on 
the market for several years and has demonstrated its superiority over 
other makes. Test it out in comparison with similar machines, and see 
with your own eyes that the above statements are true. 

We are now placing Contracts with Dealers. Write 
immediately as this ad. may not appear again 

The New Wonder Manufacturing Co. 



Canadian Factory: 
416 CORYDON AVE., WINNIPEG 



American Factory: 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



Big Reduction 
In Price 

New prices have been set for 1921, write for lower 
prices now. New prices show reductions up to 
15% on FARMER JONES PACKERS, and up to 
25% on Wood Goods 




WOOD GOODS 



STAR 
PLOW 
SHARES < 




We can make prompt shipment 
on all Wood Goods. Our lines are 
reliable and well an4 favorably known. Write for new prices 

List of 
Wood 
Goods 

Whiffletrees 
Doubletrees 
Neck Yokes 
Wagon and 
Implement 
Evener Sets 
Wagon 
Reaches 
Adjustable 
Wagon 
Tongues 
Crated 
Wagon Sets 
Wagon End 
Gates 
Boss 
Harrows 
Diamond 
Harrows 
Harrow 
Teeth 
Wild Oat 
Separators 
Mower and 
Binder 
Repairs and 
Supplies 



Order Early 

If your order reaches 
us early we can likely 
include your ship- 
ment in a carload lot 
effecting you a big 
saving in freight 
charges. 



We have a big assortment on hand of these Superior 
Shares and can fill all orders promptly 

FARMER JONES PACKERS 



are money makers for 
farmers because their 
use makes a noticeable 
increase in the quantity 
and quality of the crop, 
and they are profit 
makers for dealers who 
have them on hand 
when they are asked for. 
Write for full informa- 
tion and new price. 



F. G. WRIGHT & CO. 



72-74 Henry Ave. 




Winnipeg 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



25 



Gray Tractor Co., Minneapolis, 
paid a visit to the Winnipeg 
branch recently, and reports the 
factory busy. Many Gray trac- 
tors are being sold abroad; a 
large order hasj been booked for 
central Europe and also for 
Portugal. 

The Gray tractor has been on 
the market for three years in the 
Canadian West, and from the 
large number of testimonials that 
Mr. Prugh has received from 
Gray owners it is evident that this 
tractor is giving the greatest 
satisfaction wherever used. He 
reports that from the data given 
by records the repain expense is 
phenomenally low. Users seem 
enthusiastic over the design and 
efficiency of their machines, and 
the Gray feature in design, .which 
permits hitching of gangs of im- 
plements from the draw-bar and 
side arms. This tractor, as 
dealers know, has a wide drive 
drum which eliminates packing of 
the soil and permits the farmer to 
gfet on the softest and wettest 
soil. In fact, says Mr. Prugh, the 
Gray will travel in land where the 
plows will hardly, work because 
the wheels sink so far owing to 
conditions. With a capacity for 



four or five plows, and for any 
separator from 34 to 36 inches, 
the Gray is a size of machine 
which appeals to the agriculturist. 

The company look forward to 
a busy season in 1921 and are now 
closing arrangements with dealers 
in western territory. 



Guarantee Against Price 
Decline 



A New Power Unit 



The I.eRoi Company of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., makers of the 
LeRoi 4-cylinder motor which is 
used as standard equipment on a 
number of motor cultivators, light 
tractors, wagon loaders, pumps 
and contractor's equipment has 
announced the completion of a 
4-cylinder power unit which will 
be marketed as a complete power 
plant. 

It consists of a standard LeRoi 
4-cylinder engine with standard 
rating of 15 h.p. and weighs only 
750 pounds. It is complete to the 
last detail, with radiator, fan, 
carburetor, magneto, air cleaner, 
transmission and two 10-inch 
drive pulleys operating at right 
angles. 



In order to extend your credit, 
pay promptly. 



Many industries, the implement 
industry among others, are giving 
to their dealers certain guarantees 
against price decline, which make 
it safe for the dealer to continue 
to do business in the usual man- 
ner and yet feel assured that any 
radical change downward in price 
is not going to place unusual 
burdens upon him. These price 
guarantees extend to periods 
which approximate the end of the 
sales season for the goods cov- 
ered, and furnish the dealer a 
cushion which relieves him from 
the possibility of seridus loss and 
places this burden upon the manu- 
facturer. This plan has many 
advantages, particular among 
which are : 

First : The protection of the 
dealer so that he will take stocks 
in at the usual time and be pre- 
pared to serve his farmer cus- 
tomer in the usual way. 

Second : The obligation placed 
upon the manufacturer to bear the 
burden of price declines, so that 
he will be conservative in his 
attitude towards the dealer and 
not endeavor to sell him more 



goods than the trade can reason- 
ably consume. 

In other words, this guarantee 
aginst price decline insures an 
even operation of factories and a 
steady flow of goods to the 
farmer, so that stocks sufficient 
in quantity may be available for 
the latter's use when the time 
comes that he needs them. 

Arguments favoring the prac- 
tice from the wholesaler's and re- 
tailer's standpoints are as follows : 
it protects them against loss due 
to a falling market ; permits early 
orders; avoids delays in ship- 
ment ; insures ample stocks to 
meet unusual demands ; permits 
ordering in large lots to save 
freight : permits placing orders 
more freely ; responsibility for 
fixing prices should rest on the 
manufacturer because he is better 
posted concerning the prices of 
raw materials and primary 
markets; wholesaler's margin of 
profit is too small to risk market 
reductions; permits the handling 
of goods on a smaller margin, 
and therefore makes lower prices 
to consumer. 



"I guess so" is the reply of a 
failure. 




British 
Built— 
British 
Quality 
2, 3, 
5, 7 
and 
9H.P. 



LISTER Farm Engines 




With "LISTER" Lines 

Good Business is Assured the Dealer 

—LISTER Engines Sell the Year Around 

British built, and to the British standard of durability. The best materials and best 
workmanship. High tension ignition — no batteries. Automatic lubrication. Economical 
to run. Shipped complete with skids. Lister engines are what the farmer wants. Sell 
them this spring and make money. 

--LISTER Grinders have Great Capacity 

We guarantee Lister Grain Grinders to grind more feed on the same power than any 
grinder of the same size on the market. Heavy steel shaft with extra long bearings 
gives durability and rigidity. Ball thrust bearing. Large feed trough; ample screening 
capacity. Strong, reversible plates with worm force feed. All machines are fitted with 
bagger pulley. Sold with or without base. 

--The Complete LISTER Line Includes: 

"Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene Engines, Grain Grinders and Crushers, 
Electric Lighting Plants, "Melotte" and "Lister-Premier" Cream Separators, Milking 
Machines, Churns, Ensilage Cutters, Silos, Sawing Outfits, Pumps, Pump Jacks, Power 
Pumping Outfits, etc. 




Cream Separators 

12 Sizes: Capacities, 280 to 1,300 Lbs. 



We can make imntediate delivery of all sizes. The "Melotte" bowl is self- 
balancing and frictionless. Hangs free from a ball-bearing spindle. In con- 
struction and skimming efficiency the "Melotte" is the World's Foremost Separator. 




LISTER Grinders 

Five Sizes. 6 to 12-lnch Plates 



"LISTER"-the World's Leading Milker 

Our 1921 model is the last word in milkers. Lister milking machines ' 
have been in use all over the world for 15 years. Made in single or 
double units. Simple in design. An ordinary 1^1 h.p. engine or motor 
will operate them. The Lister Pulsator gives a perfect release of the . 
teats. The cups cannot fall off, and the stroke of the pulsator can be 
altered instantly to suit the individual cow. 

DEALERS — Send for special literature. Let us show you how you can 
get the milker trade by handling the famous Lister machines. 

IS YOUR TERRITORY OPEN? IF SO, WRITE AT ONCE 

R. A. LISTER & CO. {Canada) LIMITED ^ 




MELOTTE Cream Separators 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 



LISTER Milking Machines 



26 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Lauson Mfg. Co. Announce 
New Three-Plow Tractor 



The John Lauson Mfg. Co., 
New Holstein, Wis., announce 
their new high-powered Lauson 
12-25 h.p. tractor. This, says the 
company, is a machine with 
quahtyi built into every detail, 
produced on a quantity basis, 
enabling the company to quote 
the low list price of $1,595. 

The new Lauson develops -30 
h.p. at the belt and 20 h.p. at the 
draw-bar, according to the manu- 
facturers. It is a three-plow job 
with plenty surplus under average 
conditions. The weight is 4,300 
pounds, not too heavy to pack but 
with weight sufficient for good 
traction. A wide range of speed 
for belt work and plowing is pro- 
vided. Plowing speed is 2 to 3% 
miles per hour. Easily handled, 
it has a turning radius of 12^ 
feet. 

There are no untried features 



in the new machine. The general 
design is the same as the larger 
size, 15-30 Lauson tractor, which 
so efficiently demonstrated its 
correctness by the remarkable 



England last fall, foremost trac- 
tor authorities awarded the Lau- 
son first prizes in class three — 
gold medal and cash award — 
which is proof the general design 




The New High-Power Lauson 12-25 H.P. Tractor. 



performance on hillside work at 
the Walla Walla tractor demons- 
tration. Again at the competitive 
Lincoln tractor trials, held in 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER'S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
district. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



of the Lauson tractor is along the 
right lines. 

Twenty-three Hyatt and Tim- 
ken, roller and ball bearings give 
the 12-25 Lauson the same full 
jewel movement so famous in 
the Lauson 15-30 size. This con- 
struction reduces friction to the 
minimum and increases horse 
power at the belt pulley and 
drawbar. 

All gears, including the final 
driving gears, are enclosed in 
dust-proof housing and operate in 
a bath of oil. In fact, mechanical 
improvements and refinements 
are noticeable throughout the 
entire quality construction. 

The company claim that the 
new Lauson tractor can be oper- 



The Biggest Bull Dog of Them All ! 

For the Large Farm or Small Elevator 
Easily Driven and Easily Sold — In Demand Everywhere 

DEALERS: For capacity and perfection of separation this mill dominates 
any grain cleaner sold. For cleaning seed this spring, and the crop next 
fall, it is your customer's best investment. The 64-inch Bull Dog Mill is 
equipped with a double auger conveyor, heavy babbitted boxes and double 
eccentrics. Very strong construction. Better built than any mill ever put 
on the market. 

Get the Agency — You Get the Trade — 

ACT NOW! 




BULL DOG 
MILLS 

Made in Bve 

sizes : 
24, 32, 40, 48 
and 64 inch 
sieve widths 

Capacities : 
25 to 150 
bushels per 
hour 



Note double auger conveyor ; one 
64-inch Bull Dog with Screenings 



Handle Canada's largest line of grain 
cleaners this year. Get Bull Dog prestige 
behind your business and very attractive 
profits are yours. Write for full details. 

THE BULL DOG LINE 

Includes: FANNING MILLS, ELEVATOR 
CLEANERS, WILD OAT SEPARATORS, 
SMUT MACHINES, ETC. 

The Twin Gity Separator 
Company Ltd. 

QUELCH STREET, WINNIPEG, MAN. 

for screenings — one for seed grain Address all correspondence from Southern and 

Central Alberta to R. W. DOW, Box 1406, 

Sacker and Wagon Box Elevator caigary, Alberta. 



ated cheaper on gasoline than 
kerosene. Taking the relative 
cost of the two fuelsi they show 
that the average operating costs 
of a tractor run for ten hours on 
gasoline is $6.14 — with kerosene 
$7.15— at U.S. fuel cost. 

The Power Plant 
The Lauson 12-35 has -a four- 
cylinder, valve-in-head engine, 
with good design and ample 
dimensions in all parts. A 
pressure oiling system is used, 
also the well-known Taco ball- 
bearing governor. A Taco 
syphon air washer and cellular 
radiator of ample size arej other 
features. The transmission is 
selective type, sliding gear, fully 
enclosed. Belt pulley is 16 x 7 
inches ; at normal engine speed it 
runs at 650 r.p.m. On low the 
Lauson "12-25 runs at 2 to 2j^ 
m.p.h. ; on high at to 3% 
m.p.h. A stationary and swing- 
ing draw-bar permits the correct 
hitch for aJny type of implement. 



Discontinue Catalogue 
Business 



A report states that the. United 
Grain Growers, Winnipeg, will 
discontinue the sale of their farm 
machinery and farm equipment 
lines by the catalog route, which 
they have used since the inception 
of this department. It is stated 
that the Grain Growers are ap- 
pointing agents to represent their 
lines in the towns and villages 
throughout the West. Where 
p-ossible they will appoint their 
elevator men the local machine 
agents, and failing this will place 
their machinery for local sale 
with agents who they will appoint 
to handle the goods they dis- 
tribute. 



Tudhope-Anderson Sell by 
New Route 



The Tudhope-Anderson Com- 
pany, whose headquarters are at 
Orillia, Ont, have, it is reported, 
made a change in their method of 
handling the lines they manufac- 
ture. In future the company will 
sell by catalog direct to the 
farmer, according to reports. For 
many years, as western dealers 
know, this line has been sold, 
through the trade. It is alleged 
that the change in the system of 
merchandising is in an effort to 
place their goods cheaper in the 
hands of the farmers than the 
company consider would be 
possible by selling through 



If you haven't a business slo- 
gan get your gray matter or that 
of someone else to work for you, 
and adopt one that will feature 
your name, location and main 
line. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



27 






INTERNATIONAL 
MACHINES AND SERVICE 



E are over the threshold of the new year. The 
International agents will go on distributing 
the machines of this Company in the provinces 
of Canada. The International Harvester pro- 
ducts give them the only complete line of farm 
machines sold in Canada — and it is a line founded on 
nearly a century of experience, and trusted among farmers. 
International machines sell with minimum effort', to 
farmers who know the advantages of investment in proved 
lines. The man who sells them profits by simplified 
handling of repairs, by freight saving and by association 
with world-famous International Service, which cements 
relations among this Company, its agents and the farmers. 

The International Harvester Company of Canada 
Ltd., has sixteen large branch houses conveniently located 
in the best agricultural sections of Canada, which supply 
over 3,500 local agents with repair parts, twine, and 
emergency shipments of machines and implements when 
customers need things in a hurry. These various facts 
are full of meaning and opportunity for any International 
agent and for any man who will sell International 
machines in the future. Write the nearest branch for 
any desired information. 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 

OF CANADA ltd. 
HAMILTON, CANADA 

WESTERN BRANCHES:— Brandon, Winnipeg. MAN.; Calgary, Edmonton, 
Lethbridge, Alta.; Estevan, N. Battleford, Regina, Saska- 
toon, Yorkton, Sask. 
EASTERN BRANCHES:— Hamilton, London, Ottawa, Ont.; Montreal. 





r 



The Full Line of 




THERE ARE 16 CANADIAN 
BRANCH HOUSES. SEPVING 
OVER 3,500 DEALERS, SO 
THAT YOU MAY BE SERVED 
PROMRILY V\/nH MACHINES, 
BINDER TWINE AND REPAIRS 




INTERNATIONAL HARVESrtR 
M'CORMirK(fH:i)Etl^lNG 
rarinOiH'mliiitj Equipment 
Motor Trucks 
Tractors 
Engines ' 



AGENTS, IN CONVENIENT 
REACH OF EVERY FARM. 
SELL INTERNATIONAL 
MACHINES AND STAND BAa 
OF THE PURCHASER WITH 
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 



28 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Describing the New Hart-Parr 
20 Tractor 



A new model of tractor has 
been announced by .the Hart-Parr 
Company, Charles City, Iowa — 
founders of the tractor industry — 
and will be known as the Hart- 
Parr 20, two-plow tractor — the 
"little brother" of the famous 
Hart-Parr 30. Experimental rrta- 
chines have been in the field for 
the past year and have passed 
through stringent tests before 
being ordered into production. 
The factory started limited pro- 
duction of the Hart-Parr 20 Jainvi- 
ary first, and will gradually in- 
crease the schedule until July 
first when it will be turned out 
in quantity production. 

The new tractor will be handled 
through the same sales organiza- 
tion as now handles the Hart-Parr 
30. The Hart-Parr 20 will be 
firs't publicly shown at the 



PETERS PUMP5 



Give More Water 
in Less Time with 
Less Energy 



Made in many styles and 
sizes, they will meet all re- 
quirements of the Western 
Canadian farmer. 




PETERS' 



Double Cylinder 
Force Pump 

is the last word in pump 
service. Unequaled in De- 
sign, Action and Durability. 
They are different from all 
other pumps in construction 
and finish, and have ex- 
clusive features that make 
sales easy to customers who 
want the BEST in pump 
value. 

Dealers : 
Get Peters' 

Pump 
Proposition 
for 1921 



Our line is absolutely up-tb-date 
in every respect. Every pump we 
produce is given special attention. 
Peter's Pumps are perfectly as- 
sembled — they have no "come- 
back." Sell them and you make 
satisfied customers. 

A POST CARD WILL BRING 
OUR LATEST CATALOG. 

Manufactured by 




Exclusive Canadian Agents : 

Tudhope Anderson Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg Regina Saslutoon Calgary 
Write Nearest Branoh Houee for 
Partlouiare. 



National Tractor Show at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, in February, where the 
company has secured space for an 
extensive educational exhibit in 
which the new tractor will be the 
center of interest. Display trac- 
tors will go forward to distribu- 
tors' and dealers' floors shortly 
after the first of the year. 



operating successfully in the 
hands of their owners. It is not 
to be wondered at, therefore, that 
the Hart-Parr Company should 
follow this same design in their 
newer models. 

The Hart-Parr "20" and "30" 
have been standardized so that 
the design of the new tractor 



burning system, which features a 
kerosene shunt for burning the 
fuel cold under load and heated 
when under no load ; a spur gear 
transmission, which is very ac- 
cessible ; a cast steel frame giving 
the tractor a solid bed on which 
to operate ; a contracting band 
clutch, which gives a maximum 




Showing the relative size of the Hart-Parr "20" Tractors as compared with the Hart-Parr "30". 



It is interesting to know from 
the specifications given us and the 
photographs sent us that in this 
latest design the Hart-Parr Com- 
pany has retained the funda- 
mental features of design shown 
in their earliest models, fifteen to 
twenty years ago. Their firs't 
tractors used a heavy duty, two- 
cylinder, slow speed motor. The 
Hart-Parr Company claim that 
many of these earliest tractors — 
17 to 20 years of age — are still 



follows very closely that of the 
Hart-Parr 30, which is so well 
known to the trade. In fact, it 
might be said that the parts of 
the "20" are reduced in proportion 
to the power requirements from a 
three-plow tractor to that of a 
two-plow job. 

As one looks at the Hart-Parr 
20 he sees the well known Hart- 
Parr fea'tures, such as the two- 
cylinder, horizontal, slow-speed 
engine; the special kerosene fuel 



FOR BETTER BUSINESS— 

AND BIGGER PROFITS 

^gTAR FITTED PLOWSHARES! 

*** X'^OHi&S -m GUARANTEED 

highest quahty 
materials and per- 
fect in fit and finish. 

When you sell a STAR 
share you create a sat- 
^ isfied customer. 

Shares for Practically 
Every Plow. 

Ask your Jobber 
for "Star" fitted 
Plowshares and 
latest Share 
lists. 





A re-inforced 
landside 
strengthens 
the welds. 




JOBBERS 
Wilkinson - Kompass Ltd., 

Winnipeg 
F. C. Wrigiit & Co., Winni- 
peg 

J. H. Ashdown Hardware 
Co., Winnipeg, Saskatoon, 
Calgary 
Western Implements Ltd., 

Regina 
Metals Ltd., Calgary and 

Edmonton 
Western Canada Hardware 
Co., Lethbridge 



Star Manufacturing Co. 

CAEPENTERSVILLE, ILL., U.S.A. 



ease of control ; a belt pulley 
mounted on the crank shaft ex- 
tension on the left side of the 
tractor, making it very easy to 
back the machine into the belt ; 
a floating drawbar adjustment 
allowing for even operation of 
"implements over rough and hilly 
ground. 

The new tractor weighs only 
3,800 lbs., yet it carries a heavy 
duty, two-cylinder engine with 
5j4x6^-inch bore and stroke, 
which at normal speed of ^00 
r.p.ni. has actually tested better 
than 25 hor^e power. This is a 
very generous surplus over the 
20 horse power rating. Surplus 
power has always been a feature 
of Hart-Parr . tractors, giving 
them the ability to handle peak 
loads without difficulty. Among 
other features are the eccentric 
bushings for the rear axle allow- 
ing close adjustment of the final 
gears ; the steel cast bull gears ; 
the one piece of transmission gear 
case, furnishing ready accessibil- 
ity and giving additional stififness 
to the tractor at that point, and 
the steady rest plain bearing 
located next to the differential 
gear, thus avoiding any possibil- 
ity of shaft deflection. AH bear- 
ings in the transmission are of 
the anti-friction type. The water 
pump is driven directly off the 
governor and magneto shaft. A 
new feature is 'the enclosing of the 
entire valve mechanism as well 
as the valve operating push rods, 
which are located in tubes con- 
necting the crank shaft to the 
valve lever housing. The lubri- 
cation of the mechanism is carried 
on through these tubes by the 
breathing action of the crank case, 
thus affording excellent lubrica- 
tion at all times. 

The engine of the Hart-Parr 
20 tractor is comparatively, light 
weight, weighing but 900 lbs. It 
is a valve-in-head type with two 



January. 1921 Canadian Farm Implements 29 



cylinders, making 800 r.p.m. at 
normal speed and is cast in one 
block and bolted to the crank 
case. Diameter of the valve is 
IJi inches with a lift of ^ inch. 
The water jacket is especially well 
designed, giving excellent circula- 
tion through the head and around 
the valve stems. A heavy crank 
shaft is used, having two main 
bearings which are 2y^ inches in 
diame'ter by four inches long. 
The timing gears are attached to 
the crank shaft and enclosed on 
the right side of the crank case. 

An enclosed centrifugal gover- 
nor is used and is located on the 
top of the engine, being driven 
directly off the magneto shaft. 
The water pump is attached to 
the right end of the governor 
shaft, giving a very compact ap- 
pearance to both pump and gover- 
nor. This design requires only 
one stuffing box for the pump 
and no pump bearings are re- 
quired. A bronze sleeve is used 
on the pump shaft where it 
passes through the pump shaft to 
prevent rust. The carbure'tion 
system is the famous Hart-Parr 
shunt in connection with a 1%- 
inch carburetor. The tractor is 
designed to burn kerosene under 
all conditions. The system is by 



Leading Features in the 
Hart-Parr "20" 



Horse power rating — 20. 

Horse power maximum — 25. 

Cylinders — 2, S^^-inch bore by 
6^-inch stroke. 

Governed speed — 800 r.p.m. 

Main bearings — 2^-inch diam- 
eter by 4 inches long. 

Connecting rod bearings — 2^ 
inches diameter by 23^ inches 
long. 

Valves^l^ inches clear diam- 
eter by 3^-inch lift. 

Carburetor — 1J4 inches in com- 
bination with Hart-Parr shunt. 
Overall Dimensions 

Rear wheels — 46-inch diameter, 
10-inch face. 

Front wheels — 28-inch diam- 
eter, 5-inch face. 

Weight, tanks and radiator full 
—3,800 lbs. 



gravity from a fifteen gallon tank. 
Gasoline is used only for starting 
purposes. The standard Hart- 
Parr cooling system is used, con- 
sisting of a cellular radiator with 
storage tank. The fan is friction 
driven of¥*the flywheel. The high 
tension magneto is used for igni- 



tion and lubrication is fresh oil 
by force feed from a six lead oil 
lubricator. 

While following very closely 
the design of the Hart-Parr 30, 
an improvement has been made 
by an underslung design. The 
rear axle, which is of the full 
floating type passes through ex- 
tension brackets which are cast 
into the steel frame in the rear. 
The front axle is mounted ahead 
of the frame so as to have plenty 
of room to oscillate. Limit stops 
are cast' into the front of the 



frame as integral parts of it. The 
front axle is a flat steel bar built 
up Elliot type. The tractor is 
designed to run with two wheels 
in the furrow while plowing. The 
inner end of the wheel hub is 
large in diameter so that a large 
wearing surface for the end thrust 
is provided. Power is delivered 
to the rear wheels through an 
accessible spur gear transmission. 
The conventional Hart-Parr in- 
ternal driving gear system is used, 
which ensures delivery to the 
drive wheels of maximum power. 



TILLSOIL 18-30 

With Power Like 
A Steam Engine 



Will Make a Big Cut in Farm Production Costs 




TILLS THE SOIL WITH OIL 

The "Tillsoil" is backed by a million dollars 
of Canadian capital and with a factory having 
facilities for manufacturing better than five 
complete machines per day. 

With its unusual reserve power and exceptional 
economy in fuel and oil consumption, the 
"Tillsoil" is guaranteed to "make good" on 
any farm.- 



TO DEALERS. — Agencies are now being closed for this high- 
class, big-selling Farm Engine. Get in on it while your 
territory is open. Write us anyway. 



Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors Limited 

WESTERN HEADQUARTERS: 

46 HARRIET ST. (Cor. Harriet and Notre Dame), WINNIPEG 




Clean Grain and 
Clean Profits 

Follow the sale of the 

"NEW DUAL 
CLEANER and 
SEPARATOR 

Immense capacity. Does better 
work in less time. Reduces the 
heaviest mixtures in ONE RUN 
at a rate that would require two 
ordinary mills. Cleans and sep- 
arates twice as fast as the best 
fanning mill of the same size ever 
made. 

One Operation Cleans the Dirtiest Mixture 

The double gangs and cut-off system are the secret of New Dual efficiency. Get a 
New Dual on your floor. Prove our claims for yourself. Show the farmers how 
this mill does finished work, in a few minutes, on any combination of dirty gram. 
No middlings— no half-and-half mixtures— but PERFECT SEPARATION of Wheat. 
Barley or Oats. Complete sieve and screen equipment with every mill. To show 
it is to sell it, and the New Dual gives the dealer a better margin of profit than 
the average mill. Let us tell you about it. 

Sell the Western Pulverizer, Packer 

and Mulcher 

It Guarantees Bigger Yields 

and Earlier Crops 
A Size for Every Farm 

PLOW PACKER— 2 ft. S in. two- 
furrow; 4 ft. three-furrow. 

SINGLE SECTION— 4, 6, 8, 10 
and 12 ft. sizes. 

THREE SECTION— 11, 15 and 21 
ft. sizes. 




It saves all 
the moisture 



"Western" Pulverizers have revolutionized agriculture. They are different from 
any other machine on the market. Pulverize, pack and mulch the soil in one opera- 
tion, giving a seed-bed that conserves all available moisture. Wherever used, they 
have given bigger, sturdier yields and earlier harvests. They eliminate loss through 
dry seasons. Get your spring requirements — NOW. 



4ito 20 
H.P. 



CUSHMAN 

LIGHT-WEIGHT 
ENGINES 

For all Power Purposes 

More power per pound. Compact 
design. Steady running. No Cush- 
man weighs more than 60 ' pounds 
per horse-power. Our 8 h.p. is the 
best general purpose engine your 
customers can own. Ask for litera- 
ture, prices and our attractive sales 
offer. 

Dealers: Get Full Particulars on these Fast Sellers 

Cushman Motor Works of Canada, Limited 

Builders of light weight, high grade Gasoline Engines for all Farm Power Work 

DEPT. C.F., WHYTE AVE. AND VINE ST. WINNIPEG, MAN. 




30 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



Minneapolis Threshing 
Machine Co. Have New 
Tractor 



The Minneapolis Threshing 
Machine Co., Hopkins, Minn., 
announce a new model tractor 
rated at 17-30 h.p. This tractor 
is a developmet of the Minne- 
apolis 12-25 h.p. It is now on the 
market and was very severely 
tested in 1919 and again in 1920. 
In announcing the new Minne- 
apolis the company believe they 
offer a machine that will meet 
with the approval of farmers and 
dealers throughout Canada. 

The Minneapolis 17-30 tractor 
weighs 6,000 pounds ready for 
shipment or about 6,400 pounds 
ready for worik in the field. The 
motor is a 4-cylinder, vertical, 
valve-in-the-head with 4^-inch 
bore and 7-inch stroke. It is of 
their own make and has removable 
inner cylinder walls. The motor 
speed is 775 r.p.m. extreme length 
of tractor, 11 feet, extreme width, 
6 feet 2 inches. Drivers are 54 
inches high, 12-inch face, low 
gear speed is 2 miles per hour, 
high gear speed 2.7 miles per 
hour with the mo'tor running at 
its normal speed of 775. The belt 



pulley has a diameter of 15)^ 
inches and the face is 7% inches. 
The belt pulley being located on 
the crank shaft, has, of course, 
the same speed as the motor. 
Every gear is enclosed in oil-tight, 
dust-proof housing. Auto type of 
front axle is used ; clutch lever 
controls the power by a twin disc 
clutch in the belt pulley. The 
tractor is equipped with a foot- 
brake, operating on the reverse 
shaft, Dixie Magneto, Bennett 
Air Cleaner, Kingston Carburetor 
and S & J Radiator is standard 
equipment. Wheel base is 6 foot 
yji inches. The rear axle and 
transmission gear shaft bearings 
are Hyatt rollers. The outer 
ptilley bearing is double row self- 
aligning SKF ball bearing. 

The tractor is constructed in 
three units ; the front casting- 
carrying the front axle and parts, 
the rear casting which is the 
transmission housing as well as 
rear axle housing and the center 
casting which is the cylinder 
block itself. These parts are ma- 
chined and bolted together, also 
tied by a casting attached to the 
front part and the rear part, which 
casting carries the spring draw 
bar attachment. The front end 





...^ .wland with a charm- 
ing all-year climate, tempered by 
the ocean breezes. Mildest of winters with 
flowers blooming out-of-doors in December. 

A thousand miles of excellent touring 
roads, ideal for motor traffic or riding. 

Vancouver Island is the 

GOLFER'S PARADISE 

with a fine selection of courses. 

Travel by C.P.R. in comfort and see the 
CANADIAN PACIFIC ROCKIES 

In Their Winter Garb 
TWO TRAINS DAILY 
Call or write to any agent of the Q (XDCLCl 10.11 





of the tractor is spring mounted, 
special heat regulating manifold 
makes it possible to vary the heat 
supplied to the carburetor and a 
suction water valve automatically 
feeds water to the carburetor ia 
proportion to the power being 
developed. This tractor is in- 
tended to handle three plows 
under all conditions that are at 
all favorable as well as the 28-inch 
cylinder Junior Thresher. 

The rating of 17-30 h.p. seems 
conservative, for the 4-cylinder 
valve-in-head motor has cylinders 
4-j4x7 inches, with a governed 
speed of 775 r.p.m. With a weight 
of 6,400 lbs. and 4,400 static 
weight on drivers, the machine 
should be able to develop from 
3,000 to 3,500 lbs. pull at reason- 
able plowing speed without ex- 
ceeding a pull to weight ratio of 
50 to 60 per cent, which practice 
and tests have shown to be about 
the maximum that can be ob- 
tained by any type of tractor 
under field operating conditions. 

x\ special feature of the new 
Minneapolis tractor is the dust- 
proofing arrangement of the steer- 
ing knuckles. Still another very 
worthy detail of design is the 
method of lubricating the engine 
valve-racker-arms. The breather 
from the crankcase is a cored 
passage up to the cylinder head. 
This incloses the rockers, which 
are lubricated by the mist of oil. 
In addition to this, auxiliary hand 
oilers have been placed on the 
rockerarm bearings. 



New Milker has Single Hose 
Feed 



Avery Announce New Straw 
Governor 



The Avery Co., Peoria, 111., 
announce that as regular equip- 
ment with Avery "Yellow- 
Fellow" and "Yellow-Kid" separ- 
ators they will supply their new 
duplex-automatic straw governor 
which automatically controls both 
the amount of straw fed into 
cylinder and the amount of straw 
that is delivered to the carrier by 
the feeder. ~ The governor is 
actuated by the volume and con- 
dition of the straw. 

The feature of the governor is 
an adjustable .throat between the 
cylinder and the retarding fingers 
and, acting automatically, pre- 
vents the cylinder from slugging 
or wrapping. It also automati- 
cally stops the carrier from throw- 
ing straw into the feeder until 
what is already there is taken care 
of by the cylinder. The entire 
working of this governor is auto- 
matic without any dependence on 
the speed of the cylinder — the 
action is determined only by the 
amount and condition of the 
straw. 



In contrast to milking ma- 
chines with two or more tubes 
from the teat cups to the pail, a 
milker has been developed with 
but one feed tube. The pulsator, 
the ingenuity of which makes 
this simplification possible, is 
located in 'the branch connection, 
under the udder, this position 
making the teat cups more quick- 
ly responsive. The pulsator can 
be easily removed, disassembled, 
and cleaned. The familiar alter- 
nate action is used. 



It requires some mathematical 
ability 'to sell goods on a 10 per 
cent margin when your overhead 
is 18 per cent. 



Subscribers' 
Information Service 

Under this heading we will reply 
to enquiries . from jobbers and 
dealers concerning the location of 
machine manufacturers, where re- 
pair parts may be obtained, etc. 
Endeavor always to give name of 
manufacturer. For immediate re- 
ply, enclose stamped, addressed 
envelope. Send enquiries to In- 
formation Department, CANADIAN 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, Winnipeg. 



H. A., Sask.-^Grain;' grinder with 
following parts: Balance wheel R203; 
plate casing E-51 and R52; casting E,17 
and 18. These are parts for a grinder 
handled by the Tudhope-Anderson Co. 
Write the Regina branch for repairs. 

H. Bros., Alta. — The grain stacker you 
refer; to is made by the Christiansen 
Plarrow Works, Sioux Falls, S.D. It is 
a harvester with attached circular bin 
in which the bundles are set and then 
dumped in thej form of a stack. The 
International Harvester Co., manufac- 
ture a stooker for attachment to 
binders. 

J. C. R.", Sask.— Thej "Daisy" feed 
grinder is manufactured by Beatty Bros., 
Ltd., Fergus, Ont. Repairs are carried 
at the western branches of the company. 
The Winnipeg brancli have shipped you 
a set of 12-inch plates as required. 

L. B. P., Sask. — You can procure a set 
of 7-inch plates for a type "M" grinder 
for a "Chicago Airmotor from William 
Eddie, farm machinery distributor, 
Princess St., Winnipeg. 

R. & Co., Sask. — Grinder with plates 
G-4 is one of a line handled by the John 
Deere JPlow Co. You can get new plates 
from the John Deere Plow Co., Regina, 
Sask. 

S. & G., Sask. — The Climax B ensilage 
cutter is manufactured by the Bateman- 
Wilkinson Co., Toronto. No repairs are 
carried in the West. Write the factory 
for required parts. 

A. A., Sask. — The only firm we know 
of who can supply ice plows on short 
notice is the J. H. Ashdown Hardware 
Co., Winnipeg. We have asked this firm 
to forward you particulars of four 
different plows they handle. 

C. M. W.t Man.— The Sylvester gas 
engine for railway use is manufactured 
by the Sylvester Mfg. Co., Lindsay, Ont. 
Write the factory. No stocks are carried 
in the West. 

S. L. M., Sask. — A heavy duty steel 
scrub cutter is 'manufactured by J. R. 
Eagle, Dauphin, Man. This machine is 
claimed to handle 4 to 12 acres daily. 

C. E., Alta. — Part XI 13 is a cap, and 
SB273 boxing for wheel of a Deere and 
Mansur disc harrow. You can secure 
the parts through the Calgary branch of 
the John Deere Plow Company. 



January, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



Canadian Pacific Railway 
New Sixty - Ton Hopper 
Bottom Box Cars 



THERE is now on order for the 
Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company 3,500 of the new 
sixty-ton hopper bottom cars which 
the company had hoped to have 
available for grain handling this fall, 
but owing to delay of contractors 
in getting material only a few have 
been received. 

Two features which make this new 
equipment particularly suitable for 
service on a road with a heavy grain 
traffic stand out strongly in the 
design of these latest box cars now 
being built for the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. The limit load which the 
cars will carry is 60| tons, the floor 
having 8p>ecial hopper bottom which 
is designed to facilitate unloading of 



bulk material and to eliminate the 
need for temporary grain doors. 
The new cars are 40 ft. 6 in. long, 
SJt. 6 in wide and 9 ft. high inside. 

The cars are built with steel under- 
frames, steel side frames, corrugated 
steel ends and outside metal roofs. 
All carline flanges are covered with 
strips of wood arranged to prevent 
the accumulation of dust that might 
be shaken down from time to time 
and possible damage the lading. 

Hoppers of the Burnett type are 
located at the side door opening on 





Interior of car with Hopper closed 



each side of the car. When used for frei^t 
that cannot be dumped through the hopper, 
the car has a solid level floor the same as an 
ordinary box car. When grain, coal, etc., are 
to be loaded the specially constructed sec- 
tions of floor over the hoppers are turned 
up against the side door post. This arrange- 
ment allows the load to go directly into the 
hoppers, and also saves considerable t^a- 
porary floor lumber. When the cars are 
unloaded it is only necessary to remove the 
pin that locks the hopper doors; the doors 
open quickly by gravity. 

Special care has been taken to obtain a 
side door of satisfactory design. The inter- 
locking front and back edges are exceptional 
protection against weather and pilfering. 
The top edge is weather proof, yet so arranged 
that it cannot become blocked with ice. The 
bottom of the door is fitted with turned 
rollers that fit on a very substantial and 
rigidly supported track. 

The trucks are of the standard arch bar 
type with improved truck columns, spring 
plank and truck column fastenings, pinless 
brake beam, hanger brackets and four point 
brake beam suspension. This type of truck 
has given the best satisfaction of any so far 
used by this railway. 



New 60-ton box car with Hopper Bottom now being built for Canadian Pacific Railway 





Floor section raised for grain loading 



The Hopper when open discharges the load outside the track 



Canadian Farm Implements 



January, 1921 



New Problems in Tractor Sales 



Advertised Tractors 



Oil Pull 

AdTsnca Kum«ly Threiber Co. 

Canadian 

Albert* Fotmdrj Co. 

Aultman & Taylor 

Aultman & Tsylor Maehmary Co. 

Avery 

Arary Co. 

Bates steel Mule 

Batei Machina & Tractor Co. 

Imperial 

Robert Bell Kngina A Thresher Co. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Tractor Co. 

Case 

Gate, J. I. Threshlnc Machine Co. 

Waterloo Boy 

John Deere Plow Co. 

Eagle 

Eagle Mfg. Co. 

All Work 

Electric Wheel Co. 
Oeo. White & Son* 

E. B. 

Emerson Brantingham Implement Co. 
Anderson Roe Co. Ltd. 

Fordson 

Ford Motor Co. of Canada Ltd. 

Gilson 

Gilson Mig. Co. 

Beaver and Ideal 

Goold, Shapley & Muir Co., Ltd. 

Gray 

Gray Tractor Co. 

Hart-Parr 

Hart Parr Co. 

Holt Caterpillar 

Holt Mf£. Co. 

Huber 

Huber Mfg. Co. 

International Titan & Mogul 

International Harvester Co. 

Happy Farmer 

La Crosse Tractor Co. 

Lauson 

Lauson, John T/Ug. Co. 

Ciuhman Motor Worlct of Canada Ltd. 

Macdonald 

Macdonald Thresher Co. 

Massey-Harris 

Massey Harris Co., Ltd. 

Twin City 

Minn. Steel & Machinery Co. 

Monarch Neverslip 

Monarch Tractors Ltd. 

Nichols & Shepard Oil Gas 

Nichols & Shepard Co. 

Plowman 

Plow Man Tractor Co. 

Heider 

Bock Island Co. 
Waterloo Mfg. Co. 

Samson 

Samson Tractor Co. 

Sawyer-Massey 

Sawyer Massey Co., Ltd. 

Wallls Cub 

Wallis Tractor Co. 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse 



TRACTOR prospects for 1921 call for caution and fore- 
sight but certainly do not justify pessimism. The 
reasons for tractor sales are sound. Stronger sales 
efforts and the highest quality will be required and these 
combined cannot fail to produce results. Lower produce 
prices demand lower production costs. Labor-saving 
machinery on the farm is more than ever a necessity. 

Farmers Must Buy 

Farmers will be investing, not freely spending, money 
this year. They cannot stop buying. Caution will be 
exercised and only well known quality-proven tractors, such 
as are advertised in The NoR'-West Farmer, will be 
purchased. This condition is favorable to big sales by the 
dealer handling a tractor that has won the confidence of the 
best farmers in his district by wide publicity in Western 
Canada's oldest and best farm paper. 

The Value of Reputation 

A dealer's reputation is made by the goods he handles. 
The easiest way for a dealer to discover the quality and 
worth of a tractor is to find the volume of advertising that 
supports its sales and the amount of that advertising that 
is reaching his customers direct through a well-read farm 
paper. No poor tractor could be widely advertised for any 
length of time. 

The tractors listed on this page are sold by firms who 
advertise consistently to The NoR'-West FARMER readers. 
Leading tractor manufacturers will continue to use big 
space in 1921, backing up their dealers' efforts throughout 
the year. Dealers can tie up to these lines with good 
assurance of tractor sales success. 



It pays to keep tab on advertising in THE NOR'- WEST 
Farmer. One dollar brings it for one year. 



TheNorrWbst 



The Pioneer 
Farm Journal of 
Western Canada 



Farmer 



Winnipeg 



Canada 



VOL. XVII., No. 2 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, FEBRUARY, 1921 



BtTBSCBIPTION PRICK IN CANADa| \n'^^^ 



An Advantage 

to Farmers 



Ae the pkmeer Bank in Western Canada, we are bankers 
for the United Grain Growers, tbe United Farmers of 
Alberta, the Saskatcliewan Co-operative Elevator Company, 
and other rimllar institutions. 

Oonsequently, individual farmers find it a distinct advan- 
tage to transact their business through this Bank. 

UNION BANK OF CANADA 



HEAD OFFICE 



WINNIPEG 



450 



YOU CAN ^tS^ 

Fire Premiums 50"! 

, Our Hardware Companies have returned 60% of the premium 
paid (based on board rates) to United States EEardware and Imple- 
ment policy holders since 1908. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK. MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life Bldg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alb«rta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 

JNStmANCE IN FORCE OV£R $218,000,000.00 

NET CASH STTRPLTTS - OVER f 1,800,00&00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOBONION OF CANADA $ 1601,000.00 

REFERENCEl BANK OP MONTREAL. WINNIPEG 



SeU WATSON'S HARROWS 




Hi: 

WATSON'S BOSS WOOD HARROWS 

^nteee fianvws are made of seasoned hardwood. Each tooth securely set by two 
rivets. Fitted with malleable draw clevis. They are harrows of correct design. 
Have exclusive features. Easy sellers. Sizes: 78 Tooth, 14 feet; 102 Tooth, 
17 feet; 150 Tooth, 24 feet; 174 Tooth, 30 feet; 222 Tooth, 38 feet. Consider no 
statement that yon can get harrows "just as good" as Watson's. There is but 
«M Watstm. Order it from ns. 

Pa;^ us a Visit during Winnipeg Bonspiel 

W« wifi be glad to have yon can and look over the complete Watson Line. 
Address yonr mail in onr care. Take Logan Ave. West car to Chambers Street. 



A Full Line of REPAIRS for 
MOLINE and JANESVILLE Implements 

Moline Plows Moline Disk Harrows 

(Best Ever, Good Enough, etc.) (EcMMiay) 

Mandt Wagons and Farm Trucks 
Manure Spreaders Monitor Drills 

(National and Mandt) 

Moline Universal Tractors Moline Engine Gangs 
Adriance Binders, Mowers and Rakes 

Also Repairs For 

Janesville Pkws, 
Disc Ham>ws, etc 



SEND us YOUR 
REPAIR ORDERS 




311 CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



Ronald-Smith Cultivators 




7%e Best Cultivator on this Continent 



n OIVSS UNIFORM CULTIVATION— Tfaia aieaM a better aeed bed. 
IT WILL NOT CLOG— Ju«t think of it. 

IT HAS A SHEAR THAT WILL DO THB WORK— And a little more. 
It faas a frog to support tbe shear wing with quantity and quality of material that 
•aaUM ns to gnatantec .that h wlB stand up to tbe work you put it at and do that 
work with ease. 

Ag^neit open /or thh maeMne — Writ^ befora it U too late. 

Western Implements Limited 

«TH AVE. A 8CARTH ST. - - - REGINA, SASK. 



Mutual Aelp 

is the root idea of NUfe Insurance. Men join togetber that 
ALL may bear without disaster, loss that would fall with 
crushing weight upon one alone. ' ^ ; ..; 

Obtain particulars of this helpful alliance. While yoi|'^K,V; 
doing so, procure particulars of THE BEST THERE IS in Lif^ ' 
Insurance. And the best policies— :by the proof of ACTUAt ' . 
RESULTS— are those of 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

DEPT. " P 16 " 
HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEO 

A poBtal vrtU bring full information by mail. Stata age. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1^ 





Make 1921 Your Biggest Year 

By Selling 

Jumbo Farm Engines 



Jumbo Strong Points 

Perfect Mixer 

A. specially designed mixer gives 
a perfect, uniform fuel supply 
with either kerosene or gasoline. 

Oteillating Magneto 

Webster oscillating magneto 
gives a hot fat spark in all kinds 
of weather. 

Btuy Starting 

Positive fuel supply and perfect 
ignition make quick starting 
easy and sure. 

Potitipe Governor 

Positive governor gives even speed 
iioder all loads. More power 
when needed and then only — 
savQS f u^. 

Auxiliary Valve 

An auxiliary valve does away with 
title fuel pump and keeps plenty 
Ojf fuel in the inlxer. 




Jumbo Farm Engines will help you 
to build profitable new business this 
year — just as they have helped other 
dealers in the past. 

More than 100,000 Jumbo Farm 
Engines are working for farmers — 
chosen because they stand up under 
the exacting service of farm work. 

Your customers get satisfaction from 
the goods they purchase or they buy 
elsewhere the next time. You may 
safely count on Jumo Engines to 
deliver the reliable power — sure, 
quick starting; economy of opera- 
tion — that brings repeat-order satis- 
faction. 

Look over the Jumbo Strong Points, 
a partial list of the features which 
have made thousands of friends for 
Jumbo Engines, and many customers 
for Jumbo dealers. 



Active dealers who plan to get their share 
of 1921 business will find the Jumbo line 
of engines a big help. Write to-day for 
descriptive literature. 



NELSON BROTHERS COMPANY, Saginaw, MidL,U.S.A. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3 





Drawing made from photograph showing battery of Case 22-40 H. P. tractors working near Oskaloosa, lowc. 
Case 10-18 and 15-27 tractors can be equipped with rubber tires for municipal and industrial work. 



A Spring Sales Opportunity Too Good To Overlook. 



Case Road-Building 
Machinery 

Steam Road Rollers 2 sizes 

Rock Crushers 2 sizes 

Mounted Rock Bin 

with Screen 15-ton 

Road Graders 3 sizes 

Road Drags 3 sizes 

Road Rooters — (Iron 

or Steel Beam) 275 lbs. 

Road Sprinkler 12 Bbl. 



ALONG about this time "live" implement dealers everywhere 
are lining up prospects for new farming equipment with 
^ which to handle the spring work on time. Case dealers 
are energetically working up sales for Case Kerosene Tractors, 
Grand Detour Tractor Plows and Tandem Disc Harrows. If 
you are a Case dealer don't overlook, however, that other great 
opportunity for spring volume — the sale of Case Road-Building 
Machinery. 

The breaking up of winter will leave many roads in your com- 
mvmity in bad condition — both country roads and city streets. 
Naturally you are interested in seeing such roads and streets im- 
proved. Perhaps your influence will help to this end. Inciden- 
tally, as a Case dealer you should exert your sales ability to 
indicate the most economical and efficient method of bringing . 
about such improvement. By doing this you will be benefiting 
your commvmity measurably, and at the same time you will be 
taking advantage of a spring sales opportunity for Case machin- 
ery that is too good to overlook. 



J. 1. Case Threshing Machine Company 

Dept. B 216 - Racine, - Wisconsin 




NOTE: We want the public 
to know that our plows and 
harrows are not the Case 
plows and harrows made by 
'he J.I. Case Plow Works Co 



4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 




COCRSHUTT 

Power Lift Drills 

Save much time and a lot of work. Discs or Shoes rise auto- 
matically at ends of furrow and enter the ground again 
instantly the clutch is tripped. Pressure can be increased or 
decreased as readily as on an ordinary drill. 



NOTE THESE FEATURES:— 



Ample strength to stand up to the hardest 
service. 

Extra large capacity grain boxes with steel 
covers. 

Light draft due to careful design and 
thorough lubrication. 

Easy to operate either from footboard or 
from seat of Tractor. " 



Tractor Hitches supplied for 20 and 24 sizes 
when wanted. 

Single Discs, Double Discs, Drag Shoes or 
Hoes, all interchangeable on same frame. 

Cockshutt Seed Drills are supplied in 12, 
14, 16, 20 and 24 sizes— each with 6" 
spacing between the furrow openers. 



A Cockshutt contract gives you a COMPLETE line, manufactured in Canada, in one of the 
largest and best equipped factories and backed by many years of successful advertising and 
service to Canadian farmers. It's THE line it pays to push. 

Let us send you our new Dealer proposition to-day. 

Cockshutt Plow Co. Limited 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



Vol. XVII., No. 2 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, FEBRUARY, 1921 



SuBscEiPTiON Price in Canada ( '{5°" 



Winnipeg Bonspiel — Bigger and Better Than Ever 



Once again we have the month 
of February with us and the joys 
of good sportsmanship that it 
brings. VVinnipeg will be a 
centre of interest in the holding 
of the greatest event of its kind 
in the world, the 33rd Annual 
Bonspiel. An informal reception 
will be held on Monday evening, 
the 7th, at which the draw for 
the opening event (The Dingwall 
Trophy) will be made and 'the 
announcement as 
to the rinks drawn 
to play in the first 
round. Tuesday 
morning,, 10 o'clock, 
the first games will 
commence and 
there will be some- 
thing like 50 sheets 
of ice in use. From 
then on, old ac- 
quaintance will be 
renewed new ones 
made, and for ten 
days one of the 
cleanest and most 
popular of winter 
sports will hold 
sway. Rinks from 
Ontario, the United 
States and all 
W estern provinces 
will clash and the 
'Spiel is bound to 
be a bigger success 
than ever. We wel- 
our many friends 
who come in for 
other recreation. 
May we have visits 
from you all and renew our old 
friendships. 

The Prize List and Events 

There are some thirteen events, 
four of these being the open 
events which any rink is entitled 
to enter if they are affiliated with 
a curling club that is recognized 
by the Manitoba Curling Associa- 
tion. The prize list 'this year is 
better than ever and amounts to 
$7,000. Below is a line-up of the 
events and the prizes accompany- 
ing each one, the open events 
heading the list. 

The Dingwall Trophy. — 1st 
prize, four silver tea and coffee 



sets in mahogany 'trays ; 2nd, four 
mahogany clocks ; 3rd, four silver 
fruit dishes ; 4th, four silver Pyrex 
casserole dishes. 

Purity Flour Challenge Trophy. 
— 1st prize, four cabinets of sil- 
ver ; 2nd, four cut glass water 
sets; 3rd, four cut glass vases; 
4th, four silver fruit bowls. 

Birks Trophy. — 1st prize, four 
mahogany clocks ; 2nd, four table 
lamps ; 3rd, four silver plated 



Jerry Robinson Trophy (Single 
Rink District Competition). — 1st 
prize, four diamond set lockets ; 
2nd, four ladies' ivory toilet sets ; 
3rd, four electric percolators ; 4th, 
four silver cake plates. 

J. P. Robinson Memorial 
Trophy (City vs. All-Comers). — 
1st prize, four electric lamps ; 2hd, 
four silver teapots; 3rd, four sil- 
ver butter dishes ; 4th, four cut 
glass sugars and cream. 




Aggregate Prize). — 1st prize, 
four gold medals. 

Bright Lights 

The city will put its best foot 
forward in trying to give its visi- 
'tors a hearty welcome. There is 
to be an Automotive Equipment 
Show held in the Industrial Bur- 
eau during the second week of the 
bonspiel ; spendid shows are billed 
for the various theatres and mov- 
ing picture houses, 
and shopping facil- 
ities will be of the 
best. There will be 
many exciting 
hockey matches in 
progress at this 
time as the various 
teams will be work- 
ing hard for the 
privilege of defend- 
ing the famous 
Allen Cup. We 
feel sure that this 
is going 'to be the 
most successful 
bonspiel held yet 
and once again we 
welcome you and 
want to make cer- 
tain that you won't 
overlook us when 
you hit the town. 
Winnipeg Bonspiel 
is a great tonic for 
pessimism, a thing 
too many of us are 
prone to at present. 
Let's all go. 



baskets ; 4'th, four sets of Sheffield 
carvers. 

Walker Theatre Trophy. — 1st 
prize, four gold watches ; 2nd, 
four cases cutlery ; 3rd, four cut 
glass bowls ; 4th four bake dishes. 

Sir John C. Eaton Trophy (Vis- 
itor's Competition). — 1st prize, 
four 17 jewel gold filled watches ; 
2nd, four 3-piece silver plated tea 
sets ; 3rd, four silver plated com- 
ports ; 4th, four half dozen each 
dinner and dessert knives in case. 

Hudson's Bay Company 
Trophy (International Competi- 
tion). — 1st prize, four gentlemen's 
gold filled watches ; 2nd, four gold 
filled watches. 



Dominion Match Co. Trophy 
(Double Rink District Competi- 
tion). — 1st prize, eight leather 
club bags ; 2nd, eight cut glass 
salad dishes. 

Lieutenant-Governor's Cup 
(Consolation Match). — 1st prize, 
four gold medals; 2nd, four eight- 
day clocks ; 3rd, four silver Pyrex 
plates ; 4th, four cut glass nappies. 

White Competition (Veterans). 
— 1st prize, four travelling bags; 
2nd, four berry dishes. 

Fry's Cocoa Cup (Ladies Com- 
petition). — 1st prize, four pieces 
of cut glass ; 2nd, four pieces cut 
glass. 

Governor-General's Cup (Grand 



Tractor Mortality 



It is evident from records that 
the tractor mortality is high in 
America, that is from the stand- 
point of types designed which 
have not been a success upoti the 
market. It is stated that in the 
United States 256 tractor com- 
panies have been formed since 
1-916. No one knows how many 
more companies were floated 
which never developed beyoad 
the stock selling stage. Out of 
the 256 companies 96 are no 
longer in existence, a mortality 
rate of 37.5 per cent. 



G 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Here is good procf that no 
implement dealer can afford to 
offer his customer a iiiac.hine that 
is not backed by a reliable organi- 
sation and one that is financially 
strong. This is especially true in 
Western Canada where we liri\e 
stringent laws respecting war- 
ranties and the supply oi repair 
parts. In the past tractors have 
been sold — a very few at most — 
by concerns who had meagre 
financial responsibili'tv and Avho 
ultimately pulled out of the terri- 
tory or died through lack of 
financial nourishment. T h e y 
however, left a load of trouble 
for the dealers who happened to 
handle their machines. . 

In connection with what ex- 
perience has shown in the tractor 
industry, it might be well to 
compare the automobile industry 
with the tractor. Although the 
market for automobiles is un- 
doubtedly far greater than that 
for tractors, hundreds of com- 
panies are organized, while the 
number surviving is few. Prob- 
ably the average individual could 
name a dozen makes of cars.' Of 
course, there are many more on 
the market, some important, 
others less well known. 

Now we can say that there 
will be a survival of the fit'test 
and only those will survive in the 
end that are backed by reliable 
companies of good financial stand- 
ing. 

There will be many makes of 
tractors developed and there will 
be changes on tractors which are 
already on the market, but so far 
as new companies are concerned, 
-we believe that the time has 
passed when there will be many 
new concerns who will enter, the 
tractor market. 



Oliver Chilled Plow Works 
Lower Prices 



The Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, South Bend, Ind., an- 
nounces price reductions on horse- 
drawn implements ranging from 
8 to 20 per cent. The company 
is represented in Canada, by the 
Canadian Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, at Regina and Toronto. 
The prices given below place 
Oliver prices back approximately 
to the basis prior to the advance 
made in April, 1920. 

Approximate percentages of re- 
duction on the goods manufac- 
tured or sold by this organization 
follow : 

Chilled walking plows and 
shares, 20 per cent. 

Steel walking plows, riding 
plows and listers, 12 per cent. . 

Cultivators and spike-tooth har- 
rows, 9 per cent. 

Disk harrows, spreaders, plan- 
ters and drills, 10 per cent. 



The definite price schedules 
may vary slightly from these 
figures in some cases. No reduc- 
tion on Oliver repairs is announ- 
ced at this time. 

No change is said to be con- 
templated at this time on tractor- 
drawn tools. A reduction on 
these was put into effect about 
NoA'ember 1, last. 



E. A. White Heads Agricultural 
Engineers 



The election of E. A. White as , 
president of the American Society 
of Agricultural Engineers carries 
incidental interest to the older 
friends of the society because it 
has been pointed out that every 
charter member of the society 
now living has come to its presi- 
dency. Mr. AVhite, or Dr. White 
as he is known among those who 
hold worth while the honors 
arising from scholarship and re- 
search, holds a doctor's degree in 
agricultural engineering from Cor- 
nell University. This is believed 
to be the first and only degree of 
its kind ever granted in America, 
and bears' testimony to a high 
order of engineering skill and 
research ability. 

Air. AVhite's research work at 
Cornell was devoted largely to 
the moldboard plow and resulted 
in the establishment of a working- 
theory and I mathematical Vvay 
of expressing in three algebraic 
terms the shape of any successful 
moldboard plow. It may be said 
that Mr. White probably has done 
more than any other , man in 
America to bring plow design 
from an art to a science. It was in 
connection with his plow studies 
which he kept up after leaving 
Cornell that he inven,t'ed the mul- 
tiple hitch, admittedly the most 
efficient way of hitching teams of 
four or more horses in plowing. 
• It may be remarked that Mr. 
AVhite Avas born and raised on a 
farm in northern Illinois, that he 
is a graduate of the College of 
Agriculture, University of Illinois, 
and that following his post-grad- 
uate work at Cornell, was in 
charge of agricultural engineer- 
ing- work at the Univejrsity of 
Illinois for seven years. In this 
capacity he started and carried on 
up to the time he left the univer- 
sity, one of the mosit comprehen- 
sive studies ever attempted of the 
cost of tractor operation together 
with other important facits such 
as per cent, of time lost in trouble, 
amount of use annually, etc. 
Under his administration sub- 
stantial progess was made by the 
university in other branches of 
agricultural engineering, notably 
farm structures and drainage. 
Mr. White left the university 



to become research engineer for 
the Peoria plant of the Holt 
^Manufacturing Company. He has 
for a number of years been an ex- 
tensive and authoritative writer 
on farm machinery and power- 
farming equipmenit and methods, 
and is now technical editor of 
"Farm Implement News." 

W. G. Kaiser, of the Portland 
Cement Association, Chicago, 
Illinois, is first vice-president and 
E. R. Jones, of the University of 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 
second vice-president. Frank P, 
Hanson, Station A, Ames,Iowa, 
who has been assistant-secretary 
for a number of mon,ths, will be_ 
secretary-treasurer. The Exe- 
cutive Council for 1921 consists 
of I. W. Dickerson, Charles City, 
Iowa, agricultural editor for a 
number of farm publications ; F. . 
N. G. Kranich, Hyatt Roller 
Bearing Company, Chicago, Illi- 
nois ; Raymond Olney, The Power 
Farming Press, St. Joseph, Michi- 
gan ; F. A. Wirt, Emerson-Brant- 
ingham Company, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania; J. B. Davidson, 
Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 
The retiring members of the 
Council, A. J. R. Curtin, Portland' 
Cement Association, 'Chicago, 
Illinois, and Daniel Scoates, 
Texas A. & M. College, College 
Station, Texas, are succeeded by 
Messrs. Kranicli and Davidson, 
who come into the Council from 
the presidency and -tjhe secretary- 
treasurership, respectively. 



Western Canada Automotive 
Equipment Show 



The second Aveek of the Annual 
W'innipeg Bonspeil will usher in 
the first show in the) Avest, in 
Avhich motor car accessories and 
equipment will be the exclusive 
feature. The display commences 
Monday, 14th, and continues till 
Saturday night, the 19th, the floor 
space of the Industrial Bureau 
being completely utilized by ex- 
hibitors. Winnipeg is very lucky 
in haAang this show just at this 
time Avhen so many visitors- will 
be in town who will* (take a very 
keen interest in the various 
booths, and there is no question 
about it being a huge success. 

Below is a list of some of the 
exhibitors : 

D. Ackland & Son. 

Acme Magneto & Electrical 
Co., Ltd. 

J. H. Ashdown HardAvare Co., 
Ltd. 

S. F. Bowser & Co., Ltd. 
Burgess Ba,tteries, Ltd. 
Burd Ring Sales Co. of Canada. 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 
Ltd. 

Canadian Oil Companies, Ltd. 



Canadian General Electric Co., 
Ltd. 

Canadian National Carbon Co 
^ Canada Dry Cells, Ltd . 

Canadian Raybestos Co., Ltd. 

Champion Spark Plug Co. of 
Canada, Ltd. 

Great West Saddlery Co., Ltd. 

Globelite Battery Co., Ltd. 

Hercules Bumper Ltd. 

Imperial Oil, Ltd. 

J. B. LaAvrence & Co. 

Marshall Wells Co., Ltd. 

Miller-Morse Co., Ltd. 

Moncrieff & Endress, Ltd. 

Motor Products, Ltd. 

Northern Electric Co., Ltd. 

North Star Oil & Refining Co., 
Ltd. 

North Star Anti-Freeze Co. 

Oak Tire & Rubber Co., Ltd. 

Peters & Herron Co. 

The Porcupine Sales Corpor- 
ation Ltd. 

Prest-O-Lite Co. of Canada, 
Ltd. 

Pyrene Mfg. Co. of Canada. 
Richards-Wilcox Canadian Co., 
Ltd. 

Sales, Ltd. 

Standard Machine Works. 
Tuthill Spring Co. 
Weaver Mfg. Co. 
Wood, Vallance, Ltd. 



F. N. McDonald Now Controls 
Business 

F. N. McDonald, 156 Princess 
St., Winnipeg, announces that he 
has taken over the business for- 
merly carried on under the name 
of McDonald & McKinnon, 
Winnipeg. Mr. McKinnon has 
now severed his connection with 
the firm, which now operates 
under the title of F. N. McDonald 
& Co. The company will conitinue 
as Manitoba distributors for the 
Canadian Briscoe Motor Co., 
Brockville, Ont. They are also 
sales agents for the Sawyer- 
Massey Company, of Hamiliton, 
Ont., jobbing tractors, threshers 
and road-making machinery for 
the latter firm. 

In addition, F. N. McDonald & 
Co. Avill distribute McLaughlin 
and Canada Carriage buggies and 
cutters, NeAV Wonder" Avild oat 
separators, Wallis tractors and 
Edwards conventible V/z h. p. to 
6 h. p. kerosene engines. The lat- 
ter is manufactured by the Ed- 
Avards Motor Company of Spring- 
field, Ohio, with a variable power 
from V/i to 6 h. p. It is two- 
cylinder, horizontal, twin, four- 
cycle design, 3-inch bore by 5- 
inch stroke. An independent 
direct feed intake to each cylinder 
permits running one or .both 
cylinders. This engine uses kero- 
sene or gasoline, the fly-wheel 
being set in the middle of* crank- 
shaft, Avith the cranks 180 degrees 
apart. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 




What Is the Tractor s 
Record of Economy? 

Before you make your tractor contract, get its record cf economy. 

Don't be Batisfied with merely statements of what the tractor will or 

may do under certain conditions, but got a jecord of what it has done 

under all conditions over as long a period of time as possible. 

• 

The story of any one of thousands of old OilPuU tractors, scattered 
throughout the world, would prove the unequaled economy of the 
CilPu'.l. Take the one owned by Radtke Bros., Spiritwood, North 
Dakota, which was bought nine years ago. Its owners have always 
Civen it hard service the year 'round — plowing and breaking sod, 
threshing, operating feed mill, etc. 

For seven years it performed faultlessly without the need of a single 
important repair! It is now nine years old and not half "worked out." 
Many twelve-year-old OilPuUs, including the first one built, are still 
on the job! 

The OilPull's remarkable economy in fuel is well and widely estab- 
lished. For the last nine years the OilPull has held the world's tractor 
fuel economy record! And — consider this point- — the OilPull is tho 
only tractor backed by a written guarantee to burn successfully all 
grades of kerosei.e, under all conditions up to its fullffated brake horse- 
power! The OiiPuU is the tractor of proved economy^ When you 
sell an OilPull you Anow you are selling the tractor that is cheapest 
in cost per year of service. 

Have us tell you about other OilPull features that are as outstanding 
as its economy — about its dependability, long life, etc. 

And have us tell you about the great service organization back of 
every Advance-Rumely dealer. 

ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER COMPANY, Inc. 
LaPorte, Indiana 



Calgary, Alfa. 
Saskatoon, Sask. 



48 Abell Street, Toronto, Ont. 



Regina, Sask. 
Winnipeg, IVXan. 




TVine -Year- Old OilPull 
Owned by Radtke Btoi, 
Spiritwood, N, D- 



Guaranteed to bum kerosene 
unif.er conditions up to its 
fu!! rated brake horsepower. 
Holds tbe present world 
tractor fuel economy record. 



ADVANCE-RUMELY 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



New Milking Machine Company 
Established 



Announcement is received of 
the incorporation of the Macart- 
ney-Somes Milking Machine Co., 
of Bloomfield, NJ., with the 
following officers : L. N. Somes, 
president and general manager ; 
A. C. Macartney, vice-president, 
in charge of all development and 
production work; J. J. Clark, 
treasurer, and A. P. Jennings, 
secretary. All of these officers 
are men of recognized position in 
the business. 

Mr. Somes was formerly associ- 
ated with the Sharpies Separator 
Co. in the various capacities of 
expert, blockman and territorial 
manager. For the last eight years 
he has been associated with the 
Empire Cream Separator Com- 



pany, of Bloomfield, New Jersey. 
He held the important position 
of general sales manager in 
charge of their sales activities 
over the entire United States and 
Canada. 

A. C. Macartney is recognized 
as one of the world's greatest 
milker inventors. He has devel- 
oped or helped to develop many 
of the prominent machines, for 
example : The Dominion, the 
Sharpies, tha Pine Tree, the Em- 
pire, and the Macartney Milker 
of Canada. His new milker, to 
be known as the New Macartney 
Milker, which he now has ready 
for this company, is said to eclipse* 
all his past efforts. 

Mr. Jennings, the secretary, is 
well known to the milker world. 
He was assistant advertising 
manager of the Sharpies Separa- 



Ccmhan« 



WINNIPEG Zikn^^ CALGARY 

1A#RITE US, mentioning this publication, for 
catalogues and prices of the famous 
ALL-STEEL RUTH SELF FEEDER, any of the 
six styles of Maytag Washing Machines, Oils, 
Belts, Headlights, and all other Threshers' 
Supplies. (ll'l^fc^E^J'N^iJliy^LeSg) Do Not Delay. 




The 
"Straight 
Disc," found 
ly on the 
Viking CreamSep- 
arator. No other separ- 
ator sold has such great sales possibilities as this 
one feature on the Viking. This is why dealers are 
continually giving up selling other separators, pre- 
ferring to handle only the one separator they can 
unqualifiedly endorse as the peer of them all. 

Dealers don't have to work their heads off in sell- 
ing the Viking with this unequalled "Straight Disc." 
They have only to explain its principle, and dairymen 
at once see why we can guarantee the Viking to skim 
to 3/100 of one percent, or better. This makes selling 
easy for the dealer. Send for our dealer proposition 
and latest catalog No. 165 

SWEDISH SEPARATOR COMPANY 



714 Confederation 
Winnipeg , 




tor Co. for years. For the last 
year and more he held the posi- 
tion of advertising manager of the 
Empire Cream Separator Co. He 
has also been associated with the 
tractor field and is well known to 
dealers and farmers over the 
entire U.S. and Canada. 



Empire Executive visits 
Canadian West 



H. E. MacWhinney, vice-presi- 
dent, Empire Cream Separator 
Company, Bloomfield, N.J., was 
in Winnipeg on January 18th and 
19th talking over business pros- 
pects with Mr. Robinson, of the 
Robinson-Alamo Company, West- 
ern Canadian distributors for the 
Empire people. Mr. MacWhin- 
ney left New York City on 
December 15th on a trip of in- 
spection of the various branches 
throughout the United States and 
Canada. He reports business 
prospects for the coming year 
very bright in all their lines, in- 
cluding their well known separa- 
tor, milking machine and gas 
engines. Mr. McWhinney finds 
conditions better in Canada than 
in the United States as regards 
financing. He left for New York 
and the head office. 

W. N. Robinson, of Robinson- 
Alamo Ltd. is giving particular 
at'tention to "Empire" lines dur- 
ing the coming year. The factory 
is in splendid condition to meet 
all demands and has ' some very 
ambitious plans on foot for assist- 
ing their dealers to get the big 
trade that is anticipated. 



Empire Distributors in Eastern 
Canada 



The Peoples' Manufacturing 
and Sales Co., Ltd., Ottawa, has 
been given-> exclusive rights in 
Ontario of the Empire cream sep- 
arator, milkinig machine and gas 
engine. The company is incor- 
porated with an authorized capi- 
tal of $300,000. The president of 



PUMPS 

AND 

Clothes Reels 

Made in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle pumps for 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys- 
tems. 



SUCCESSORS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(Established 1883) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS- PRICES 




North-West Pump Co. 

T. N. WILUAMSON W. J. MERKELL 
Phone 607 

19-6th Street Brandon, Man. 



the new company is W. J. Hemp- 
hill, of Ottawa, who has been 
connected with the Empire Cream 
Separator Company for 17 years. 
Stock in the new concern, it is 
reported, is being sold largely to 
implement dealers and farmers of 
Ontario. 



Dairying and Prosperity 



Records from the United States 
show that upon the dairy farms 
in that country will be found more 
power machinery — engines, trac- 
tors, trucks and automobiles than 
upon any other class or group of 
farms. Dairymen are well able to 
buy what they need in improved 
equipment. 

Statistics show* that in the 
United States nearly 60 per cent 
qf the farmers in the leading, dairy 
states own ensilage cutters, 40 
per cent own feed mills, over 38 
per cent own wood saws, nearly 
14 per cent own threshing ma- 
chines, nearly 6 per cent own 
stump pullers, nearly 5 per cent 
own balers. 

It is interesting to note that, 
while about 18 per cent of the 
dairymen are reported as owning 
tractors last year, nearly 70 per 
cent were owners of automobiles, 
12.33 per cent had motor trucks, 
nearly 25 per cent used milking 
machines and nearly 80 per cent 
owned gasoline engines. Many of 
the machines in use require large 
horsepower, and dairymen are 
proving that the tractor is in- 
valuable for this work, a fact the 
dealer sometimes overlooks. 



Separator Lowers Cost of 
Rearing Calves 



The introduction of the cream 
separator has solved the problem 
of rearing calves. If in the old 
days feeding skim-milk to calves 
brought poor results, it was not 
because of the inferiority of the 
feed, but because the system was 
wrong. Warm skim-milk right 
from a clean hand separator 
makes it possible to r.ear calves 
successfully and a great deal more 
economically than by allowing 
them to nurse on the dam. The 
hand separator has not only 
revolutionized the but'ter in- 
dustry, but has been equally im- 
portant in making it possible to 
raise the best calves. Cream sep- 
arators make not only better and 
cheaper butter but also better and 
cheaper calves. And this applies 
not only to dairy stock but also 
to beef animals. 



Your competitor also has- his 
worries. Talk things over with 
him occasionally. It'll help you 
both. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



9 




De Laval is the 
World's Standard 
Cream Separator 



Over 50,000 leading dealers 
sell De Laval Cream Sepa- 
rators and De Laval Milkers. 
More than 2,500,000 farmers 
have bought them— and the 
number is growing every day. 



There is no better time than right now to 
send in your application for the De Laval 
Cream Separator or Milker agency. There 
is separator and milker business all around 
you. You can get more of it and make 
more profit with the De Laval than with 
any other machine. 



THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, Ltd. 

MONTREAL PETERBORO WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 



Sooner or later you will sell the 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 




10 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



Ten American manufacturers of 
motor trucks have indicated their 
intention to open branch factories 
in Canada. 

The Imperial Oil Company is 
reported to have appropriated 
$2,000,000 for oil development in 
Alberta during 1921. 

The Canadian Tygard Engine 
Co. will erect on Kingston Road, 
Toronto, a new plant for the man- 
ufacture of carburetors. 

The Ruber Mfg. Co., Marion, 
Ohio, announce that the directors 
have voted to increase the capital 
from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000. 

The Hart-Parr Company an- 
nounces the appointment of C. A. 
Bishop to the position of wes'tern 
sales manager in charge of sales 
in western United States. 

We understand that Massey- 
Harris, Ltd., the well-known 
makers of agricultural machinery, 
have lately sent out a special rep- 
resentative to the Egyptian 
market. 

The A. C. Spark Plug plant, at 
Brantford, Ont., is completed, 
which, with over sixteen acres of 
land, has been purchased outright 
bv the General Motors Corpora- 
tion. : 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTEDO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for: 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Ltd.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
Co.; J. I. Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadiaa Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; Emerson-Branting- 
ham Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Stanley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.: 
Minneapolis Threshing Machine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



Imperial Oil, Limited, has de- 
clared an extra dividend of $1.50 
per share, to be paid in Victory 
bonds, as well as the regular 
quarterly dividend of 75 cents per 
share. 

The annual meeting of the 
Four Drive Tractor Co., of Big- 
Rapids, Mich., was held January 
12, and George Lynch was re- 
elected president of the concern 
for the ensuing year. 

The Grand Central Palace, New 
York, where for some time a 
special exhibit of implements has 
been maintained for export busi- 
ness, has been sold and will be 
converted into an office building. 

At a special meeting of the 
Illinois Tractor Co., held recently, 
the following officers were 
chosen : President, John B. 
Foote ; vice-president. Homer 
English ; secretary, E. Mehringer. 

The Engineering Service Co., 
Chicago, 111., has been organized 
by I. C. Gellman, formerly of the 
Rock Island Plow Company. The 
company will design agricultural, 
aiitomotive and mechanical ma- 
chinery. 

C. C. Clay, who has been sales 
manager for the Samson Tractor 
Co., Janesville, Wis., during the 
past tea months, has resigned and 
will return to his former position 
with the Chevrolet Motor Co., at 
Atlanta, Ga. 

The AV.ebster Electric Co., Ra- 
cine, Wis., has increased its capi- 
tal from $600,000 to $1,000,000.' In 
the same city, the Modine Mfg. 
Co., radiator manufacturers has 
increased its capital from $225,000 
to $450,000. 



Move, clean and grade your grain in one job- 
fiU bis: bins or cars ■without scoooing— 
save time, labor and money with the 

Liberty Grain Blower 

No buckets, chains or pearg, Onl; 
ONE moving' part. 6 H. P. runs it. 
One man can move it. Liirhtsst, 
simplest, best grain handler. Costa 
half as much as old-style elevator. 
FREE BOOK, illustrated, explains 
fully. Send name for copy— a card 
win do. 

LINK MFG. CO. Dept. ""o 
Portage la Prairie, Man. 




The Holt Mfg. Co., Stockton, 
Cal., and Peoria, 111., announces 
the election of Thomas F. Baxter 
as the new president of the cor- 
poration. Mr. Baxter succeeds 
the late Benjamin Holt who died 
December 5. 

The Ann Arbor Machine Cor- 
poration, Ann Arbor, Mich., 
which was recently sold at re- 
ceiver's sale to a syndicate headed 
by A. Shiffman of Detroit, will 
resume manufacturing immedi- 
ately upon reorganization. 

The Owensboro Ditcher and 
Grader Co., of Owensboro, Ky., 
has purchased a building adjoin- 
ing its plant which will be used 
to extend its production facilities. 
Recently the company increased 
its capital stock to $500,000. 

J. H. Desmond, who for the 
past 'three years has been district 
manager for the Hart-Parr Co., 
Charles City, la., in Canadian 
territory, with headquarters at 
Regina, has been called to the 
home office and placed in charge 
of all salesmen in the field. 

The new plant of the Machin- 
ery and Foundries, • Limited, 
Brockville, Ont., is almost ready 
for operation. General foundry 
and machine shop products will 
be turned out, and there will be 
special attention paid to the man- 
ufacture of power and hand 
pumps. 

The Macartney-Somes Milking 
Machine Co. has been incorpor- 
ated at Bloomfield, N.J., with a 
capital of $300,000 to manufacture 
milking machines. The incorpor- 
ators include A. C. Macartney, 
L. N. Somes and J. J. Clark. A 
Canadian factory is located at 
Ottawa. 

The Moline Plow Co., Moline, 
111., has transferred H. B. Dinneen 
from sales to production, placing 
him in charge of the manufacture 
of the Moline lines. Mr. Dinneen 
joined the Moline organization 
about a year ago after a long- 
service with Deere & Co. 

It was announced recently tha't 
the American Axle Company, 
capitalized at $6,000,000, has be- 



KINGSTON 

IGNITION SERVICE 



SPARK PLUGS — COILS 
MAGNETOS— SWITCHES 

KOKOMO ELECTRIC CO. 

INDIANA 



KOKOMO 



U. S. A. 



come heavily interested in the 
Beaver Motor Truck Corporation, 
of Hamilton, Ontario, and in fut- 
ure would supervise the operation 
of the Hamilton factory. 

The Stover Mfg. & Engine' Co., 
Freeport, 111., has announced a 
reductio'n on its line, embracing 
gasoline engines, wind mills, en- 
silage cutters, feed. grinders, saw 
frames and alfalfa comminuters. 
The reduction is approximately 
10 per cent. 

Modern Implements, Limited, 
is the name of a new oganization 
with head office at Walkerville, 
Ontario, to manufacture and deal 
in farm implements, automobiles, 
trucks, etc. The provisional direc- 
tors are Howard Earl Blood, 
Charles Donald Doraven, William 
Joseph Davidson and others. 

Sales representatives of the 
Hart-Parr Co. from all over the 
United States and Canada held a 
three-day convention lately at the 
factory in Charles City, la. Every 
man there registered real enthus- 
iasm over the sales that have been 
accomplished and those that are 
platmed for the immediate future. 

The Triple Action Spring Co., 
2810 S. Michigan Avenue, Chic- 
ago, has changed its name ito the 
Temme Spring Corp., Inc., and 
increased its capital to $2,000,000. 
The business of the organization 
is now said to cover the entire 
United States and Canada, and 
rapid strides are being 'made 
along the line of establishing ex- 
port business. 

Fulton Motors, Limited, Wel- 
land, Ont., have closed their 
option for the purchase of the 
land, building and plant of the 
Canadian Automatic Transporta- 
tion Company, on Ontario Road. 
The building is a model piece of 
factory construction. The land 
area is acres and further 

buildings will be erected upon it. 

SKF Industries, Inc., New 
York City, will exhibit at the 
Sixth National Tractor Show, 
which will be held in Columbus, 
Ohio, February 7 to 12, 1921. 
The company plans to show a 
complete line of its self-aligning 
single row ball bearings and deep 
groove double row ball bearings, 
in addition to models which will 
bring out the feature of self- 
alignment. 

A large commercial transaction 
Avas consummated when the 
assets and business of the Win- 
nipeg Oil Company, Limited, 
were purchased by the British 
American Oil Company, Limited, 
of Toronto. The . head office of 
the former company is in Winni- 
peg, and over one hundred 
branches and distributing stations 
are located throughout the prairie 
provinces. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



11 




Make sure of big Spring Business 

Get in the Cletrac Line-up 



EAST ON A TRACK 
THE CLETRAC WAY 



Cletrac sales will increase enormously in 1921. Production has 
caught up and there will be plenty of Cletracs for Spring business. 
Make sure of your supply — get in your orders at once. 

Our biggest advertising campaign is behind you. Every Canadian 
farmer will have the Cletrac message hammered home to him time 
after time right through the year. 

Cletrac is a ready seller. No tractor can compare with it for 
reducing production costs and increasing profits on the farm. It's 
easily manoeuvred and always dependable. 

Big profits will be yours this year if you get in the Cletrac line-up. 
Write for our generous dealer terms and go right after prospects now. 

The Cleveland Tractor Company 

Of Canada, Limited 
HOME OFFICE - - 21 Ottawa Street, Montreal 

Western Sales Office - 261 Fort Street, Winnipeg 



Specifications — 

Horsepower: 12 at draw-bar, 20 

at belt pulley. 
Length: 96 inches. 
Width: 50 inches. 
Height: 52 inches. 
Weight: 3,455 pounds. 
Turning circle: 12 feet. 
Traction surface: about 800 

square inches. 
Centre to centre of tracks: 38 

inches. 

Belt-pulley: diameter 8 inches, 
face 6 inches. 



There's a big bunch near you 

A conservative estimate places the 
number of immediate tractor 
prospects in Canada at 350,000. 
There's a large number right in 
your own district. Every mother's 
son of them would rather buy 
Cletrac than any other tractor. 
They're just waiting to be sold. 
It's up to you. 



Cletrac 

TANK-TYPE 
TPACTOR^ 



12 



Canadian Farm Implemenfe 



February, 1921 



Future Aspects^ in the Trade 



At the present time dealers 
confront a problem. On the one 
hand is the statement of the man- 
ufacturer that the advance in 
prices was imperative because of 
production and sales costs, higher 
freight rates, etc. Speaking to an 
implement dealers' convention in 
the United States, H. J. Hodge, 
secretary of the U.S. National 
Federation of Implement Dealers' 
Associations, said : 

"He (the manufacturer) cites 
you the fact that . in some lines 
the reductions which are being 
made are simply following de- 
clines in the replacement values, 
while in the implement industry 
the replacement values are higher 
instead of lower. He justifies the 
advance made in the face of the 
decline of farm products by quot- 
ing from statistics which show 



that while the advance on imple- 
ments, including the most recent 
advances, are somewhat greater 
than the advance which producers 
received on farm products, yet 
no advances of consequence were 
made for two years after the price 
of whea't had reached the $2 
matik. 

"Dealers should not lose cour- 
age and allow themselves to' think 
that business has gone to ever- 
lasting smash. In my 45 years' 
experience in selling implements, 
I have gone through too many 
complete crop failures and periods 
of depression not to be able to 
see some light 'through the clouds 
which seem to hang so heavily 
at the present time. 

"In the past we found that 
when the season for planting and 
harvesting came around, business 
materialized and we forgot our 
worries. W e prepared for the 



business conditions which con- 
fronted us, and that is practically 
what we must do right now. 

• "This means that you must 
make a practical survey of the 
entire situation. You must . use 
due caution in your purchases and 
make such financial arrangements 
as will enable you to carry on." 



Standardization in the Trade 



dardization during 1920 
following 



The standard committee of the 
American Society of Agricultural 
Engineers reports that excellent 
progress has been made in stan- 

The 

standards are now 
ready for final adoption: 

Standard belt speeds, in which 
it is proposed to include five 
speeds, viz., 1,500, 2,600, 3,000, 
3,250 and 3,500 feet per minute. 

Standard tractor and plow 
hitches, which include height of 



Increase Your Profits by Handling 

Crescent Plow Shares 

Leaders—In Forge and Furrow 



MADE IN MORE 
THAN 1,200 
PATTERNS 



Crescent Reinforced Shares 
are foremost in quality, 
accuracy of fit and grade of 
materials. Our three-ploy, soft 
centre steel and crucible steel 
are rolled exclusively for our 
requirements. Share production 
is our specialty. 




Regular Style. Bolted and Fitted Plow Share, 
Perfect in Fit. Best in Quality. 



THE FIT OF EVERY 
SHARE IS GUARANTEED 
FINEST STEELS ARE USED 



With Crescent Shares you 
have a share to suit practically 
every plow in use. This will 
be a big repair year. You can 
secure excellent business by 
supplying your customers with 
Crescent Shares. 



Big Demand— Quick Turn-over— Good Net Profits 




Cr^cent Engine Gang Shares. Fitted and Bolted. 
Unequalled for Power Outfits. 



Reverse Side of Regular Style Share. Note the Wide 
REINFORCED POINT and WELD. 



Ask D. Ackland & Son, Ltd., for prices and latest lists of Crescent Plow Shares. Size up your demand. 
Lay in a stock to suit the plows in your territory. You will find this a fast-selling line, at a nice margin of profit. 
Get your spring requirements — NOW. 






HAVANA, ILL., U.S.A. 

Sales Agents for Western Canada: 



D. ACKLAND & SON, LIMITED 



WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 



vertical hitch on tractor and 
lateral adjustments for plows of 
two, three and four bottoms. 

Farm wagon standards, includ- 
ing the standard automobile track 
of 56 inches and tire widths for 
wagons of various capacity rat- 
ings. 

The following standards are in 
the process of development : 

A standard code for testing and 
rating the belt and drawbar power 
of tractors. 

A standard manger form for 
dairy barns. 

Standard ratings for litter car- 
rier capacities and dimensions. 

Standard ratings for capacities 
and power requirements of en- 
silasre cutters. 



U.S. Institutes "Repair" Weeks 



Inspection and Repair Weeks 
in the United States this year are 
a national undertaking, in the im- 
plement industry. The National 
Federation of Implement and 
Vehicle Dealers' Associations and 
other organizations are behind 
the project for 1921 in all parts of 
the countr3^ Repair weeks in the 
past have proved thei^r great 
value to the farmer and have 
helped the implement trade to 
more promptly handle the spring 
rush for repairs and parts re- 
quired by the farmers. 

To meet the seasonal require- 
ments, repair week will be ob- 
- served at different times in differ- 
ent sections of the country, and 
to this end the United States has 
been divided into three zones. 
The first zone, which includes the 
states of. Texas, Arkansas, Louis- 
iana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Ala- 
bama, Georgia and Florida, rnade 
the drive during the week of 
January 31 to February 5. 

The second zone repair week 
will take place the. week of Feb- 
ruary 28 to March 5, while the 
drive in the northern or third 
zone is scheduled for the days 
April 4 to 9. 



Advice as to Repairs 



If the farmer is advised by his 
dealer to make an .early inspec- 
tion of his machines with a view 
to learning sufficiently far in ad- 
vance what repairs he is likely 
to require, the dealer will be in a 
position to order his repairs upon 
a basis other than guesswork. 
The result will naturally follow 
that when the farmer is in need 
of his repairs he will be able to 
procure them from his dealer. 



Remember 'that service costs 
money. It pays to waste the time 
giving instructions when you sell 
the machine — not later. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



13 



Sawyer-Massey 
Company 

The Sawyer-Massey Company's line of Tractors, Threshers and Road- 
Making Machinery needs no introduction to Western Dealers. For over 
80 years Sawyer-Massey goods have been the standard of quality 
throughout the Dominion. Every dealer is looking for the best. Now is 
the time to investigate the Sawyer-Massey line — the most up-to-date 
line of machinery manufactured in Canada to-day. The most aggressive 
dealers in Western Canada should handle the Sawyer-Massey line. 




The Sawyer-Massey Company announced last month that they now 
control the sale in Canada of 

WALLIS TRACTORS 

and J. I. Case Plow Works Company's Power Tillage Implements. We 
are now prepared to supply dealers with full information on the above 
lines. 




WRITE THE NEAREST BRANCH 

Sawyer-Massey Company 



LIMITED 



Head Office and Factories: Hamilton, Ont. 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 




Limited 

in 




BT Equipment is Profitable 

No matter where your territory may be, no matter what 
season of the year — there is some item in the line of BT 
Barn Equipment that you can handle profitably. 
BT Steel Cow Stalls and Steel Horse Stable Fittings are 
sold all Fall, Winter and Spring. BT Manure Carriers and 
Water Bowls are splendidly profitable lines in the fall and 
winter. During the summer and early fall BT Hay Carriers 
sell on every territory. 

There are no second-hand goods to bother with in selling BT Bam 
Equipment. There are no bad debts. There is no "service" expense. 
But there is a good margin of profit for the BT Dealer, a well advertised 
and thoroughly reliable line and plenty of help in selling. 




An Enterprising Dealer 

As an instance of what can be 
done on an ordinary, every-day 
territory take the case of Mr. 
C. H Bernath, of Harriston, Ont. 
Mr. Bernath sold, in one year, 107 
BT Steel Stalls and Stanchions; 
six Manure Carrier outfits; 110 
BT Water Bowls, with pipe and 
fittings, and six Hay Carrier 
outfits. 

When asked for the reason of his 
success Mr. Bernath repUed: "I 
attribute my success to an inti- 
mate and accurate knowledge of 
the goods, combined with a con- 
sistent constant and thorough 
canvass of the territory." 

Sell Barn Equipment Now 

Mr. Bernath's record could easily be equalled by you — and 
you would get the profits that result. 

If you have the BT Agency— push this line now. It is a 

splendid way of making profit? out of "dull months." 

If you have not the BT Agency, write us. We still have 

openings for good agents on some territories. 

There is no better time than the winter to sell Bam Equipment. The 

fanner is planning that new bam or other improvements and is ready 

to consider your canvass and place the order. 

BEATTYffBROS., Limited 

WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 

FERGUS, ONT. LONDON, ONT. MONTREAL 

ST. JOHN, N.B. LONDON, ENGLAND. 



Mr. C. H. Bernath, of Harriston, 
who has made splendid success 
with BT Equipment, by knowledge 
of the goods, backed up by careful 
canvassing 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Changes in International 
Branch Management 



L. P. Thayer, formerly branch 
manager at Hamilton, Ont., has 
been transferred to the head 
office at Chicago. 

M. J. Loughlin, formerly branch 
manager at Ottawa, Ontario, has 
been transferred in a similar 
capacity to Hamilton, Ont. 

A. W. Wallace, formerly branch 
manager at Calgary, Alta., has 
been transferred in a similar 
capacity to Ottawa, Ont. 

F. E. Spooner, formerly branch 
manager at Lethbridge, Alta., has 
been transferred in a similar 
capacity to Calgary, Alta. 

R. W. Greenway, formerly 
assistant manager at Estevan, 
Sask., has been appointed branch 
manager at Lethbridge, Alta. 



Quebec, 43,450; Alberta, 37,515; 
Manitoba, 36,455; British Colum- 
bia, 28,136; Nova Scotia, 12,456; 
New Brunswick, 11,101; Prince 
Edward Island, 1,426; total, 402,- 
929. In 1907, the registrations 
totalled 2,130. 

Of the to'tal last year, those 
provinces which separate motor 
trucks in the registrations indi- 
cate that at least 23,574 of these 
are trucks. It is stated that strik- 
ing a fair average of motor trucks 
to passenger cars there would be 
approximately 28,674 trucks in 
Canada. 



Reduction in Operating Cost 



Cars in Canada 



During 1920, the number of 
automobiles registered in Canada 
totalled 402,929. These cars were 
distributed among the various 
provinces as follows: Ontario, 
172,065; Saskatchewan, 60,325; 



The farmer claims that the 1920 
crop had the highest production 
cost of any crop on record — infer- 
ring 'that labor and implement 
cost lead to this. Even so, all 
will agree that to reduce the 
operating expense of the farm the 
necessary factor is up-to-date 
farm equipment. Such equip- 
ment should be well housed and 
kept in first class condition. If 
properly tended and repaired, the 
cost per acre per machine per 



Guarantee Your Customers Clean Seed 
by Selling Them 

"EASTLAKE" 
Grain Picklers 



Made of Heavy 
Galvanized Iron. 
Strongly reinforced. 
A strong, well-made 
Smut Destroyer, at 
a price that meets 
any competition. 



Crated for shipment with legs 
detached. Light in weight. Can 
be shipped by Express at small 
cost 




Note the position of 
strong, galvanized 
mesh. Grain can be 
dumped rapidly 
without wasting any 
solution. Saves its 
cost in a single sea- 
son. 



Smut causes a loss of 
thousands of dollars 
annually. "E a s t la k e" 
treated seed means 
better yields and bigger 
profits. 



Order a Stock- A^OW 

Immerses and Treats EVERY KERNEL 

The Pickler season is here. Your business depends upon the success of your cus- 
tomers The use of thoroughly clean, treated seed gram is essential. With the 
"Eastlake" Grain Pickler, the farmer can immerse his seed for a few seconds or 
several minutes as desired. Using the "Eastlake" he assures the complete eradica- 
tion of smut balls, and prevents possible loss. A low-set, strong and efficient pickler 
with ample capacity for any farm. Display one on your floor right away. Profitable 
business will follow. . , ,. p i • j 

Concentrate on "Eastlake" Products this year. A complete hne of Galvanized 
Shingles Siding, Eave-Trough, Well Curbing, Culverts, Tanks, Garages, Portable 
Granaries, etc. Ask for illustrated literature and agency proposition. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

Manufacturers 

797 Notre Dame Ave. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



vear will be found so low that 
no complaint need be made. If 
production cost is high, then it is 
no time for the farmer to make 
it higher by drastic retrench- 
ment in the purchase of farm 
equipment. Dealers should pre- 
sent this thought to the farmer on 
every occasion, as it is a sound 
. and logical business proposition. 



The offi'cers of the section are 
as follows: President, H. J. 
Holman, of Victoria; first vice- 
president, Neil McFarlane, of 
Weeks Motors, Nanaimo ; hon. 
secretary, G. W. Lillie, of Auto- 
motive Equipment, Ltd., Victoria. 



Wire Fence Concern Pay Bonus 
to Employees 



Tractors Wanted in Italy 



Tractor plowing tests were held 
recently near Rome, Italy. The 
tests show that light, low- 
powered tractors are not suitable 
for use in Italy as the soil is sun- 
baked in summer. Conditions 
require a tractor weighing about 
three tons, and developing from 
12 to 14 h.p. at 'the dirawbar, 
which should ordinarily be equip- 
ped with three 14-inch bottom 
plows. The Italian Government, 
who have now disposed' of most 
of the 6,500 tractors bought dur- 
ing the war to individual farmers, 
have set up shops for the repair 
of tractors. 



A system of bonuses for em- 
ployees is in force with the Ban- 
well, Hoxie Wire Fence Com- 
pany, Limited, at Hamilton, On- 
tario, and is found to work out 
very well. On several occasions 
bonuses have been paid, graded 
in amounts according to the 
length of service and position of 
the recipients. 



Sales to Branch Houses 



Coast Dealers Form Automotive 
Body 



The B.C. branch of the Retail 
Merchants' Association reports 
that 95 per cent of the automo- 
bile dealers in Vancouver Island 
have joined the association. A 
special section of this body has 
been formed with the name of 
the Provincial Automotive Re'tail 
Dealers' Section of the R.M.A. 



The Department of Customs 
and Inland Revenue rules that 
where a wholesaler buys goods 
from a manufacturer for re-sale, 
he must quote the number of his 
sales tax license and also certify 
that the goods are for re-sale. 

In cases, however, where a 
manufacturer has the wholesale 
or selling branch of his business 
entirely separate, and charges a 
sales tax between the factory and 
the wholesale' or selling branch, 
he shall be required to ta:ke out 
tAvo sales 'tax licenses — one for all 
of his factories, and one to cover 
the wholesale or selling divisions. 



Those who pay cash seldom 
owe even an apology. 




The Gray Tractor Owner 
Starts Early — 

BECAUSE THE WIDE DRIVE DRUM 

1 — Goes through soft spots in the field. 

2 — Has sufficient traction for all soil conditions. 

3 — Works on plowed land without leaving runs 
or wlieel marks in the field. 

i — Will prepare your fields without injury to 

seed bed. It does not pack the land. 
5 — Rolls the land ahead of the plow. 
ALL WORKING PARTS ENCLOSED AND 
RUNNING IN OIL BATH 
Quality is built into it. 
You get service out of it. 
Some valuable territory still open. Write for our 
dealers' proposition. 

Gray Tractor Co. of Canada, Limited 

Office and Show Rooms: Lombard St., Opposite 

Grain Exchange, Winnipeg. 
NORTON & LIEF CO. LTD. C WARING & CO. 

Calgary, Alta. Moose Jaw, Sask. 

THE TRACTOR CO., LTD., Saskatoon, Sask. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



15 



An Invitation To Dealers 

We extend Implement Dealers a cordial invitation to visit our ofB.ee and 
show rooms at 156 Princess Street during Winnipeg Bonspiel, February 
8-19. Our line will interest you. Come right in. 



Let us Show You the 
Briscoe 1921 Models 




Our Complete Line Includes : 
Mclaughlin and canada carriage buggies and cutters, 
sawyer-massey threshers, 
wallis tractors, 
j. i. case light tractor plows, 
fox automatic grain picklers 

edwards convertible i/2 to 6 h.p. kerosene engines, 
"new wonder" wild oat separators, 
automobile trailers. 

Full Information and Agency 
Proposition on Request :: 

F. N. McDonald & co. 

(Successors to McDonald & McKinnon) 

156 PRINCESS ST. - WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Notice to Dealers 



WESTERN IMPLEMENTS LIMITED, beg to advise the 
trade that they have purchased the business of the Metal 
Specialty Company Limited, and are now manufacturing: 

Farmers* Special Fanning Mills 
Rotary Automatic Picklers 
Beaver Automatic Picklers 
Corrugated Steel Stock Tanks 
Fordson Fenders 

Beaver Brand Indented Cylinders and 
Rotary Screens for Cleaning and 
Grading Seed Grains 



It will be a money-maker to you to handle 
these lines, together with the 

Plow Shares, Wood Goods, Binder and Mower Repairs, etc. 

sold by us in the past. We are also 
distributors for Saskatchewan of the 

Christiansen Mulcher Packers and Plow Harrows 



Write for 



few Price List. We Ship Promptly. 

Western Implements Limited 



6th AVE. & SCARTH ST. 



REGINA, SASK. 



THE TRACTOR YOU CAN SELL 



@ @ @ 



ALLWORK 



Drawbar, 14 H.P. 
Brake, 28 H.P. 
Four-Cylinder Motor, 
5x6 Inches 

@ @ @ 




@ © © 



ALWAYS 

White Allwork 
Kerosene Tractor 



© © © 



PROGRESSIVE DEALERS VALUE THE WHITE LINE 

[ It Has Established Reputation and Unequalled Quality 
t^^r*rvn^^ ^* Makes Satisfied Customers for Them 
X^C^CCIUot^ It Brings in Bigger Profits 

I It Sells 

It Will Pay You to Get Our Proposition. Write NOW 

THE GEORGE WHITE & SONS COMPANY, LTD., ''s^l 



16 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Dealers in Alberta form 
Association 



Agents of, the Massey-Harris 
Company in Southern Alberta 
met in Calgary during December 
and formed an association which 
was named the "Massey-Harris 
Dealers' Association of Alberta." 
J. I. Welsh, Olds, was elected 
president, and G. A. Wriggles- 



worth, of Didsbury, secretary. 
Among those present were 
Messrs. Tudhope, Gleichen ; Tol- 
ton, Taber ; Shipley, Cardston ; 
La Rose, Youngstown ; Ramsey, 
Red Deer; Allison, Pincher Creek, 
and Gilders, Oyen. 

On the invitation of the assoc- 
iation, Mr. Trickey, manager of 
the Calgary branch, Massey- 
Harris Co., attended the meeting. 



discussing with the dealers 
clauses in a statement of com- 
plaint which they placed before 
him. Various recommendations 
in connection with sales were 
made by the agents, in 'this peti- 
tion, which asked for alterations 
in sales allowances and commis- 
sions as afifecting future business. 



Muffler Equipment on the 
Tractor 




Agents will find this machine a 
great seller. Write for 
terms to agents. 



Concrete for Small Jobs 

such as foundations, culverts, bam walls and cellars 
can now be mixed at one-quarter the cost, and 20 
per cent of the cement can be saved. 

Thousands of farmers now own a CONCRETE 
MIXER, a real necessity on every farm where buUd- 
inga are to be erected or repaired. 

The London Gem Concrete Mixer 

is our latest Engineering Triumph. It solves the 
problem of Mixing Concrete on small jobs. It can 
be operated by one man. Can be run by hand or 
connected to a Gasoline Engine or any kind of power. 

It Is well built, has practically no parts to wear out, 
and will save the price of itself in ten days' use. 



London Concrete Machinery Co. Limited, London, Canada 

Dept. K WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF CONCRETE MACHINERY 



Many tractors are not equipped 
with engine mufflers. Designers 
seem to forget that engine noise 
is often responsible for the failure 
of the operator to detect minor 
irregularities in operation, which, 
if neglected, may le^d to serious 
break-downs. 

Over the roar of a tractor 
engine, running wide open, as is 
usual practice, not even a prac- 
ticed mechanic can distinguish 



Bigger Sales- — Quick Turn-overs — Better Profits 

"STANDARD" FANNING MILLS 



Canada's Foremost 
Grain Cleaner 



@ © 

Clean, Grade and 
Separate 
ALL GRAINS 

© © 

Assures Better 
Crops for the 
Farmer — ^Better 
Business for the 
Dealer 




Four Sizes: 
24, 32, 40 
and 48 Inch 

© © 

Exceptional 
Capacity 

Strongly Built 

Smooth 
Running 



Your Territory May Still be Open. Act NOW! 



Note These Features: 

Adjustable Force Feed Works 
Automatically, without ad- 
justments; 

Interchangeable Screens. Strong, 
sagless sieves; 

Improved gangs, with distri- 
butors and wild oat separator; 

Adjustable deflector for regu- 
lating the undershot blast; 

Double-head baggers or wagon 
box elevators can be supplied 
for all sizes. 



Over each of the five wheat gang sieves we have a set of stationary 
wooden slats, which work on the sieve, at all times keeping ~ the sieves 
clean, evenly distributing the grain over the FULL surface of the sieve so 
that EVERY part of the sieve MUST be doing its share of the work and 
EVERY kernel of grain must coihe in contact mith the sieve. This is the 
reason no wheat goes over with the tailings, as is the case with most 
cleaners. These slats PUSH the wheat through the perforation, keeping 
the oats flat and carryingi them over. That is why we can guarantee twice 
the capacity of any other mill having the same sieve surface. THE 
WEATHER WILL NOT AFFECT THESE SLATS, 

"STANDARD" Mills are guaranteed to perfectly separate Wild and Tame Oats 

from Wheat- and Barley. Also clean and grade: Wheat, Oats, Barley, Flax, Rye, 

Timothy, Alfalfa and all Grass Seeds. They clean and grade more grain in an hour 
than any other fanning mill built— and do it TWICE AS WELL. 

The "STANDARD" is an all-purpose, large capacity machine which is meeting the 
requirements of the most particular farmer and seedsman. Don't fail to see it. 

DEALERS:— Write for full Particulars 



THE STANDARD FANNING MILL COMPANY LTD. 

WINNIPEG - MAN. 



the little sounds which so plainly 
tell the story of 'the engine's 
working, says the Tractor 
Builder. With a well muffled 
engine, the owner, as he becomes 
acquainted with his machine, 
learns the well ordered succession 
of sounds and is able to differ- 
entiate between them when a new 
note appears — even though he 
may not be able 'to locate the 
cause and make the adjustment 
himself — while with the engine 
roaring through an open pipe no 
other sound may be detected until 
the underlying cause has pro- 
gressed so far that a serious re- 
pair job is required. 

For belt work, even more than 
in field operation, the 'tractor 
needs an effective muffler. Mo.st 
belt work is done in or near the 
farm buildings, and a free engine 
is then an unnecessary nuisance, 
its noise jarring on the nerves of 
every member of the farm house- 
hold. 



Gregg Sales Manager for Hart- 
Parr 



The Har't-Parr Company an- 
nounce the appointment of John 
P. Gregg to the position of North- 
western sales manager in charge 
of sales in Western Canada and 
Northwestern United States. Mr. 
Gregg has been with the Hart- 
Parr Company for the past 
twelve years in various capacities 
and this appointment comes as a 
well-earned promotion. He re- 
cently returned from a seven- 
months' investigation of tractor 
trade conditions in Europe for 
the Hart-Parr Company. 

J. H. Desmond, for the last 
three years, district manager for 
the Hart-Parr Co. in its Canadian 
territory with headquarters at 
Regina, has been called into the 
factory at Charles City, la., and 
placed in charge of all salesmen 
in the field. 

During his long years of ser- 
vice in the tractor industry, Mr. 
Desmond has 'travelled in practi- 
cally every tractor territory in 
North America. His broad 
knowledge of field conditions 
makes him a valuable man for 
his new work. 



Ford Plant Re-opens 



The Winnipeg plant of the 
Ford Motor Co. re-opened the 
middle of January after two 
months shut-down. Some 25 cars 
a day are being turned out daily. 
The normal capacity of 'the plant 
is 125 cars daily. 



The oftener you visit your cus- 
tomers the closer you identify 
yourself with their farm ma- 
chinery needs. 



February, 1921 Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



sAMSDn 

A New Samson Branch 
For the West 



To guarantee prompt service for Western farmers, we 
opened at Regina, Sask., on January 1st a branch 
warehouse and distributing depot. This Regina branch is 
now ready to ship promptly SAMSON TRACTORS, 
TRUCKS, DISC HARROWS, PLOWS, and the complete 
Samson line of power farming machinery. A complete 
parts stock will be carried. 

Mr. L. E. Glover 

formerly branch manager for the Cockshutt Plow Co. , 
at Calgary, has been appointed Western Sales Man- 
ager with headt[uarters at Regina. Dealers' terri- 
tories are now being allotted. Applications should 
be addressed to the Regina branch. 



SAMSON TRACTOR CO. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

SUBSIDIARY OF GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA, LIMITED 
OSHAWA, ONTARIO 

WESTERN BRANCH - - REGINA, SASK. 



18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 




THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPROVINCIAL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 



A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DFVOTF.D TO THK TNTKWF.STS OF OFALERS IN AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES. ENGINES AND MACHINERY 



Established in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLDG. WINNIPEG, CANADA 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

$1.00 per year In Canada: Foreiprn $1.2.5 per year jingle Copies/ Ten Cents 



ADVERTISING 
RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this office not later than the 25th of the 
month preceding issue in which insertion is desired. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name. We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 



Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post Office as second class matter. 



WINNIPEG CANADA, FEBRUARY. 1921 



The Labor-Saving Value of 
Farm Implements 

We can not determine accur- 
ately the extent that modern farm 
implements have increased pro- 
duction per acre, but it is certain 
that only through their use has 
the large increase in population 
been supported and labor liber- 
ated to carry on present manufac- 
turing and commercial activities. 
^Vith the implements in use sixty 
or seventy years ago no such 
condition of development and civ- 
ilization as maintains to-day is 
thinkable. 

Notwithstanding the decreased 
population of the farm, produc- 
tion has not waned, but has kept 
pace with the increased demand, 
not only of our own poijulation, 
but that of other countries to 
whom we export. 

Prior to 1840 all grain was cut 
with a cradle and bound by hand. 
To cut, bind and shock two acres 
was a good day's work for two 
men. In 1834 the reaper was in- 
vented but did not come into 
general use for twenty years 
after. Then came the self-rake. 
Marsh harvester and self-binder. 
The modern self-binder, with one 
man and three horses can cut and 
bind as much grain in a day as 
fifteen men could do in 1840. 
Even greater efficiency is secured 
in very dry sections where the 
combined harvester is used, which 
cuts, threshes and sacks the grain 
in one operation. 

Beyond question, the invention 
of the self-binder is the most im- 
portant development in the farm 
machinery field. The use of this 
machine is largely responsible for 
the reduction of the time required 
by one man to produce, harvest 
and 'thresh a bushel of wheat, 
from approximately two hours in 
1840 to ten minutes at the present 
time. 



Problems and Personality 

There are always two extremes 
to every argument. At the pres- 
ent time, according to the man 
who speaks, we are either on the 
threshold of an era of unequalled 
prosperity, or we are on the verge 
of commercial ruin. The all 
absorbing question in the trade 
is : "How will business be this 
year?" 

The truth of the matter is that 
we always have had problems and 
always will have them. The only 
difference is our problems will 
continue to become more numer- 
ous and more serious as our 
country continues to develop and 
grow in population and business 
relations become more intricate 
and complex. The medium 
through which these problems 
will be solved is the same. It is 



through the manhood, the courage 
and the broad vision of the busi- 
ness men of the Dominion. 

If the farmer could live in our 
cities now and witness the suffer- 
ing that occurs through lack of 
employment, the actual shortage 
of food and clothing with which 
the families of some workmen are 
now contending, he would view 
his own conditions with less 
alarm. 



Implements and Production 
Cost 



The production problem of the 
farmer is a rnatter of paramount 
importance. This is the time 
when the good, active implement 
dealer can best serve his farmer 
customer. It should be the busi- 
ness of every dealer to most care- 
fully study all of the implements 
that he sells and to seriously 
analyze the condition of every 
one of his customers, with the 
purpose of determining the needs 
of those customers in improved 
machinery in order that their cost 
of production may be at the mini- 
mum. 

If the dealer will thus equip 
himself and be prepared to show 
his farmer customer the actual 
dollar-and-cent saving that the 
improved tool will accomplish, we 
see no reason why the implement 
business should not prosper more 
greatly in the future than in the 
past. .The necessity for improved 



tools was never so great ; all one 
needs is a proper understanding 
of the thing that the tool accom- 
plishes, so that the farmer may 
be shown its necessity. 

It is necessary to take up com- 
petitive sales strategy as in pre- 
war days. Good salesmanship 
and good advertising, backed up 
by good tools, are needed once 
again. 



Implement Values on the Farm 



At times the agriculturist, in 
discussing what farm machinery 
and equipment costs, would give 
one the impression that it was 
nearly the total capital on the 
modern farm. As a matter of 
fact, in 1910, only 3.1 per cent 
of. the -total capital of farms in 
the U.S. was invested in imple- 
ments. Lives'tock represented 12 
per cent investment and buildings 
15.4 per cent. The land repre- 
sented 69j^ per cent of the total 
capital invested. Granting that 
farm machinery has advanced 100 
per cent during the past ten 
years, Secretary Meredith of the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
in his 1920 report, says that the 
value of land increased 250 per 
cent between 1910 and 1920. 
Similar advances are evident in 
Canada. Therefore the percentage 
invested in agricultural imple- 
ments remains relatively 'the same 
as it was in 1910, or even less. 



Selling Advertised Goods 

It is safe to say that easy sel- 
ling is a thing of the past, nor 
can we claim that lack of supply 
is a" sufficient alibi for lack of 
business. The dealer will find 
that it costs no more to stock 
advertised goods. In the long 
run it costs less. Re-advertise 
and display the goods advertised 
to your customers through the 
farm .press and you will find 
quicker turnover. 

Business can be got by 'team 
work with the manufacturer. You 
can choose your merchandise and 
biJild consumer demand by hand- 
ling advertised lines. Stores 
which ignore the basic principle 
that underlies this policy are 
usually failures or near-failures. 
Stores which stock these lines are 
usually successful. 

Merchants who merchandise 
advertised fines are invariably the 
most successful people in town. 

Co-operate with the Traveller 

A good idea for the implement 
dealer is to ask the traveller with 
whom he docs business, who calls 
upon him: "How long can you 
spend with us?" He can then 
endeavor to have every moment 
of the visit utilized. 

If prices are to come down, ex- 
penses must be cut, and every 
dealer can help in this by helping 
every 'travelling man to do a fall 
day's work. 

We appreciate that many trav- 
ellers call on dealers where no 
previous business has resulted 
and perhaps the traveller is a new 
man in the territory. It is well 
for the dealer to remember that 
the traveller, like himself, has a 
day's work to perform, and 
courtesy is a great asset to help 
one on the way. 



The Harness Trade 

We have in Canada to-day over 
three and one-half million horses, 
the vast majority of which are 
used for work on the farms. The 
truck has displaced the horse in 
cities to a great extent, but in 
country districts the dealer can 
secure a satisfactory and steady 
demand for harness, horse 
blankets and s'table supplies. 

Harness manufacturers con- 
sider that everything points to 
a very active demand for team 
and work harness during 1921. 
The farmers of Canada during the 
last four or five years have' been 
very conservative in their pur- 
chase of harness goods on account 
of the high price of raw materials 
and the result is that the manu- 
facturers are looking for the time 
when the farmer will have to re- 
plenish his supply of harness. 



Canadian Farm Implements 19 



February, 1921 



Personal 

Steve Rudoy now owns an auto 
repair shop at Buchanan. 

A. H. Norton, of Starbuck, is 
now handling automobiles. 

W. B. Packard is a new imple- 
ment dealer at Bladworth. 

A new implement dealer at 
Kinistino is A. Davidson. 

W. Burrows has closed his 
auto business at Somerset. 

The West End Garage, Winni- 
peg, has changed o.wnership. 

Henry Mette has opened an 
implement business at Bruno. 

J. Woodman, a harness dealer 
at Youngstown, died recently. 

The Imperial Oil Co. have 
opened a branch in Brandon. 

E. M. Butts has sold out his 
automobile interests a't Kinistino. 

W. R. Harnett has opened an 
implement business at Tompkins. 

J. E. Hamilton, of Sperling, has 
discontinued his machinery shop. 

Auto supplies are now sold in 
Brandon, by Samuel H. Brown. 

The trade has a new member 
in J. R. Welks, at Churchbridge. 

Gretzinger Bros., dealers at 
Beausejour. are succeeded In- 
].. Letz. 

1. A. Monsels is owner of a 
tractor and auto repair shop at 
Afelfort. 

L. J. G. Wagner is owner of a 
new implement business at Mar- 
kinch. 

.v. A. Dickson, auto dealer at 
Irma, has .sold out to E. B. 
Mallioit. 

Flaxcombe, Sask., has a new 
implement and oil dealer in W 
H. Code. 

Partnership is registered iu the 
South Side Battery Works, at 
Moose JaAv. 

A new automobile business has 
been opened at Medicine Hat by 
C. Baker. 

R. Konrad, Jr., is in contr<jl 
uf a new farm equipment business 
at Kendal. 

Farm machinery is now being 
carried by Smith & Campbell, a"t 
Sandy Lake. 

W. H. Code is operating an 
implement and oil business, a't 
Flaxcombe. 

A change in management is 
reported in the Pioneer Garage, 
at Darmody. 

M. N. Johnson, of Provos't, has 
sold out his farm machinery lines 
in that town. 

It is stated thatr J. D. Neufeldt, 
dealer at Niverville, is retiring 
from business. 

F. W. Buth, dealer at Leader, 
is reported as opening a branch 
at Westerham. 



A. L. Clemens has started a 
hardware and implement business 
at High River. 

J. E. Butterworth & Son are 
commencing an implement busi- 
ness at Coleville. 

S. G. Jamieson, implement 
dealer at Bow Island, has moved 
to Medicine Hat. 

J. Prokopetz is stated to be dis- 
continuing his implement busi- 
ness at Hampton. 

Bennett & Lamont, garage 
owners at Moosomin, have dis- 
solved partnership. 

Thompson Bros., hardware and 
harness dealers at Tramping 
Lake, have sold out. 

The Ford & Smith Garage is a 
new automobile sales and repair 
concern at Carlyle. 

Robertson & Co. have dissolved 
partnership in their motor busi- 
ness, at Rockhaven. 

The American Auto Painting 
Co. is a new firm commencing 
business in Winnipeg. 

Q. Pettigrew is reported lu 
have discontinued his implement 
business at Lums^i^^ , 

O. Gratin, implement dealer al 
Cadogan, is said to be advertisiiv.;- 
his business for sale. 

Olson & Curran have bought 
out the auto business of Sluman 
& Jordet, at Penzan.ce. 



The automobile store of J. H. 
Maynes, Nokomis, was burned 
some three weeks ago. 

Hilliard Bros., implement deal- 
ers at Watson, are reported. !o be 
discontinuing business. 

J. G. Garbe has sold out his 
hardware and harness business at 
Churchbridge to J. Welk. 

R. Dupre, an automobile and 
tractor repair man at Stockholm, 
\ isited Winnipeg recently. 

C. S. Stewart, implement dealer 
at Sperling, spent a few days in 
Winnipeg during January. 

The automobile business of J. 
j. Gerbrandt, at Drake, was de- 
stroyed by fire recently. 

A. Davidson, ^Yeyburu, is 
handling the Overland and Gray- 
Dort agencies in that centre. 

Schram Bros, are partners in a 
hardware, implement and black- 
smithing business at Grayson. 

Mead & Bergstal, dealers al 
X'antage, have dissolved partner- 
ship in their implement business. 

J. P. Kennedy, lumber and ini- 
])lement dealer at Outlook, has 
sold out his implement business. 

B. 'Ihonipsou has boiiglit (..ait 
the implement business a't Silton, 
formerly owned by G. D. Prossci 

Nickel Bros, recently suf¥ered 
tire loss in connection with their 
autimiobie business at Waldhe'"'ii. 



The Dominion Automobile Sup- 
|jly Co., jobbers at Regina, have 
discontinued operations in that 
city. 

Wallis & Cleland have formed 
a partnership in an implement 
and automobile concern, at Corn- 
field. 

Mr. Tatelman. of Richardson 
& Tatelman, Beausejour, has sold 
out his interest in the garage 
business. 

A. R. Coulthard has bought 
out the implement business at 
Mather, formerly owned by R. A. 
Coulson. 

The Prairie City Oil Co., Win- 
nipeg, are increasing the capital 
')f the companv from $250,000 to 
S500,030. 

R. Armour has bought out the 
automobile business at Dodsland 
formerly controlled by E. E. 
.>rcDonald. 

Sauer Bros., implement men at 
Xeudorf, have reorganized. The 
firm is now controlled by Sauer 
<!<: Bismeyer. 

Ross McKinnon has been ap- 
])ointed sales manager of the 
( lievrolet Motor Co. of Canada. 
(Jshawa, Ont. 

D. A. Kippeu has sold his auto 
business at Carlyle to R. H. Ford. 
The latter will handle cars, trucks 
and 'tractors. 

j\. Cliristenson has bought out 
the auto and accessory business 
at Camrose formerlv owned hv 
L. E. Martin. 

\\'innipeg has another new 
business firm to her credit in the 
Manitoba Auto Sheet Metal and 
Radiator Co. 

E. H. Stevens is reported to 
have sold out his farm machinery 
business in that 'town to McCor- 
mick and Smith. 

E. E. Erickson and A. D. 
Campbell have bought out the 
implement business of A. A. 
Swarren, at Camrose. 

The firm of Robertson & Co.. 
Rockhaven, is succeeded by J. H. 
Coe, in 'the hardware and auto- 
mobile business. 

Jas. Groom, and also McDonald 
and Thickson, are said to have 
discontinued automobile busi- 
nesses at Carman. 

The J. H. Ashdown Hardware 
Co., Winnipeg and Regina, have 
increased their capital from $2,- 
000,000 to $3,000,000. 

J. K. Hay. Foxwarreu, dealer 
iu lumber and implements, has 
sold his lumber business to 'the 
Monarch Lumber Co. 

W. J. Gibson suffered fire loss 
in his automobile business at 
Napinka. The loss was partly 
covered by insurance. 

I\Ir. Beaton, sales manager of 
the McLaughlin Motor Car Co., 
Oshawa, will visit the Winnipeg- 
branch during bonspiel. 



Get Your Repair 
Orders In Early 



N 



OW is the time to advise your 
customers to check up their 
equipment. Tell them to list 
the parts that need replace- 
ment and let you know. Ask them 
to place orders at once — not when 
the rush of spring work starts. 
Their co-operation is necessary if 
you are to give efficient Repair 
Service. 

Drop in wheat prices holds no 
terrors for the man who can counter- 
balance them with a lessened pro- 
duction cost. 

But efficient farming cannot be 
based on use of worn-out or un- 
repaired machines. Neither will it 
result when repairs are made on 
machines not worth the repairing. 

Retrenchment on the farms should 
not mean refraining from purchasing 
of improved machinery. Rather, it 
should take the form of utilizing 
every form of modern equipment to 
assure the largest yield with the 
minimum amount of expense. 

"Repairedness" means "Preparedness'' 



20 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



T, W. Moore & Sons, owners 
of the Excelsior Garage, at Rou- 
leau, are carrying on a battery 
storage and repair service. 

A. J. McMillan has sold out his 
livery business at Shellmouth, 
but will carry on in the farm 
equipment line. 

A. Matheson, sales manager of 
D. Ackland & Son Ltd., Winni- 
peg, spent a few days in Regina, 
the la'tter part of January. 

Jas. Cannons has taken a part- 
ner into his automobile concern 
at Cypress River. The firm's 
name is now O'Neil & Cannons. 

R. B. Muir, of Roland, has dis- 
continued selling autos and im- 
plements. In the same town, W. 
M. Rennick has discontinued his 
garage. 

Some 30 -salesmen of the Win- 
nipeg division of Imperial Oil 
Limited met in convention at 



Winnipeg the week of January 
24th. 

Winton & McDonald, imple- 
ment dealers at Mossbarik, have 
dissolved partnership. J: Mc- 
Donald now has control of the 
business. 

H. P. Stoneman. assistant gen- 
eral manager of the John Morrow 
Screw and -Nut .Co.,; Ingerspll, 
Ont., visited the western provin- 
ces recently. 

R. C. Haas and R. H. Smith, 
Minneapolis,- visited Winnipeg 
recently to establish a plant for 
the manufacture . of the Myers 
grain feeder and cleaner. 

The Au'to Service Co., Regina, 
has applied for permission to 
change the name of the company 
to the McKee Motor Co. They 
will handle implements as well 
as automobiles.- 



ANNOUNCING THE 

Belcher Tractor Hitch 

A Sales Opportunity for Dealers that has never been equalled 




Does not Uncouple the Tractor from the Load 

The Belcher Tractor Hitch is AUTOMATIC, a LOAD CONTROLLER, 
SAFETY HITCH and SHOCK ABSORBER. Absolutely eliminates all danger 
of breakage of Tractor or Implement. 

Made for all Standard Tractors. The above cut is our Style A, for Titan 
10-20 h.p. tractors. 

Aggressive dealers wanted everywhere. Write us at once to secure 
territory. Reasonable in price. Will add years to the life of both tractor and 
implements. It eliminates practically all tractor troubles. We can make 
prompt delivery and furnish complete literature. ■'■"^■"^^ 
is a real money-making opportunity for you. 



WRITE TO-DAY. This 



See us During Winnipeg Bonspiel 



FRED P. BELCHER 



717 Grain 
Exchange 



WINNIPEG 



The Home Appliances Mfg. 
Co., Winnipeg, has been incor- 
porated with a capital of $250,000. 
They have purchased a plant in 
which they will manufacture elec- 
tric washing machines. 

A. A. Campbell; Toronto, has 
beea appointed manager of the 
New Massey-Harris branch, at 
Brandon. A. G. Howell is office 
manager. A full, line of Massey- 
Harris implements will be carried. 

Prof. J. W. Dorsey, of Mani- 
toba University, states that he 
has perfected a method of start- 
ing and operating automobiles at 
very low temperature, down to 
40 degrees F. The device is 
electrical. 

J. A. McGowan recently pur- 
chased the Massey-Harris prop- 
erty a't Nokomis. Besides hand- 
ling the Massey-Harris line, he 
sells tractors. Bull Dog fanning 
mills, De Laval cream separators, 
harness, pumps and sewing 
rhachines. 

Grover Weyland, vice-presi- 
dent, and R. Henderson, of the 
Racine office, J. I. Case Plow 
Works Co., along with M. Schibs- 
by and F. Goodner, of the Minne- 
apolis branch of the plow com- 
pany, were recent visitors to 
Winnipeg. 

Louis F. Jenns, managing 
director of the Empire Cream 
Separator Company of Canada, 
visited the parent company's 
headquarter^-at Bloomfield, N^J-, 
last month. There will be no 
slackening of the sales effort of 
'the Empire Company in Canadian 
territory the coming year. 

James Winram, implement 
dealer at Pilot Mound, thinks the 
big mistake which has brought 
about the present condition was 
the advance made in prices during 



the twelve months prior to tbe 
present price ^reduction period. 
Now, he says, when customers 
see prices beginning to decline 
gradually they want a big cut in 
prices. 

D. C. Coutts, manager of the 
Winnipeg branch of the McCon- 
nell & Fergusson advertising 
agency, has been appointed a 
member of the executive board 
of- his company, whose head- 
quarters are in London, Ont. 
This company Jhandle several 
farm equipment advertising cain- 
paigns. 

J. E. , Davies, president of the 
AJberta Foundry & Machine Co., 
has been appointed president of 
the Lethbridge Iron Works, Ltd., 
succeeding C. A. Magrath; ' Mr. 
Magrath will continue "his interest 
in the firm as vice-president, and 
V. W-. Parrish, who is secretary 
of the Alberta Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Medicine Hat, is the 
new secretary-treasurer. 



Tractor Case Settled 



Judgment was recently given 
in the court of appeal, Winnipeg, 
in the case of Minneapolis Thresh- 
ing Machine Co., vs. C. W. 
Scaulin, a farmer, at Shanawan. 
The latter purchased a tractor 
frorh the company, refusing to 
pay $1,500 balance on purchase 
on the claim that the tractor 
would not operate equally well 
on both gasoline and kerosene, 
according to warranty. ' At the 
trial, both the plaintiff's action 
and counterclaim for damages of 
the defendant were dismissed. 
The tractor company appealed, 
and unanimous judgment, with 
costs, was given them. 



Pickled people pine for brine. 



THE 

BISSELL 



DISK 
HARROW 




The more you cultivate the soil, the more valuable your land, and the 
greater your crops will be. The easier it is to cultivate, the more cultivat- 
ing you will do. Not only the lightest draught, but the best Cultivator— 
the one that will penetrate hard soil as well as soft ground — ^is the 

BISSELL DOUBLE -ACTION DISK HARROW 

Disking with the Bissell makes a perfect seed-bed. It allows greater root 
expansion for the growing crop. Bissell Double-Action Disk Harrows are 
especially suitable for use with light tractors or with horses. Above cut 
shows size suitable for light tractor. 

DEALERS -During Winnipeg Bonspiel, February 8-19, visit 
the John Deere Plow Company and look over the Bissell Line 
Factories at Elora and Ingersoll, Ont. 

Address: T. E. BISSELL COMPANY, Limited, Elora, Ont. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



21 



The Very Latest and Best Aid to Crop Production 




IS THE 



John Deere Line 

OF FARM EQUIPMENT 

ENTIRELY NEW DEVELOPMENTS^ IN THE 

"WATERLOO BOY^iMODELN) 

KEROSENE BURNING TRACTOR 



Left-hand cut shows combined fan 



and water circulating pump. Note 
how compact and accessible is this 
unit, AND ONLY ONE BELT IS 
USED. They are both mounted on 
one hardened steel shaft, equipped 
with a Hyatt roller bearing at point 
of strain. This cuts out friction and 
is a guarantee of long, dependable 
service. Note, also, fuel tank has 
been RAISED SEVERAL INCHES, 
giving added fall to the .kerosene 
from tank to carburetor. 

Right-hand cut gives details of the 
new front axle and automobile steer- 
ing device, which replaces drum and 
chain formerly used. That this is 
a mighty improvement is seen at 
once. It gives a shorter turning 
radius and greater clearance between 
the axle and ground. 




Another great structural improvement on the "Waterloo Boy" is the placing of the COUNTERWEIGHT OUTSIDE 
instead of inside the crank case, as formerly. This change gives perfect access to the bearings. It greatly faciUtates the cleaning 
ot the engine and, as in the past, the engine gives steady power with a minimum of vibration. Further, the BELT PULLEY is 
now made with a detachable rim— a great advantage in field work. Remove the pulley and there is no possibiUty of the lugs 
on the wheels packing clods of stones against it. As the pulley revolves at high speed its removal eliminates possible breakage 



John Deere "Model L'' Tractor 



Harrow 



With Yielding Lock— Which Virtually Means a Perfectly New Type 
of Implement. : Perfect Flexibility— Perfect Alignment— A Perfect Job 

This harrow is the best investment a farmer can make who owns a 
tractor and realizes the saving and efficiency of a harrow that can be perfectly 
controlled by the man on the tractor. The patented, automatic, yielding lock 
coupling is one only, but not the least important, of certain exclusive features 
in this harrow. The new yielding locks compel rear discs to penetrate 
properly — to cut the ridges left by the front discs instead of trailing in their 
furrows. It also prevents the rear section frbm swinging when one side of the 
harrow encounters more resistance than the other. 

FLEXIBLE 

DOES A COM- 
PLETE JOB OF 
DISCING 

Stones and 
stumps do not 
raise the entire 
Harrow out of 
the ground. 




t-ever for regulating 
pressure of scrapers. 

For use with any Standard Tractor. 
Convenient Angling Cranks. Patented 
Aligning Device. Adjustable Disc Scrap- 
ers. Convenient Grease Cups. :: :: 



Man on the 
engine has 
complete control 




Write for Complete Illustrated Literature. 

John Deere Plow Company 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON CALGARY EDMONTON LETHBRIDGE 



22 



Canadian Farm Implements 



li'ebruary, 1921 



Canada's Production of Binder 
Twine 



The output of binder twine in 
Canada during 1920 amounted 'to 
16,750 tons. The firms engaged 
in this industry are the Brantford 
Cordage Co., of Brantford, On- 
tario, the Consumers' Cordage 
Co., of Montreal, the Consum- 
ers' Cordage Co., of Dartmouth, 
Nova Scotia, and the Plymouth 
Cordage Co., Welland, Ontario. 
The Canadian Government re- 



ports the twine produced by tin- 
whole industry to be of tirst-rate 
quality in respect of strength, 
uniformity and length. 



Dealer's Overhead in U. S. 



Big Auto Contract 



I How is Your Stock of | 

I Bill Heads and | 
I Letter Heads? | 

I Is it running pretty low? | 

I If so write us and find j 
I out what is most up-to- | 
I date in this line. | 

I We will let you have all | 
I information promptly. | 

I The OTOVEL CO. Ltd. | 



R. D. Kerby, sales manager of 
the Olds Motor Works of Canada, 
Ltd., has just completed a con- 
tract wi'th the Breen Motor Com- 
pany, Ltd., for the distribution 
of Oldsmobiles in the provinces 
of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 
involving the purchase of $1,000,- 
000 worth of automobiles and 
trucks. 



In its report on the U. S. ini- 
pleuieut industry, the Federal 
Trade Commission in that coun- 
try, showed a range of from 1 to 
~A2 per cent as the overhead of 
implement dealers. No imple- 
ment business could be handled 
Avith a one per cent overhead, and 
no business with a 42 per cent 
overhead would be worth con- 
tinuing. Evidently the commis- 
sion did not obtain its figures 
from dealers who kept accurate 
cost records. 

;\ccording to Farm Implement 
News, the commission divided 



A Complete Printing Service 



I Bannatyne Ave. WINNIPEG | 

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiNiiiiiiii:ii!i:iiiiiii>iiii'>>>i^ 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER'S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
lil^trict. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



dealers into seven classes, ac- 
cording to the lines handled, 
placing exclusive implement 
dealers first. 

Taking the figures reported, 
with the wide range of 1 to 42, 
the commission found that the 
average percentage of overhead 
for the years 1915 to 1918 for the 
seven classes of dealers and for 
the whole were as follows: 

1915 1918 

Tiuplemeiits only 1470 11.54 

Implements and hardware . 16.67 13.48 
Implements and automobiles Oi.4o' 9.70 
Implements, autos and 

liardwaic 14.75 15.22 

Implements and lumber . . . 13.22 11.24 
Implements and general 

merchandise 15.01 13.10 

Implements and miscel- 
laneous 13.84 12.53 

Average of all 14.6)3 12.60 

AVhile these figures indicate 
that the percentage of overhead 
in the retail implement trade was 
reduced slightly during the period 
under consideration, due to vol- 
ume increasing at a greater rate 
(than expenses, the reduction ap- 
parently has not been .so large as 
poi)ularlv supposed. 



]f friendship's Avorth having, 
it's worth insuring; don't make it 
a bargain counter where you al- 
ways get the bargains. 




British 

Built— 

British 

Quality 

2, 3, 

5,7 

and 

9H.P. 



LISTER Farm Engines 



With "LISTER" Lines 

Good Business is Assured the Dealer 

--LISTER Engines Sell the Year Around 

British built, and to the British standard of durability. The best materials and best 
workmanship. High tension ignition — no batteries. Automatic lubrication. Economical 
to run. Shipped complete with skids. Lister engines are what the farmer wants. Sell 
them this spring and make money. 

--LISTER Grinders have Great Capacity 

We guarantee Lister Grain Grinders to grind more feed on the same power than any 
grinder of the same size on the market. Heavy steel shaft with extra long bearings 
gives durability and rigidity. Ball thrust bearing. Large feed trough; ample screening 
capacity. Strong, reversible plates with worm force feed. All machines are fitted with 
bagger pulley. Sold with or without base. 

--The Complete LISTER Line Includes: 

"Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene Engines, Grain Grinders and Crushers, 
Electric Lighting Plants, "Melotte" and "Lister-Premier" Cream Separators, Milking 
Machines, Churns, Ensilage Cutters, Silos, Sawing Outfits, Pumps, Pump Jacks, Power 
Pumping Outfits, etc. 





Cream Separators 

12 Sizes: Capacities, 280 to 1,300 Lbs. 

We can make immediate delivery of all sizes. The "Melotte" bowl is self- 
balancing and frictionless. Hangs free from a ball-bearing spindle. In con- 
struction and skimming efficiency the "Melotte" is the World's Foremost Separator. 

"LISTER"--the World's Leading Milker 

Our 1921 model is the last word in milkers. Lister milking machines 
have been in use all over the world for 15 years. Made in single or 
double units. Simple in design. An ordinary IJ^ h.p. engine or motor 
will operate them. The Lister Pulsator gives a perfect release of the 
teats. The cups cannot fall off, and the stroke of the pulsator can be 
altered instantly to suit the individual cow. DEALERS— Send for 
special literature. 

IS YOUR TERRITORY OPEN? IF SO, WRITE AT ONCE 
Visit US during Winnipeg Bonspiel, Feb. 8-19 

R. A. LISTER & CO. (Canada) LIMITED ^ 




LISTER Grinders 

Five Sizes. 6 to 12-lnch Plates 




MELOTTE Cream Separators 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 



LISTER Milking Machines 



February, I92i 



Canadian Farm Implements 



26 



The Price Situation 

At their recent convention, the 
Iowa Implement Dealers Associa- 
tion passed the folloAving resolu- 
tion : 

"In view of the advances which 
have been put into effect on cer- 
tain lines of farm equipment by 
manufacturers, we urge that deal- 
ers conduct their business on the 
smallest possible margin and 
most economical basis in order 
that the farmer may secure his 
requirements at the lowest pos- 
sible price. It is our hope that 
manufacturers may soon see their 
way clear 'to reduce prices in har- 
mony with the downward trend 
of farm products and other com- 
modities." 



Canada's Tire Production 

The Dominion Bureau of Sta- 
tistics at Ottawa, in a preliminary 
report on 'the rubber industry of 
Canada for the past year, in- 
dicates the existence of 32 manu- 
facturing plants, e m p 1 o y i n g 
nearly 6,000 hands, whose total 
output for 1919 is valued at 
.$56,000,000. The exports of the 
indu.stry amount to between onc- 



liftii and one-sixth uf the output. 
The i)roducts for the past' year 
comprise 1,293,000 moto r tires 
and 1,117,910 motor tubes, 158,780 
solid tires, 8,580 motor cycle tires 
and a similar number of motor 
cycle tubes. 



Cars in Manitoba 

T.ast year 36,455 automobiles 
were registered in Manitoba prov- 
ince, an increa.se of 25 per cent 
over 1919. There are now one 
resident in every sixteen in Mani- 
toba OAvning a car. Of 'the auto- 
mobiles registered in Manitoba, 
18,370, or over half, are Fords; 
1.122 Gray-Dort ; 4,248 Chevrolet ; 
1,166 Maxwell; 3,346 McLaugh- 
lin, and 2,409 are Overland. 



No Refund for Dealers 



The Government of Canada has 
refused to grant the request of 
the automombile dealers for a 
refund of the luxury tax on un- 
sold cars in stock on December 
20, when the luxury tax was re- 
moved, according to announce- 
ment made by the Retail Mer- 
chants' Association of Canada. 
It is understood that automobile 



manufacturers are devising means 
whereby relief may be granted 
the dealers. 



Germany Replacing 
Implements 

The Reparations Commission 
announce that up to December 
31st, as restitution for agricul- 
tural machinery destroyed or 
stolen, Gennany delivered 109,932 
machines and tools to France, 
and to Belgium 21,573, a 'total of 
131,505 farm implements. 



Keen ears and eyes are of as 
much importance as an active 
tongue. 



Value in U. S. Crops 

Farm crops of the U. S. A. were 
valued at $10,465,015,000 last 
year, based on December 1 prices 
paid to producers, the department 
of agriculture has estimated. 
That compares with $16,035,111,- 
000 in 1919, and $10,156,426,000 
the five-year average, 1914 to 1918, 
inclusive. 



Obituary 

Mrs. Harriet B. McCormick, 
wife of Cyrus McCormick, chair- 
man of the board of directors of 
the International Harvester Co., 
Chicago ,died in that city on 
Janauary 17th. 



Automatic Grain Pickler 

REDUCED TO $6.75 

Made by Currie Manufacturing Co., Brandon, but furnished 
with metal pail instead of wooden one. 

We are discontinuing all implements, and to move these 
immediately are offering at far below cost price to us. 
Single lots, $6.75; or lots of six or more, $6.00 each. 

TERMS, CASH—F.O.B. MOOSE JAW 

Canadian Specialty Co., Moose Jaw 




"WHAT OF THE DEMAND?" 

Certainly, sir, it will be just as good as ever, if not better this year, especially if you 
handle G. S. M. Made-in-Canada Farm Equipment. 

Our extensive line includes : The "Beaver" Kerosene Tractor, "Ideal" Windmills, 
"Maple Leaf" Grinders, "Ideal" Kerosene Engines, Concrete Mixers, Steel Saw Frames. 
Power and Hand Pumps, Pumping Equipment, Steel Tanks. We also handle Plows, 
Threshers, etc. 

Brantf ord Type ''K'' Kerosene Engines 

Assure Satisfactory Volume and Profits 

Are you satisfied with your engine profits? 

Sell the Type "K" Kerosene Engine this season and you will double your engine trade. 
The "BRANTFORD" is made in three sizes: 2, 4, 7 H.P. It has few working parts, 
a speed changing device, accurate governor and magneto ignition^ The fuel tank is built 
into the engine base. The type "K" is a great fuel saver and gives big surplus power. 
You can't go wrrong by lining up with this quality engine. Get a sample for your warehouse. 



Maple Leaf" 

The Capacity Grain Grinder 

Sizes from 6 to 15 inches 

For over 20 years these grinders have been in demand. 
Known everywhere, they sell easily. They are extra 
strong, well designed and allow a high speed run that 
means immense capacity. Many patent features give you 
splendid sales arguments. 



The Double Geared Pumping 
WindmiU that is "Ideal" 

Twenty years continuous service is a common report 
on this line, because : It is the simplest and strongest 
double-geared windmill made. Its roller and ball bear- 
ings insure running in the lightest breeze, and with 
minimum amount of lubrication. The "Ideal" never 
blows down if properly erected, and to assure correct 
installation, capable windmill experts will be furnished 
to erect the complete outfit, if required. 



The New Beaver 15-30 Will Lead the Market 

Get Our Attractive Sales Proposition At Once 

Here are a few points worth considering: The 1921 "Beaver" has a larger 4 cylinder Waukesha motor. 
5 by 614 inches, which develops 50 H.P. on the belt. It is a perfect kerosene burner and has a patented seven- 
speed friction transmission, reducing the working parts 15 to 20 per cent. This gives smooth, flexible power at less 
cost per acre, and a speed range for all belt work. The "Beaver" has a very strong frame, heavy crank-shaft and 
extra large bearings. Notice the light but rigid cab. 

An attractive commission and quantity discount goes 
with the " Beaver " agency. Canadian-made. No duty- 
no exchange -a reasonable price. Secure territory to-day. 




Goold Shapley&MuirCo. Limited 

Distributing Warehouses: Portage la Prairie, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon 

Factory— Brantf ord Western Head Office— Regin a 




24 



Canadian Farm Implements 



~ February, 1921 



The Time for Action 



Under present conditions deal- 
ers must take advantage of every 
legitimate means of securing busi- 
ness. Lines that are fast moving 
and that can be sold for cash, 
such as specialties and small 
goods, should receive attention. 
Business should be encouraged 
when it canot be forced. 

To-day the dealer and his staff 
should remember that courtesy 
and smiling service, coupled to 
good lines, are the three great 
assets of retail success. 

This is the time when the busi- 
ness whiner should be ostracized, 
the grouch banished, the dis- 



couraged inspired. Inertia begets 
inertia ; every complaint imagines 
another. 

Super-effort in 'the office, fac- 
tory, on the road, behind the 
counter, will do more to blow 
away the clouds of uncertainty 
and put the implement business 
on a soundly economic basis than 
all the theories that ever have 
been or ever will be expounded. 



A New Swiss Tractor 



A new type of tractor, manufac- 
tured at Berne, Switzerland, was 
shown in operation for 'the first 
time a month or two ago. This 
is a fore-carriage tractor with two 



driving and steering wheels and 
two rear wheels. The engine is 
4-cylinder, developing 16 to 20 
h.p. 

By means of a reversing coup- 
ling, without gear changing or 
toothed gearing the tractor can 
go forwards or backwards a't will. 
Reversing is done without shock, 
even if the controls are jerked 
roughly into place. This arrange- 
ment allows of the machine work- 
ing with one or two two-way 
plows, fience it does not need 



A New Use For a Farm Tractor 



Every little while we learn of 
a tractor doing an uniisual or 
novel stunt. Have you ever 
thought of a tractor as a house- 
moving appliance? Here, how- 
ever, we picture a little tractor 
doing this unusual stunt. 

This moving day scene was 
"filmed" at New Rockford, N.D. 
One of the implement dealers in 
that town had occasion to move a 
16x24 foot, one and a half-story 



MaE oil wagon 

TANKS 




Will be a profit- 
making investment 
for the oil using 
farmers in your district 

AND 

a profitable line for you to handle and push 
the sale of. 

This is the time of the year in which to get 
your list of prospects prepared and to begin 
sending them the literature that will prepare 
them for the display of a sample later. 

WRITE TO-DAY AND LET US KNOW 
HOW MANY CIRCULARS YOU NEED 

Western Steel Products Limited 



WINNIPEG 

Man. 



REGINA 

Sask. 



CALGARY 

Alta. 



EDMONTON 

Alta. 




Case tractor acts as a "moving day" expert. 



to turn at the end of the furrow. 
There is no differential in 'the 
machine. Each driving wheel 
may be disengaged and run loose 
on the axle. Turning is accom- 
plished by disengaging the wheel 
on the inner radius of the turn. 



It's no't necessarily talk alone 
that put over a proposition ; it's 
suggestion, persuasion and deter- 
mination. 



The Famous "GARDEN CITY FEEDER" 



The World's Best 
Band- Cutter and 
Self-Feeder. 



Every Owner of a Threshing 
Machine NEEDS it. 

Why don't YOU sell it to him? 

GENEROUS commissions paid 
to LIVE agents. 




No DEAD ones wanted. 



ASK AKY OF THE FOLLOWING FIRMS FOE COMTRACT 



The GARDEN CITY FEEDER CO., Ltd., Regina, Sask. 

BRUCE DAVISON CO., Brandon, Man. W. S. MUNROE CO., Calgary, Alta. 

A. E. GARDINER, Saskatoon, Sask. MART McMAHON, Lethbridge, Alta. 

P.S.— WE ALSO SELL THE CASWELL ADJUSTABLE BELT GUIDE 



frame building to another part of 
the town, so he merely mounted 
the building on w^heels — hooked 
on a Case 'tractor, and avi^ay they 
went much to the satisfaction of 
scores of onlookers ' to whom it 
looked like an ant moving a large 
ant hill. At some points in its 
travels, the tractor had to cross 
some very soft spots in 'the road, 
at times the rear wheels of the 
wagon on which the load was 
mounted went down to the hubs, 
but like the elephants in the cir- 
cus, the tractor pulled it outl 



Dakota Dealers Recommend 
Standard Contract 



At their recent convention, the 
South Dakota Implement Dealers' 
Association passed a strong resol- 
ution on the subject of contracts. 
The resolution read: 

"We heartily recommend the 
adoption of a standard and uni- 
form contract to be used by the 
manufacturers of all farm ma- 
chinery, to be simple in form and 
stating in plain and simple lang- 
uage the terms of the contract; 
the amount of discount; services 
to be rendered, and territory in- 
volved, in such a way that there 
will be no possibilities of these 
terms being misunderstood by the 
contracting parties." 



Book-keeping is possibly a 
nuisance, but it's a thing that 
you've got to see to if you want 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



25 



This photograph shows first 
45-65 H. P. Avery Tractor 
bought by W. T. Campbell 
&» Son. Photographs below 
show five additional Avery 
Tractors also owned by 
Mr. Campbell. 




Building ^'Dirt Boulevards'' 
With Avery Road Tractors 

A few years ago W. T. Campbell & Son of Council Bluffs, Iowa, purchased 
an Avery Road Tractor. It did such satisfactory work that they purchased 
another and another until today they have six of these great power units at 
work in Iowa, building "Dirt Boulevards," the finest dirt roads in America. 
Avery Road Tractors are doing the same fine work in building good roads 
on all sides of the globe. Ten years of actual service has made them the 
world's champion road building tractors. On account of their greater 
simplicity and durability, they stand up under hard road building work 
better than any other power, giving service at the lowest possible cost. 

Avery Road Tractors are guaranteed to build roads 50 per cent cheaper than 
the same work can be done with horses or mules, and also do it better. This 
means cutting road building costs in two, or building two miles of better roads 
for the present cost of one. 

The demand everywhere is for better roads and more of them. Avery 
Dealers right now are finding this class of business to be very profitable. 
Here are the tractors that will enable you to make the most of the sales 
opportunities for road building outfits in your territory. This is business 
that will pay any dealer to develop. It is profitable — easy to take care of 
— and is growing fast. 

There are seven sizes of Avery Tractors — a size for every kind of road 
building and maintenance work. Besides special road tractors, the Avery 
Line includes complete line of motor farming machinery including farm 
tractors, plows, separators, motor cultivators, motor trucks and tillage tools. 

Ask if the Avery Agency is open in your territory. 



AVERY CO. Factory and Main Office, Peoria, I11.,U.S.A. 

Western Canadian Distributors: 

m CANADIAN AVERY CO. LTD., WINNIPEG, MAN. 

^^^L Branches: Regina and Calgary. Sub-Branch: Edmonton 

m Tractc 



Branches: Regina and Calgary. Sub-Branch: Edmonton 

iVERY 

Tractors,Trucks.Motor Cultivators, 
ThrGshers. Plows, etc. 




2 b 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



French Market for Machinery 



The principal drawback to the 
French importation of far m 
machinery is the abnormally high 
exchange rate, which adds enor- 
mously to the prices of all imple- 
ments. Because of the need of 
implements, tariff provisions have 
been enacted so that duity should 
not apply to machinery or spare 
parts. But tractors, engines and 
hay presses not being classified 
in France as agricultural ma- 
chines, can only be imported 
under the increased tariff. Under 
the new tariff' the dujty on binder 
twine makes it difficult to import 
foreign twine notwithstanding its 
superior quality, in competition 
v>'ith the French manufactured 
product. 

The French Government is 
legislating with a view of en- 
couraging and assisting the 
French manufacturers of tractors. 
On December 26, 1919, the decree 
which accorded a subsidy o[ 50 
per cent on the purchase price of 
tractor-plowing outfits was ab- 
rogatted, and a new system of 



premiums was introduced. The 
new regulation grants a subsid\- 
of 25 per cent for tractors of 
French manufacture and only 10 
per cent for tractors of foreigr 
make. 

It is estimated that the French 
manufacturers will produce 
10,000 tractors for the season Of 
1^)21 ; they are now turning out 
from 25 to 30 tractors a day. 



Windmills as Current Producers 



A windmill has been developed 
in the United States that is 
claimed to solve the problem of 
electric current production from 
wind. The mill is so designed as 
to allow for variations in the wind 
— either low or high speed of the 
mill — and automatically cuts in 
and out, conserving the use of the 
storage battery and the energy 
accumulated. The general use of 
such a mill Avould mean that cur- 
rent may be available, at low cost, 
for all purposes in the farm home 
and buildings. 



Spend less time looking at the 
liirds and a^ou'11 get farther ahead. 



Better Because of the 
War! 

For years our plant was under Government control. 
Every effort of our employees was centred on shell 
making. 

Into every man in our employ was drilled the 
necessity of hair's breadth accuracy. 

LONDON ENGINE 

The same attentioh to accuracy that was developed 
in war time is carried out by the experts retained 
in our employ. 

The London Engine is as perfect as the shells that 
helped win the war. 



A MIGHTY mPINC HAND. 



4t 




Sweatthemachine andnotthe man" 

said Lord Leverhulme when 
asked his method of getting ^..^s*^?" ' 
greater pro- 
duction. 

Let a "Loa 
don" Engine do '^HIH^^Mi 
the hard work. 
You'll find in it 

'Tour RIGHT arm of Power*' 

You know that vertical type engines 
are used in all autos because they have 
proven best. Well, the "LONDON" is 
that kind of engine. No tank, no packed 
joints, no freezing — a compact, simple, 
Y.illing worker, and a giant for power, 
^ully guaranteed and moderately priced. 

Writs for Polder. 
LONDON GAS PCWER CO., Limited 

32 Vark Street, London Canada 3 




Well- Known Speaker at 
Convention 



Curtis M. Johnson, the well- 
known implement dealer-orator 
from the United States gave sev- 
eral addresses at the annual con- 
vention of the Western Retail 
Lumbermen's Association, held 
in Winnipeg, January 26-28. Mr. 
Johnson had as one of his sub- 
jects, "The Cost of Doing Busi- 
ness." Dr. Stanley Krebs, Phila- 
delphia, business lecturer was 
another of the principal speakers 
at the convention. 



protecting both purchaser and 
seller and adopted by our associa- 
tion, be used by all dealers." 



A New Mower Attachment 



The Matter of Terms 



At their recent convention, the 
Indiana Implement Dealers As- 
sociation passed the following 
resolution on terms : 

"The present method of selling 
puts the implement and tractor 
business practically on a cash 
basis. The banks do not look 
with favor on long-time paper 
under the present financial con- 
ditions. This should make the 
dealer cautious in his purchases 
and extremely careful in regard 
to the class of paper he accepts. 
The dealer should require notes 
from his customers 'that would be 
considered good by the banker 
Avithout the dealer's endorsement. 
We also recommend that the form 
of endorsement for lease notes 



The Cutmore power mower, 
designed and built for the Ford- 
son tractor, is being manufactured 
and sold by the T. W. Meiiklejohn 
Co., Fond (111 Lac, Wis. It is 
attached directly to the tractor 
and derives its power from the 
rear end of the worm shaft. A 
special advantage to this drive is 
that the pitman travels in direct 
ratio to the rear drive wheels; in 
other words, the motion of the 
sickle is the same as that for a 
conventional mower. 



Hart-Parr will Hold Conventions 



During March the Hart-Parr 
Company, Charles City, Iowa, 
will hold a series of conventions 
in the Canadian West. These 
meetings will take place at Cal- 
gary, Edmonton and Saskatoon. 
D. E. Darrah, manager of sales 
promotion, will be at the meet- 
ings, and Hart- Parr dealers should 
find the conventions invaluable in 
securing sales ideas for the de- 
velopment of local tractor trade. 



A penny for your thought; a 
dollar for vour order. 



Tractor Agency for Manitoba, 
Alberta and British Columbia Open 




TlHE General Ordnance Company of Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, Derby, Conn., New York, etc., are 

open to appoint distributors for "G-0" Farm 
siSSi Tractors for the Provinces of Manitoba, 
Alberta and British Columbia and applications are 
invited from business firms or individuals who are 
financially able to handle a whole province on a dis- 
tributing basis. Correspondence is also invited from 
dealers desiring a local territory. Address reply torr 

The General Ordnance Co. 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, U.S.A. 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



27 



WINNIPEG 
FACTORY 

of the 
TWIN CITY 
SEPARATOR 
COMPANY 



Home of the 
FAMOUS 
BULL DOG 
MILLS 





^''^'^^TO, CO. 



LTD 



I M 




^ ■ .■JL \ i — .kf^-jaJ.'^ Art..- 



The Largest 
FANNING 
MILL FAC- 
TORY in the 
BRITISH 
EMPIRE 



"Our Product 
is the Reason" 



BULL DOG Fanning Mills 

The Largest Exclusive Line of Grain Cleaning Machines Made. : Eleven Sizes 
of Mills--24 to 64-inch Sieves. : Capacities 25 to 1,000 Bushels per Hour. 

Is the mill you sell 100% efficient? Don't waste time trying to sell unproven 
grain cleaners. Handle the BULL DOG. You get the trade. This year the farmer 
will need every bushel he can grow. The Bull Dog assures him clean, sturdy, graded 
seed, bigger yields and better prices. Next fall, cleaning with the Bull Dog, he gets the 
highest grade and conserves all dockage to turn into feed. This is a year 
when the Bull Dog is a real essential to the farmer. 




Note double auger conveyor ; on 

64-inch Bull Dog with Screenings 



t 



"or screenings — one for seed grain 

Sacker and Wagon Box Elevator 



DEALERS: 

"BULL DOG " 
EFFICIENCY 

Has NEVER Been 
EQUALLED. 

Concentrate 
Sales Effort on 
This Line. 



ORDER YOUR 
SPRING 
STOCK 
NOW! 



1921 BULL DOG MILLS 

Equipped with fores feed rolls, also 
patent weed screen sieve, delivsring all 
fine seeds to side of mill. Show yaur 
customers what th-jy will do on the 
dirtiest mixture you can get. 



Ask for Prices 
and Liberal 
Agency Offer. 




THE 

BULL DOG 
SMUT 
CLEANER 





The New 
Improved 
40-Inch 
BULLDOG 
with Power 
Attachment 
and Wagon 
Box Elevator 



Get the 
Agency 



Bull Dog Wild Oat Separators 
And Barley Cleaners 

3, 6 and 12-Roll 

Specially designed machines for takin? Wild 
Oats out of Tame Oats, Wheat and Barley— 
and they DO IT. 

EVERY FARMER NEEDS ONE 



Clean Seed is a 
vital necessity 
this year. Our 
smut machine 
has extra long 
carrier for wagon 
box delivery. 

False perforated 
bottom in carrier. 

No liquid wasted. Galvanized, rust- 
proof tank. Two sizes, 18 and 24. 



Note the Weed Screen in front. Grain passes over 
before delivering to shoe, elminating all sn3.all seeds. 

Gjf the Bull Dog Agency. Taki out a sivv 
from th^ upper Shoe. Turn it over. Not 
the construction. Impossible to sag. This 
tells the tale. The most profitable 
machine made. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

TWIN CITY SEPARATOR 
COMPANY, LilKITED 



WINNIPEG 



MANITOBA 




28 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



How Farm Implement Dealers May Build Up 
a Successful Business in Power Farming 
Equipment 

J. p. Gregg, Canadian Sales Manager of the Hart-Parr Company 



The day of the "silk shirt" has passed 
away. The day of the essential in busi- 
ness has arrived. Dealers or merchants 
who have been handling non-essential 
goods, during the past few years, to-day 
face a crisis in their business. The 
readjustment period through which we 
are passing has shown the buying public, 
as never before, that only essentials are 
necessary to their life and success. 
Therefore, the first thing any person 
wishing to enter the merchandising busi- 
ness should decide is to handle something 
which is fundamentally necessary. Their 
entire future success or failure rests on 
that decision. 

An Essential Commodity 

In choosing the merchandising of some 
product, what line could be more funda- 
mentally right, or more universally in 
demand, than tractors, and power farm- 
ing implements, which have for their 
purpose the increasing of food products 
and the lowering of their production, 
cost? Just so long as men eat, crops 
will be sown, cultivated, harvested- and 
marketed. Each year that rolls by will 
find a certain percentage of agricultural 
machineiy discarded — worn out — which 
must be replaced. Each year will see 
an ever increasing army of converts to 
the great idea of power farming, who 
will need new machinery to put their 
ideas into operation. Someone must 
answer this need. Someone will sell 
them this machinery for food production. 
Every bit of territory where food can be 
produced is a potential market, and just 
as agriculture is a universal industry, 
so the marketing of agricultural goods 
is an inevitable business. 

Lowering Production Cost 

There is only one way that the farmer 
can make money to-day and that is by 
the introduction of modern methods of 
farming which will increase production 
and at the same time lower the cost of 
production. If the present period of re- 
adjustment has accomplished nothing 
else, it has sounded the death knell of 
old stereotyped farm methods. The 
farmer who has been using old methods 
during the past year is the farmer who 
has lost heavily. To-day, to succeed, 
the ground must be properly prepared, 
and the crop seeded on time, harvested 
on time and marketed on time. Quick 
and efficient work can only be done 
through the use of tractors and tractor 
drawn implements. The manufacturer 
who has tried to compete in the open 
market with old time methods and old 
time machinery was the first to go under. 
He could not meet the competition of 
new methods and new ideas, which make 



cheaper production possible. The same 
principle applies to the farmer. He 
must meet world wide competition with 
modern implements and modern methods. 
Price fixing for his crops will play no 
part in the ultimate solution of his 
problem. The application of power farm- 
ing to his problems is one which he must 
inevitably choose if he is to succeed. 

A dealer who handles tractors and trac- 
tor drawn implements holds a unique place 
in the industry. It is his duty and his 
privilege to disseminate power farming 
knowledge. Great work is being done 
by our agricultural schools and colleges. 
Yet the serious minded power farming 
dealer, in order to be successful, must 
create his own market and show to the 
farmer by actual figures and by actual 
demonstration the saving he can make 
by investing in modern power farming 
implements. The serious minded power 
farming dealer, then, is not only a 
merchandiser, he is an educator, whose 
privilege it is to instruct those to whom 
he would sell. He is a leader of men, 
not a follower. He creates conditions 
which will make sales and increase his 
profits. Such leadership by a dealer 
needs courage, initiative, and farsighted- 
ness; but the ultimate returns will be 
commensurable to the efforts he puts 
forth. 

Dealer Must be a Specialist 

Again, the serious minded power farm- 
ing dealer, if he is to lead and instruct 
the farmer buyer, must be a power 
fanning specialist. The day of the im- 
plement dealer who handled everything 
under the shining sun is past. The 
successful dealer is no longer a vendoi- 
of goods. He is a specialist who knows 
well the few things that he does handle. 
This is an age of specialists. Look at 
those around you who have succeeded 
and they are the ones who concentrated 
upon a few things and did those tilings 
well. The world to-day is looking for 
the man who knows one thing well. 
To be successful, then, a dealer must 
know all there is to be known about 
power farming. He must have the 
ability to disseminate that knowledge 
so that when farmers in his territory 
are all awakened to the need of power 
farming methods, they will come to that 
dealer because he is recognized as the 
source of siich knowledge in that com- 
munity. There is no greater asset to 
any dealer than the fact that he is a 
specialist and knows his business well. 
The Choice of a Line 

Having decided to be a serious minded 
dealer, the first thing necessary is to 
choose a line of power farming • imple- 
ments in which he -has confidence and 



on which he is willing to stake his 
reputation. When a maai enters the 
power farming business he stakes his 
reputation that the implement which he 
handles will give value received to the 
purchaser. To be successful, the power 
farming dealer should secure only trac- 
tors and implements which have built 
up a reputation through long years of 
quality, performance, simplicity, econ- 
omy and long life. He should investigate 
carefully the compamy that put out, these 
products and absolutely refuse to market 
their product unless the company back 
of it is one of stability and character. 
No dealer can afford to sacrifice his 
reputation simply on the picture drawn 
by some smooth-tongued salesman. In 
choosing the tractor which he handles, 
the wise dealer will choose the one which 
will give the most power, for the longest 
time, at the least cost. In choosing 
the implements which he expects to sell, 
he will choose those implements which 
will give the most service for the 
longest time at the least^ cost. These 
things are fundamental. 

Analyzing the Territory 

Having decided upon the line which 
he will handle, the serious minded dealer, 
to be a success, must then analyze his 
territory until he knows absolutely the 
peculiar conditions of every part of it. 
He must then take the sales plans which 
are put out by the company whose 
product he handles, and adapt those 
plans to the needs of his territory. No 
dealer can succeed without system. He 
should use all the sales helps which he 
can secure . He should install an office 
system which will be accurate, simple 
and efficient and then should work the 
system. No system is of any value 
unless it is worked to the limit. Know 
your territory, know your sales system 
and work it. The wise dealer will see 
to it that he handles tractors and imple- 
ments put out by companies that have 
a sales system for him, which has proved 
its worth through years of successful 
field success. 

The Matter of Financing 

The serious minded dealer must realize 
that he can only succeed if he runs his 
business in a business-like way. In the 
modern implement business the banker 
plays an important part. Credit is 
necessary for the dealer to handle the 
large stocks which he must carry and 
the basis of credit is confidence. The 
wise dealer, therefore, must see to it 
that the utmost confidence exists be- 
tween himself and his banker. It will 
be his duty to educate .the banker to 
the possibilities of the implement busi- 
ness, to show him that his business is 
essential, to keep him informed monthly 
of the status of that business and above 
all, to show that banker where definite 
returns co^e to him and his bank as a 
result of the implement business. No 
dealer has any right to expect confidence 
from a banker unless he first is frank 
and open in all his dealings with that 
banker. The basis of that frankness, 
that confidence on which all credit must 
be built, is a monthly business report 
to the banker who is backing him. The 
tractor or implement company with 
years of successful field experience will 
see to it that their dealer has such a 
report form and uses it as part of his 
sales system. Too much emphasis can- 
not be laid upon this point. 

Persistence plus Perspiration 

Having secured his line of implements, 
having installed his sales svstem, and 
having established his line of credit, the 
serious minded dealer must then get 
down to actual sales work which pro- 
duces results. In the merchandising of 
tractors and other imnlements, there is 
iust one fundamental way to secure 
business and that is by continuous effort. 
Continuous sales effort produces results. 
That continuous sales effort must have 
as its foundation siiitable advertising and 
publicity which will pave the way for 
sales. Advertisinsr is one of the founda- 
tions of a successful implement business. 
In a given territory, out of 102 dealers 
reported as undesirable in 1920, 99 of 
them had carried no advertising. The 
reason for failure is self-evident. There 



is a law of averages which holds true 
in all lines of business, namely; that 
results are in proportion to the effort 
put forth. The serious minded dealer 
realizes this and in season and out of 
season and by steady, persistent business 
effort, steady advertising, steady can- 
vassing, steady education of his pros- 
pects, he paves the way for a large 
percentage of the possible sales in his 
territory. Dull times may come, but the 
persistent dealer who gets out and works 
continuously will get his share of busi- 
ness and succeed where the dealer who 
does not persist fails and passes out of 
business. There is no easy road to 
success in the power farming business. 
Success comes only over the rough road 
of hard, persistent work, and there is 
no other way. 

Educational Service 

The serious minded dealer of farm 
implements to-day is basing his success 
upon a service to his farmer owners, 
which is educational. The old method 
of marketing goods without rendering 
service to the owner is past. The suc- 
cessful dealer to-day is basing his success 
upon the satisfaction of his owners. 
That satisfaction can only come when 
the owner has been educated so that 
he understands his tractor or other im- 
plement so that he can give service at 
all times, so that he can install all 
repairs, so that he can get value re- 
ceived' from his investment without the 
aid of an expert service man or advisor. 
This is true service — the service which 
is educational. 

If this fundamental in service be true, 
as we believe it is, then every dealer 
who handles tractors and farm imple- 
ments must carry a line of repairs. 
Service without repairs is impossible. 
Of the above 102 undesirable dealers, '94 
of them refused to carry repairs. The 
inevitable outcome was that their cus- 
tomers were dissatisfied, the machines 
were laid up for long periods awaiting 
repairs and this resulted in big losses 
to their owners. This lack of service 
reacted in adverse criticisms of the im- 
plements and killed future sales. Repairs 
are absolutely essential to the success 
of an implement dealer. 

After all, the success of any merchan- 
dising business rests on the people it 
serves. Satisfied customers are an im- 
plement dealer's greatest asset and the 
wise dealer builds on that satisfaction 
until every owner becomes a potential 
salesman for him, radiating satisfaction 
and selling his goods because of that 
satisfaction. Nothing succeeds like suc- 
cess, and the wise implement dealer 
to-day capitalizes the successful opera- 
tion of the tractors and other machines 
which he markets. 

How can an implement dealer build 
up a successful business this year? 
There is only one way and that is by 
building upon fundamentals. Agriculture 
is fundamental. Power farming imple- 
ments are essential. "Knowledge of 
Power." When the serious minded dealer 
has that knowledge of his territory and 
of his business which is necessary for 
its successful operation, then and only 
then will results come his way. It 
matters not whether he is located in 
north or south, east or west, certain 
fundamentals govern that business. It 
doesn't matter whether cotton is selling 
below cost of production, whether oats 
are 30 cents or wheat is $1.50. If he 
has founded his business upon these 
fundamentals and builded wisely, success 
will come to him ultimately. This year 
— 1921 — holds tremendous opportunities 
for the man of vision, of nerve and of 
judgment. Nothing can stop him. 



Sask. Dairy Production 



Dairy Commissioner Reid an- 
nounces that dairy production in 
Saskatchewan during- 1920 total- 
led $21,900,120. This total in- 
cludes butter, $12,676,670 ; cheese, 
$11,360; ice cream, $799,090 milk 
and cream, $8,413,000. 




PACKER 

AND 

MULCHER 



A 



N im- 
proved 




implement 
with two 
rows of re- 
volving wheels. Back row of wheels is held to the ground by stiff 
tension springs. Each wheel is concaved to a sharp apex and will 
mulch, pulverize and pack any soil. Fitted with roller bearings. Seat 
is attached on the hammock principle for easy riding. Long poles are 
furnished for use with horses or short poles for use behind tractors. 
Manufactured in a variety of sizes, eight feet and wider. Their use will 
increase the yield from the land. For free booklet, write Dept. L 

T. E. BISSELL CO , Limited, ELORA, Ont. 

Fcctcries tt Elora end InSersoll, Ont. 



Bissell Implements sold by John Deere Plow Co. 
Agents and Dealers 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



29 



A Pair of Tractors to 
Meet Any Competition 

The new two-plow Hart- 
Parr 20 is built along the 
same lines as the famous 
Hart -Parr 30 — built by 
the Founders of the 
Tractor Industry. With 
this pair you can go out 
and meet any competi- 
tion because you have a 
two-plow tractor for the small farmer and 
a three- plow tractor for the large farmer. 

Our dealer contract is based on the idea that your 
interests as well as ours must be protected. It is a 
two sided contract. Discounts are large enough to 
satisfy any reasonable dealer — much better than any- 
thing we have been able to offer heretofore. We 
allot enough territory to our dealers so they can sell 
a large volume of tractors and make large profits. 

The Hart-Parr dealer receives a rebate of 50 per cent 
on his local advertising, besides he has a guaranteed 
price and our genuine co-operation, so that he can 
sell tractors every month in the year. 




Grab the 
Hart-Parr 
contract — 
if you 
can get it 



Hart- Parr Dealers are Prosperous 

Some choice territory still open. Drop us a line 
today stating what territory you wish to handle. 

HART-PARR COMPANY 

Founders of the Tractor Industry 
252 Lawler St. :: Charles City, Iowa 




Many of the old Hart- 
Parrs that plowed the 
virgin prairies of the 
Northwest are still in 
use today. The grreat 
grand-daddy of all 
Tractors was old Hart- 
Parr No. 1, built in 1901. 




30 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Selling Expense in the U.S. 
Implement Industry 



Figures compiled by the U.S. 
Federal Ti'ade Commission show- 
that nearly 75 per cent of the net 
sales in the implement trade are 
made by companies whose selling 
expenses A^ary from 8 to 12 per 
cent. 

A review on the subject in 
"Farm Machinery" shows that the 
above commission has compiled 
interesting data for the years 
from 1913 to 1918, showing the 
aggregate advertising outlays Of 
tAventy-two of the leading U.S. 
producers of far m operating 
equipment — firms that make 85 
per cent of the sales in the trade. 
The statistics of the Trade Com- 
mission show that in 1913 the 
twen'ty-two firms spent for adver- 
tising just short of $3,000,000. 
From 1914 to 1917, inclusive, the 
combined expenditures in no year 
fell below^ $2,000,000, but never 
came within a quarter of a million 
dollars of the appropriation in 
1913. In 1918, however, there 
was a sharp bound upward and 
the grand total of advertising 
expenditures by the trade leaders 
was $3,253,165. 



During 'this entire period the 
advertising expenditure in no 
year amounted to as much as 10 
per cent of the total selling ex- 
pense, although in 1913, and again 
in 1918, it was only a fraction of 
a per cent short of ten. At low 
ebb, in 1915, it was below 8 per 
cent. In the splitting up of 'the 
selling budget, year by year, 
salaries took around 45 per cent, 
sometimes a little more; sales- 
men's expenses were close to 26 
per cent all the while ; and mis- 
cellaneous expenses fluctuated 
from 10 to 20 per cent. Thus 
the advertising item was 'the most 
modest of the four classified out- 
lays. The greatest proportion of 
the advertising outlay went for 
space in farm papers as a means 
of reaching ultimate consumers. 

The average retail implement 
dealer in the United States was 
found to have an advertising out- 
lay of betw^een .25 and .50 per 
cent of sales for both implement 
and hardware and implement 
dealers. In some' cases the 
dealer's advertising ran as high 
as 2.75 per cent. 



What the Feed Grinder Means 



Some men grow, others just 
swell. 



Reports from practical farmers 
show that grinding feed on the 
farm is one of the most economi- 
cal applications of the engine to 
farm work. "I have often paid 
as high as twenty-five cents a 
bushel to have feed ground," says 
one farmer, "and that wasn't all. 
Think of the time lost in going 
and coming when one is depend- 
ent upon the feed mill!" The 
engine and grinder he has, turns 
out 25 bushels of feed in an hour, 
at a small cost. 

The engine-driven feed grinder 
has been introduced into farming- 
operations at a very opportune 
time, not only because of the 
saving of time and money it rep- 
resents, but because in modern 
farming the use of feed is grow- 
ing much more extensive than it 
was formerly. Dairymen have 
found feeding all the year round 
a balanced ration of proteins, and 
fats, in addition to pasturage, 
brings in big added profits be- 
cause of the increased percentage 
of butterfat in milk which results. 

In selling feed grinders, the 
dealer has a line that goes well 
with engine business. Grinders 



cannot be sold successfully from 
a catalog. Local advertising and 
demonstration are necessary. The 
dealer should belt up his display 
engine to a grinder and show 
its efficiency in doing the work. 
He should secure manufacturers' 
literature and send it out to his 
customers who are prospects for 
this line. Feed grinders will be 
found a line that affords most 
satisfactory business in many 
territories. 



Chase Tractors Appoint 
Distributors 



R. McKay, manager of the 
Chase Tractors Corporation, Win- 
nipeg, announces that he has 
appointed Messrs. Boyd and Rug- 
gles, Regina, as distributors for 
Chase and Beeman tractors for 
the southern half of Saskatche- 
wan. The Tractor Co., Saska- 
toon, have been appointed Chase 
and Beeman distributors for the 
northern half of the province. A 
good stock of tractors and repairs 
will be carried at both points so 
that dealers throughout Saskatch- 
ewan may be assured promp't ser- 
vice. 




Handle E-B A-5 Drills 
and You get the Trade 

Supplied in 12, 16, 20 and 22 sizes — 
single disc, double disc and shoe types. 
They assure uniform seeding; cannot 
clog because of position of drive. 
Embody such features as internal type 
gears, self-aligning axle boxes and ,high 
and low gear driving mechanism. The 
frame is adjustable so that the continu- 
ous axle is always aligned. They sow 
the seed in the bottom of furrow, cover 
well and give an even stand. 

For Agency information 
address nearest Branch 



The E-B 12-20 Tractor is Steady 
in Sales and Steady in Performance 

An outfit for plowing and threshing that is a nation-wide favorite, the 
E-B 12-20 Model AA is in big demand. It combines lightness with great 
pulling power; steady, smooth operation with economical consumption of 
fuel. It has the strong, compact construction and mechanical efficiency 
that farmers demand. All working parts are enclosed. Equipped with 
Hyatt roller bearings, 
K-W magneto, Bantam 
ball-thrust bearings and 
Modine Spirex radiator. 
Let us show you why 
this tractor is a business- 
builder for the dealer. 




For Spring 
Trade — E-B 
Tractor Plows *^ 

2, 3 or 4-Bottoms 

Because" of their adaptability these plows are in big demand. Quick adjustment for depth; simple and 
strong self-lift device. Heavier beams than dny other make of plow. Wheels are equipped with 
magazine type, dust-proof boxes. Rear wheel and bottom easily detached, quickly turning a 2 to a 
3-bottom or a 3 to a 4-bottom plow. Equipped with E-B quick, detachable shares. 

Pay us a Visit during Winnipeg Bonspiel, Feb. 8-19 

Look over the complete line. We'll be glad to have you make our office your headquarters and to show 
you our full assortment of implements. 

ANDERSON-ROE COMPANY, Limited 



REGINA 



162 PRINCESS ST., WINNIPEG, MAN. 
SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



February, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



31 



The Importance of the Fanning 
Mill to the Farmer 

For cleaning and grading seed 
grain ,the modern fanning mill is 
a feature in equipment that every 
farmer should possess. Not only 
for seed grain, but to eliminate 
dockage in selling his crop, the 
farmer will find the fanning mill 
invaluable. Farm papers thor- 
oughly endorse the use of these 
machines. As an example, a 
recent issue of the "Nor'-West 
Farmer" says, editorally: 

"We have a report showing 
dockage in grain received at Fort 
William and Port Arthur for the 
crop year of 1919-1920. The 
average per car in bushels was 
as follows: Wheat, 26.9; oa'ts, 
28; barley, 23.4; flax, 118.3; rye, 
54.3. The average price of this 
dockage for the same period was 
$20.08 per bushel. No comment 
is necessary. But an interesting 
point about the fanning mills that 
no wants to buy at present is 
that they are made, in all sizes 
from 24 inches in width with a 
capacity of a few bushels per 
hour up to cleaners that will 
handle several hundred bushels 
per hour. 

"Modern grain cleaners will 
clean seed, and 'that it costs some- 
thing not to clean commercial 
grain is amply shown by the 
dockage figures quoted. The 
place to clean grain is on the 
farm, not at the head of the lakes, 
and the place for the dockage — 
the screenings — is the same. 
There are enough screenings in 
every car of wheat shipped last 
year to rnake 200 pounds of pork, 
and at the average price of hogs 
for the period referred to, that 
would amount to between $35 and 
$40. In other words, the 59,844 
cars of wheat carried enough stufif 
that should have been kept on 
the farms to make nearly twelve 
millioH pounds of live hogs. Of 
course, the freight on the dockage 
is an item too." 

Then, to revert to another side 
of the question : 

The "Farmers' Advoca'te" in a 
recent issue, claims that the fan- 
ning mill has infinite possibilities 
as^ a means of disease control. 
"What are the light seeds due 
to?" queries the magazine. "In- 
variably they are improperly filled 
grains due to immaturity, or they 
were prevented from filling out 
properly through presence of 
disease or other adverse features 
(frost, drought, etc.). Quite a 
number of diseases, as wheat 
scab, glume spot, certain bacterial 
troubles, as welt as flax wilt, and 
many diseases affecting vege- 
tables, produce light seed. Gener- 
ally it is the imperfectly devel- 
oped seed that bears the germ of 
disease, and it is these which 



the use of the fanning mill 
will remove, incidentally increas- 
ing the bushel weight and making 
way for a 'first prize at the seed 
fair. 

"Then there are smut diseases 
— either the smut balls proper or 
the smutted portions of ears so 
common in seed barley and oats. 
All of these may be removed by 
the fanning mill, and, if followed 
by seed treatment with formalde- 
hyde, chances of success in con- 
trolling smut are increased, be- 
sides saving the trouble of "skim- 
ming oft'" smut balls when treat- 
ing. 



"The use of heavy seeds is one 
of the principal factors in produc- 
ing uniform stands of grain, 
owing to more uniform germina- 
tion and rapid growth, and these 
are 'the factors of importance 
towards protecting crops from 
rust. 

"No mention has yet been made 
of the removal of many seeds of 
noxious weeds by this means, and 
in separating the grains of ergot 
the fanning mill, with its rocking 
and manifold sieves performs 
most valuable service. Farmers 
are well advised to look upon 
their fanning mill as a most valu- 



able implement for these and 
many other reasons." 

These reasons give, in brief, the 
strongest kind of sales arguments 
that the implement dealer can 
have in increasing his volume in 
fanning mill business. Think 
them over. Display your mills 
and talk up their value from the 
standpoint of horse-sense and 
agricultural economics. 



Don't be a hog. When you 
take a man's money, give him a 
smile and a word o' cheer in 
return. 



"WATERLOO" Champion Separators 

Canada's Foremost Threshers for over 60 years 

A SIZE FOR EVERY FARM 

20x36. 24x36, 24x32, 28x42, 
33 X 52, 36 X 56, 40 x 62 

Equipped complete with Wind Stacker, 
Feeder, Wagon Loader and Register. 
With our range of sizes you have a 
separator to sell to suit any amount of 
crop. Smaller sizes are in great demand by owners of 
light and medium weight tractors. They do splendid 
work, are easily driven and last a life-time. Grain- 
savers for the farmer — money-makers for the thresher- 
man. Let us send you literature and our 1921 sales offer. 





" WATERLOO " 
STEAM ENGINES 

In 16, 18, 22 and 25 H.P. Perfect design. 
High pressure boilers. Great steam capacity. 
Economical to operate. Smooth-running flexible 
power for both plowing or threshing. Ask for 
special catalog. 

"ROCK ISLAND " 
TRACTOR TOOLS 

Nos. 9 and 12 Tractor Plows work 
perfectly with any tractor. Have famous 
CTX moldboard. Furrow wheel lift. 2, 
3 or 4 bottoms. 

No. 38 Tractor Disc is a fast selling 
line. Gangs work independently. All 
levers operative from tractor. 8 and 10-ft. 
sizes. 

We handle : Kerosene Tractors, Tractor 
Plows, Portable and Traction Steam 
Engines, Separators, Wind Stackers. 
Baggers, Threshers' Supplies, etc. 



Heider Tractors, 12-20 and 9-16 H.P. 

NO GEARS TO STRIP 

Heider dealers have behind them the two big- 
gest selling points in the tractor business: No 
gears to strip — over 13 years satisfactory 
work in the field. Records show that the 
Heider calls for less service than any other 
tractor. In our seven-speed friction drive the 
power is taken direct from the motor fly-wheel 
by two big discs — forward and re- 
verse. No transmission gears — no 
gear troubles. Resistless pull with- 
out jerking or vibration. Complete 
control with one lever for both trac- 
tion or belt work. We can prove to 
you that the Heider is a real business- 
builder for dealers. 



Dealers:-The ^'Waterloo"-''Rock Island" 
Agency Gives Real Profits 

WRITE VS FOR 
COMPLETE 
DETAILS 




The Waterloo Manufacturing Co. Limited 

REGINA PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE SASKATOON 

Alberta Distributors: United Engines & Threshers Ltd., Calgary and Edrhonton 



32 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Case General Machinery 
Catalog for 1921 



The 1921 catalog of the J. I. 
Case Threshing Machine Co., 
Racine, Wis., is now off the press, 
and in artistic display and typo- 
graphical excellence it is, we be- 



lieve, one of the finest publica- 
tions of the kind ever issued by 
this well known company. Beaut- 
iful colorwork is evident through- 
out this 116-page book; the half- 
tone engravings of the various 
machines, set upon a tinted back- 
ground, bringing out every de'tail 



Union Bank Makes Solid Progress 

Savings Deposits Again Show Marked Increase 

There is no better proof of the confidence of the people in a banking 
institution than to see the savings deposits in that institution grow 
from year to year. The 56th Annual Report of the Union Bank of 
Canada, covering the year ended November 30th, 1920, shows a verj 
satisfactory increase in savings deposits, despite the many demands and 
calls that have been made upon the people's savings during the past 
year. Savings deposits now stand at $85,510,464, as compared wtih 
$84,376,709 in 1919 and $60,144,940 in 1916. 

The difficult period of deflation through which the country has been 
passing has presented many difficult problems to our banking institu- 
tions, but it is gratifying to note that the Union Bank is now in a 
stronger liquid position than it has been at any time in its history. 
The 1920 balance sheet indicates that the policy of the officials of the 
bank has been to build up a strong cash position, and in this they 
have been successful. Liquid and cash assets on November 30th, 1920, 
totalled $82,203,563, being equal to 54.35 per cent of the total liabilities 
to the public as compared with the ratio of 47.23 per cent in 1919. 

Two new headings appear in the statement this year which were 
included in 1919 under "Current Loans in Canada." One of these, 
"Demand Loans in Canada Secured by Grain," amounting to $10,732,- 
755.47, shows plainly that the Bank has been rendering valuable services 
in assisting the marketing of the grain crop. The other new heading is, 
"Loans to Governments and Municipalities," and amounts to $7,64?,- 
176.39. These items when totalled with "Current Loans and Discounts 
in Canada," show $88,230,716.79 or 1.96 per cent increase over 1918. 

The Directorate of the Bank recently welcomed two new members 
in the persons of Messrs. G. M. Black and D. N. Finnie, both 
• prominent business men who are well known in Western Canada and 
■ have a wide knowledge of Western affairs which will be of great 
assistance to the Bank in its efforts to render the best banking service 
possible to Western Canada. Mr. W. R. Allan, the new Vice-President 
of the Bank, is well known as the senior member of the firm of Allan, 
Killam & McKay, Winnipeg, and a director of many other important 
organizations. 

During the past year the Union Bank has been able to render 
valuable service to its clients with overseas connections as a result of 
the extension of facilities made possible by the formation of the Park- 
Union Foreign Banking Corporation, which is jointly owned and 
controlled by the National Park Bank of New York and the Union 
Bank of Canada.* The Park-Union is building up a permanent and 
profitable business in the East and has branches in Yokohama, Tokio, 
Shanghai, Paris and New York. The efforts of the Union Bank in this 
connection have been invaluable in assisting Canadians to open up 
business relations in the Orient. 

The Union Bank now has 393 branches which cover the entire 
Dominion and is thus in a position to give banking service second to 
none. In addition to its branches in Canada, the Bank operates its 
own branches in London, England, and New York. 



in construction clearly and effec- 
tively. A double page view in the 
centre of the catalog shows a 
composite photograph of the five 
plants of the J. I. Case T. M. Co. 
P'rontal views of the thirty-two 
branch houses of the company 
are also shown. 

Complete specifications of the 
full line of Case kerosene tractors 
are given. Construction details 
are represented by a series of 
plates illustrating all component 
parts of the tractors. The de- 
scriptive matter is concise and 




Front Cover Facsimile of the New Case 
Catalog 



fully explains construction with- 
out wearisome verbiage. *The 
facts are given in terse and easily 
understood phrases. A series of 
views show scenes in the Case 
shops, also Case tractors at all 
kinds of farm work. Case trac- 
tors in 10-18, 15-27 and 22-40 h.p. 
are displayed and Case steam 
engine construction and boiler 
design are an interesting section. 
Case lightAveigh't steel threshers 
will prove an interesting part of 




Increase Your Profits this Spring by Handling 



"STAR" FITTED 
PLOWSHARES 

Guaranteed Perfect in Quality, Fit and Finish 



There's a "STAR" for 
Practically Every Plow in Use 

Quick turnover and 
good profits. A line that 
makes the dealer money 
in any territory. 

FOR PROMPT DELIVERY WRITE OUR JOBBERS: 
3. H. Ashdown Hardware Co., Metals Ltd., Calgary and Wilkinson-Kompass Ltd., Wm- 

Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary Edmonton nipeg 

Western Implements Limited, Western Canada Hardware Co., F.G.Wright & Co., Winnipeg 

Regina Lethbridge 

ASK FOR 
THE LATEST 
LIST 




Finished complete with bolts, ready to 
attach to the plow. A reinforced land- 
side on all shares strengrthens the weld. 
Sell STAR Shares and you create satis- 
fied customers. 





Star Manufacturing Company 

> CARPENTERSVILLE, ILL., U.S.A. 



this catalog for the dealer, the 
design and construction being 
fully covered. The threshers are 
shown in 20x28, 22x36, 26x40, 
28x50, 32x54, 36x58 and 40x62 
sizes. Grand Detour moldboard 
and-disc tractor plows, and Grand 
Detour disc harrows complete a 
most interesting section. Silo 
fillers, road rollers, road graders 
and rock crushers are also dealt 
with. We feel sure that dealers 
will find the new Case catalog a 
valuable addition to their files. 
Copies may be obtained from the 
nearest branch houses of the 
company. 



Studebakers Still on Market 



The Studebaker Corporation, 
South Bend, Ind., has completed 
a deal with the Kentucky Wagon 
Mfg. Co., Louisville, Ky., where- 
by the Studebaker Wagon will 
be manufactured and sold by the 
latter concern. The arrangement 
includes all* finished wagons in 
Studebaker stock, all in course of 
construction, blue prints, pat- 
terns, goodwill, etc. 

All orders for wagons and parts 
should now be sent to' the ofifices 
of the Kentucky Wagon Mfg. 
Co. The Louisville plant will be 
enlarged to provide for the manu- 
facture of the new line. With the 
acquisition of 'the South Bend 
line, the Kentucky company now 
has three of the best known 
brands of farm wagons, "Old 
Hickory", "T e n n e s s e e" and 
"Studebaker". The combined out- 
put of the three will approximate 
60,000 jobs. 



The 1921 Avery Catalog 



We recently received the 1921 
general catalog of the Avery 
Company, Peoria, 111., a 100-page 
publication with very attractive 
covers in color, showing Avery 
machines in operation. The full 
line of Avery motor fanning ma- 
chinery is displayed in this in- 
teresting catalog, which opens 
with an excellent article on the 
value of power farming equip- 
ment. Avery machines are shown 
in operation at every conceivable 
farm job, from brush plowing to 
hauling livestock 'to market. 
These views show the remarkable 
adaptability of the modern trac- 
'tor. 

Constructional details of the 
seven sizes of Avery tractors are 
given, with a special section fully 
describing and illustrating the 
construction of Avery motors and 
transmissions. Every feature in 
the tractor is clearly outlined, the 
illustrations and sectional views 
being clear cut and excellent ex- 
amples of engraving. Avery 
motor cultivators and a variety 
of attachments for same are a 



February, 1921 Canadian Farm Implements 



33 



most interesting section of the 
catalog. The Avery six-cylinder 
motor truck is a section that will 
appeal to the dealer, also Avery 
plows and the full line of Avery 
threshers. The Avery factories 
and branch houses form a fitting 
finale to a very complete publica- 
tion which reflects great credit 'to 
the advertising department and 
its head, Mr. H. J. Barbour. The 
complete line of Avery goods 
eml)odies : Avery tractors, trac- 
tor attachments, motor cultiva- 
'tors, skid motors, water and fuel 
tanks, tractor, disc and brush 
plows, disc harrows, drills, grain 
threshers and motor trucks. Cop- 
ies may be had from the nearest 
branch of the company. 



riers, windmills, manure spread- 
ers, corn shellers, sprayers, feed 
grinders and portable grain ele- 
vators. 

A number of Hyatt men 
attended the show, including C. 
M. Eason, vice-president ; H. O. 
K. Meister, sales manager; F. N. 

G. Kranich, manager, implement 
bearings division ; O. W. Young, 
engineering manager; H. M. Car- 
roll, advertising manager, and 

H. G. Weaver, special representa- 
tive. 



Avery Exhibit at Columbus 



Hyatt at National Tractor Show 



In keeping with the educational 
features that distinguished the 
Columbus National Tractor 
Show, the display of the Hyat't 
Bearing Company effec- 
demonstrated the use of 
bearings in all kinds of 
farm operating equipment, includ- 
ing: Tractors, plows, motor cul- 
tivators, binders, threshing ma- 
chines, ensilage cutters, litter car- 



Roller 
tively 
roller 



The Avery Co., Peoria, 111., had 
a full line-up of their product at 
the National Tractor Show, Col- 
umbus, February 7-12. The 'trac- 
tor display included the six- 
cvlinder Model "C", and 8-16, 
12-25, 12-20, 14-28, 18-36, 25-50 
and 45-65 tractors. A variety of 
Avery motor cultivators were 
shown, also Avery separators in 
all sizes, some cut away to show 
interior design. Orchard and 
disc plows, tractor plows and disc 
harrows, also silo fillers were in 
evidence. The machines and ar- 
rangement reflected credit upon 
H. J. Barbour, advertising mana- 



Farmer 
Jones 
Packers 
NOW! 




1921 reduced prices are set. Our stocks are 
ready for shipment, and selling time is 
drawing near. So order now and be one 
of the dealers who are going to make big 
profits this Spring selling this popular 
Packer. 

If you don't know all about the Farmer Jones Packer now, 
we will send you detailed information on request. Don't 
make a mistake and stock up a line that will not sell 
quickly. Write us to-day. 



STAR 
PLOW 
SHARES 




We have a big assortment of these superior Shares 
on hand, and can fill all orders promply. 



WOOD GOODS 

We carry a full line of Wood 
Goods. Our lines are well and 
favorably known for their reli- 
able performance in actual use. 
Write for special price list. 



ORDER EARLY 

If your order reaches us early 
we can likely include your ship- 
ment in a carload lot, thus 
saving you many dollars in 
freight charges. 



F. G. WRIGHT & CO. 



72-74 HENRY AVE. 



WINNIPEG 



ger. J. B. Bartholomew, presi- 
dent, was present at the show, 
also a staff of experts. 



Saskatchewan Act has New 
Provisions 



The Saskatchewan Farm Im- 
plement Act has been altered by 
the addition of two new provi- 
sions. The first provides a pen- 



alty of $100 for each offence, 
where a vendor fails to maintain 
a sufificient supply of repairs re- 
quired for machines sold by him 
and in operation in the province ; 
and the second authorizes the 
Minister of Agriculture to appoint 
inspectors, whose duties shall be 
to inspect the stocks of repairs 
kept by vendors and who shall 
have free access during business' 
hours to the vendors' premises. 




Clean Grain and 
Clean Profits 

Follow the sale of the 

"NEW DUAL" 
CLEANER and 
SEPARATOR 

Immense capacity. Does better 
work in less time. Reduces the- 
heaviest mixtures in ONE RUN 
at a rate that would require two 
ordinary mills. Cleans and sep- 
arates twice as fast as the best 
fanning mill of the same size ever 
made. 

One Operation Cleans the Dirtiest Mixture 

The double gangs and cut-off system are the secret of New Dual efficiency. Get a 
New Dual on your floor. Prove our claims for yourself. Show the farmers how 
this mill does finished work, in a few minutes, on any combination of dirty grain. 
No middlings— no half-and-half mixtures — but PERFECT SEPARATION of Wheat, 
Barley or Oats. Complete sieve and screen equipment with every mill. To show 
it is to sell it, and the New Dual gives the dealer a better margin of profit than 
the average mill. Let us tell you about it. 

Sellthe Western Pulverizer, Packer 

and Mulcher 

It Guarantees Bigger Yields 

and Earlier Crops 
A Size for Every Farm 

PLOW PACKER— 2 ft. 6 in. two- 
furrow; 4 ft. three-furrow. 




It saves all 
the moisture 



SINGLE SECTION— 4, 
and 12 ft. sizes. 



6, 8, 10 



THREE SECTION- 
ft. sizes. 



-11, 15 and 21 



"Western" Pulverizers have revolutionized agriculture. They are different from 
any other machine on the market. Pulverize, pack and mulch the soil in one opera- 
tion, giving a seed-bed that conserves all available moisture. Wherever used, they 
have given bigger, sturdier yields and earlier harvests. They eliminate loss through 
dry seasons. Get your spring requirements — NOW. 



Lincoln Smut Cleaners 

Made in two Sizes. 
Order Now 



Sold on a positive guarantee to 
prevent smut. Separate smut 
balls, wild oats, king heads, and 
all light seed from wheat, also 
wild oats and all light seed 
from barley. Grain is thor- 
oughly pickled, dried and elevated 
to wagon box. Automatic 
skimmer an exclusive feature. 
Strong, heavy construction. 
Large, rustless solution tanks. 




The 
Cushman 
Line 
Pays 



Get the Cushman Contract forJ1921 

We are exclusive Selling Agents for: Tractors, Light Tractor Plows, Combination 
Threshing Outfits, Engines, Land Roller and Sub-surface Packer, 24x46 Tractor 
Separators, Electric Lighting Plants, "New Superior" Fanning Mills, Lincoln 
Grinders, Smut and Pickling Machines, Saws, Vacuum Washers, Shinn-Flat Lightning 
Conductors, Holland Wild Oat Separators, " Automobile Accessories, etc. 

Ask for Particulars, Prices and Agency Offer 

Cushman Motor Works of Canada, Limited 

Builders of light weight, high grade Gasoline Engines for all Farm Power Work 



DEPT. C.F., WHYTE AVE. AND VINE ST. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



34 



Canadian Farm Implements 



February, 1921 



Subscribers' 
Information Service 

Under this heading we will reply 
to enquiries from jobbers and 
dealers concerning the location of 
machine manufacturers, where re- 
pair parts may be obtained, etc. 
Endeavor always to give name of 
manufacturer. For immediate re- 
ply, enclose stamped, addressed 
envelope. Send enquiries to In- 
formation Department, CANADIAN 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, Winnipeg. 



H. L. C, Sask-^iSo far as we are 

aware there are no repair stocks for 
the Hayes corn planters carried in Can- 
ada. We advise you to write direct to 
the manufacturers, the Hayes Pump & 
Planter Co., at Galva, 111. 

J. P. B., Sask. — No firm in the Domin- 
ion is handling the "Little Major" 
h.p. engine. This engine is made by 
tJie Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 

W. McL., Sask. — Stickney engines are 
no longer being sold. The line was sold 
out some years ago. Ycni can, however, 
get repairs for the 5 h.p. model from 
the Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., 
Regina. 

H. La R., Sask. — We have no records 
of a fanning mill known as the "Jumbo". 
It is possible that you refer to the 
"Jumbo" vacuum grain cleaner and 
loader as formerly manufactured by the 
Winnipeg Steel Granary & Culvert Co. 
This was their trade name. The cleaner 
is a large and heavy machine requiring 
from 10 to 18 h.p. to operate. 

J. M. M., Sask. — You can secure piston 
rings and parts for the Stickney engine 
by addressing the Ontario Wind Engine 
& Pump Co., at Regina. 

R. & N., Sask. — -The only concern 
. manufacturing tobacco planters in Can- 
ada are the La Compagnie Bedard, at 
L'Assumption, Que. Those machines are 
used to some extent by market garden- 
ers for transplanting cabbage and 
tobacco plants. The following U.S. 
firms make this line and can quote you:* 
The Ohio Cultivator Co., Bellevue, 0.; 
S. L. Allen & Co., Philadelphia; B. F. 
Averv & Sons Co., Louisville, Ky. ; 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111.; J. D. 
Tower & Sons, Mendota, 111. 

G. A. McC, Sask. — There is no engine 
for hand car operation known as the 
-"Molliday". We feel confident that you 
mean the "Woolery", an air-cooled hand 
ear engine, distributed by the Dominion 
Equipment and Supply Co., McRae Blk., 
Winnipeg. The General Supply Co., 85 
Water St., Winnipeg, also handle an 
engine of this type — the "Sylvester" 
hand car engine. 

F. M., Man. — So far as we are aware, 
there is no machine on the market for 
driving- fence posts. The nearest ap- 
proach to such equipment is an engine- 
driven post hole auger, made by the Gus 
Pech Mfg. Co., at Le Mars, Iowa. 

C. H., Sask. — "Fresno" wheeled and 
drag road scrapers are manufactured by 
the Holt Mfg. Co., Stockton. Write 
Holt Mfg. Co., Calgary, Alta. 

K. E., Man. — Sulky plow with wheel 
boxing 2E.56 and collar 2F298 is'a Fuller 
& .Johnson plow. The only repair source 
is the Eaton Company, Winnipeg. 

G. L. T., Sask. — Top bearing spool box 
Xo. 766; bottom bearing spool box No. 
767 are for a disc harrow made by the 
B. F. Avery & Sons Plow Co., Louisville, 
Ky. Send direct to factory for necessary 
parts. 

0. & H., Sask. — The disk harrow with 
boxings marked 9.32C and lever ratchets 
930L and 9.30R is one of the Grand 
Detour make. For parts, address the 
Grand Detour Plow Division of the J I. 
Case T. M. Co., Dixon, 111. 

T. R. S., Sask.— Parts H348 and H349 
are for a Rock Island disc harrow. For 
replacement write the Northern Rock 
Island Plow Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

J. R., Man. — X667 is the intermediate 
gear, 44 teeth, on a No. 8 Massey-Harris 
drill. X673 is change gear, 34 teeth on 
same drill. X789 is the support and' 
bearing for the square countershaft. Left, 



grain drive, on same drill. The Massey- 
Han-is Co., Winnipeg, can supply these 
parts. 

B. T., Sask. — The Gade air-cooled en- 
gine is manufactured by Gade Bros. Mfg. 
Co., Iowa Falls, la. Do not think that 
repairs are carried anywhere in the West, 
so you should write factory. 

J. A. K., Man. — You can procure wheels 
for small trucks, 18-inch diameter, from 
the John Watson Mfg. Co., Winnipeg. 



Emerson -Brantingbam Have 
Not Sold Geiser Plant 



On page 11 of our January^ 
issue we reported that the Frick- 
Geiser Company, of Waynesboro, 
Pa., had purchased the Geiser 
plant at that point, as owned and 
operated by the Emerson-Brant- 
ingham Implement Company. 
We are advised by the Emerson- 
Brantingham organization that 
this is not the case, and the latter 
company announce that they will, 
continue to operate the Geiser 
plant as usual and will supply 
the various territories in which 
their branches are located with 
the full assortment of Geiser ma- 
chines for the 1921 season. 

The E m e r s o n-Brantingham 
Company, in addition to the 
Geiser plant, at Waynesboro, have 
a very large thresher plant at 
Columbus, Ind., wi'th exception- 
ally large manufacturing facilities 
to manufacture threshers for their 
trade. They will be well equipped 
this year to supply the dealer 
demand for threshers in Western 
Canada through their sales organ- 
ization in this territory, the 
Anderson-Roe Company, of Win- 
nipeg, Regina and Calgary. 



Suggests Demonstrating Mills 



A. T. Anderson, manager of the 
Standard Fanning Mill Co., Win- 
nipeg, in a recent interview, 
states that now is the time that 
the dealer should put his line of 
fanning mills on display so that 
they may be kept before the 
fanners prior to the opening of 
the season. 

The dealer, says Mr. Anderson, 
should have different dirty mix- 
tures of grain on hand to show 
the cleaning efficiency of his mills, 
and should make demonstration 
one of the most important points 
in developing a local demand for 
gTain cleaners. Demonstration, 
added to sales talk on the value 
of cleaning seed for the crop and 
cleaning in fall 'to eliminate dock- 
age, will prove sales-building for 
the dealer in the coming- season. 



U. S. Impl«rr«^nt Experts 

For the eleven months ending 
November, the exports of imple- 
ments from ithe United States 
were valued at $42,462,337 as 
compared to $39,185,551 in 1919 
and $30,272,748 in 1918. Imports 
of agricultural implements in 



November, 1920, were valued at 
$279,185 as compared to $163,945 
in November, 1919. Imports for 
the eleven months ending Novem- 
ber, 1920, of agricultural imple- 
ments were $5,550,561, compared 
to $3,077,617 in 1919 and $664,327 
for 1918. For the eleven months 
ending- 1920, g"as tractors ito the 
number of 20,673 were exported. 
Of these 1,500 were shipped last 
November. 



American Firm Shows at Lyons 
Fair 



France, too, has the custom of 
holding fall agricultural shows 
which the war stopped for a while 
but which have been resumed in 
even greater effectiveness now 
that there is a depleted national 
treasury and a slowing up on the 
farm to spur the najtion to seek 



Conditions as reported by Mr. 
Scott are improving. He visited 
a good many manufacturers in 
the United States as well as in 
Eastern Canada and found that 
in Canada they are going ahead 
just as well as they are on the 
other side. Practically all con- 
cerns are running slow with hope 
of getting to full time shortly. In 
every factory visited it is the be- 
lief that there will be a shortage 
in tractors and other lines of farm 
implements this summer for the 
reason that distributors and deal- 
ers are not placing- as big orders 
as they usually do at this- time of 
the year. Manufacturers , of 
course, cannot go ahead on their 
building program until jobbers 
and dealers place their orders. 
However, conditioiis are rapidly 
readjusting themselves; the labor 
situation is improving and even 




Internaticnal Exhibit at the Lyons, France, Fair 



the best ways of increasing pro- 
ducton. 

At Lyons, France, the Inter- 
national Harvester organization 
was effectively present at the dis- 
trict fall agricultural show and is 
ito be congratulated for the fine 
appearance of the Line. 



Scott Report i on ivianufacturing 
Situation 



T. R. Scott, manager of the 
United Engines & Threshers, 
Limited. Calgary, who are distri- 
butors for Goold, Shapley & Muir 
as well as the Waterloo Mfg. 
Company in that province, passed 
through the city on the 23rd, re- 
turning from an inspection trip 
to Brantford as well as a number 
of other factories in Eastern Can- 
ada and the United States. 

\\'hile in Eastern Cariada, Mr 
Scott arranged with the Dominion 
Steel Products Company of Brant- 
ford, to act as their distributors 
in Alberta for Dominion Light. 
The splendid org-anization rhain- 
tained by United Engines & 
Threshers, Limited, will enable 
them to do a fine business in farm 
lighting plants. ' 



the men out of work believe that 
they will be back on their jobs 
very shortly. From what Mr. 
Scott learns it seems that a reduc- 
tion of from 10% to 15% in the 
coat of manufacturing farm ma- 
chinery will be passed on to the 
consumer and that this is the only 
reduction that may be looked for 
inside of the next few years. The 
reason seems to be very plain. 
Steel mills are affected the same 
wav as the other manufacturers 
and the cost of production will 
not come down very much under 
present conditions. Another 
thing, both American and Eastern 
manufacturers are now receiving 
heavy orders from foreign coun- 
tries. This is especially true 
during the last three or four 
weeks. These orders are reported 
to be about double what they 
have been previously. It is an- 
ticipated that the foreign trade 
will rapidly develop and that the 
market will get down to a level 
where people will know how to 
buy. It is probable that grain 
prices will not be maiterially 
h''p-her than thev are at the present 
time, he believes. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



□ 



The Best Drill for the Farmer to Use Is 
The Best Drill for the Dealer to Sell 

All other considerations aside, the farm implement dealer 
or commission agent measures his profits by the degree of satis- 
faction experienced by his customers, or in plainer language- -if the 
farmer is satisfied your bank account will show it. 




McCormick and Deering Double Disk 
Front Seed Delivery Drills in the hands of Can- 
adian farmers are actually increasing the crop 
yields of the Dominion — adding hundreds of 
dollars to the incomes of individual farmers 
and increasing the business of the many dealers 
who sell these well-known drills. 



Front Seed 
Delivery 
Saves Seed 
and Increases 
Crop Yield 




These statements are not exaggerated. 
They are based on established and unquestion- 
able proof given us by owners. For instance, Mr. D. F. 
Davidson, of Calgary, reports that last season he 
increased his wheat yield 1,500 bushels by the use of 
Deering double-disk drills equipped with front seed 
delivery boots. He knows this to be a fact because he 
was enabled to make comparisons between fields seeded 
with a Deering and fields seeded with other types of 
drills. He says the difference was apparent from the start. 

Now, if the McCormick and Deering drills 
are good for the farmer to use, they are good 
for the dealer to sell. It is not hard to get business on a 
well-known and well-liked line. You can talk front 
seed delivery and make sales on that feature alone 
because every statement you make will be the truth. 
Front seed delivery boots increase the crop yield and 
you can prove it. That is the kind of talk the farmer 
likes to hear and the kind that will move him to action. 

If you will handle the McCormick or Deering 
Drill in your territory, you will profit — we will profit — and 
the farmers who use the drills will profit. Can you beat 
that combination ? 

See the blockman or write your branch house 
and arrange to get a sample up without delay 




International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA <-T» 

HAMILTON CANADA 

WESTERN BRANCHES — Branoom. Winnipeg. Man., calcary. Comonton. LeTManioOE. Alta . 

EST£VAN, N. SATTLCFORO. HEGir^TA. SASKATOON. YOmtTON, SASK. 
CASTEi'N BRANCHES ~ H*M1LTCN 1.0^:C0N OTTAWA ONT. MONTHEAU OUESCC. OOE- ST JOHM H B. 




Canadian Farm Implements 



Februaj-yy 1024 





tASTL 
Grain PicKjer, 



^^Xl IMMEESION 

_^ple to ope/a^ 
eaimot get «ntof order 

Fin iroa Of eeoof.' 

««5K FOR OUB FREE 
ANO PRICES. 



WJyW ooBHtmw to f!ut Loudeo 8teet SuQ Ouants not 

The Looden Machinery Co. of Canada, 

LtMITCO 

HEAD OFFICE) ^ Crimes Street, Cuelph, Ont. 



^*0|, rV^'^X^^-s^. ^^^^ 



Get Your Share of the Business 

Business is either good or bad according to 'the 
percentage you get of the possible trade in yovir com- 
munity. If your competitor lands the bulk of the 
trade, business is bad, if you get it, business is good. 

Good business is not luck. It is created by quality, 
service and advertising— advertising that is done by 
manufacturers and distributors, backing up your local 
efforts. This assistance is a big factor in determining 
the success or failure of lines you handle — ^it tips the 
scales in favor of good business. 

Dealers handling lines well advertised in" the Nor* - 
West Farmer are assured of sales-producing support. 
Grain cleaning and treating machinery and bam 
equipment are good lines to feature ri^t now at a 
time when full advantage can be taken of the adver- 
tising appearing. Your customers will be favorably 
considering, among others, the lines shown on this page. 



Winnipeg 



TlieNormst 

Farmer 



Farm Joum&t 1/ 



Canada 




**»'">J'- D»I2SL ?^ Mock 




I tolrod «o rcmafcl.hoM 
Mr oanw is ^ -""CiM* 
My Post Officii' 
R. R. No. .... "**""^**~« 

jSvo tot a,3 ColS^''T?^ 



I 



- vi 

I 

^11 



•«ffi 






WKITE FOB UXUStSATED dfiCUL. 

The New Wonder Manufach 




Erety >;tt«m «l wntOatioa <Ii>I»n<1« for its eCQclenoi on the Uiocouglm«s« wltli whi 
ol >lr U remowJ aii4 treib air brought Into it. plict Tb« motive power on wWch oO 
stems depend (of a eooUntMMU opward current In the loul air flues, li a ilUIerence In te 



The Townsiey Manufacturing Co. 

MANITOBA 



BRAf 




Canadian VecXoryt 
416 CORYOON AVE^ WINNITCG 



American Factor^t 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



'EMOE" GRAIN GRADEE AND SEPARATOR 

Bnlb the patented open and hi&r\k Aleves tb»t [>oaitiv*ly separate 
even? Wildcat &ecd, causing tbeio to lie flal and not up m ccd 

CUSHMAK MOTOR WORKS OP CANADA, LTD. 

Dept. a WHTTE AVSKUS AND V1»E ST., WDnJIREO, Km. 



VOL. XVII., No. 3 


WINNIPEG, CANADA, MARCH, 1921 


SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN CANADa{ f ^'y, f^ '* „^ 





Lower Yields and 

Soil Enrichment 

The lower yield in crops on the older farms in 
the West proves the need of enriching the soil. 
Western agricultural colleges advocate it. If 
you want to improve your land and get bigger 
crops, talk oyer your problems with our local 
branch manager. 

As the pioneer Bank of Western Canada we 
are bankers for the United Grain Growers, 
the United Farmers of Alberta and the Sas- 
katchewan Co-Operative Elevator Company. 452 

UNION BANK OF CANADA 



Head Office 



WINNIPEG 



YOU CAN ?:Jr 

Fire Premmms 50% 

Our Hardware Companies have returned 60% of the premium 
paid (based on board rates) to United States Hardware and Imple- 
ment policy holders since 1908. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK, MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life Bldg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 
IHSURANCE IN FORCE OVEK $264,000,000.00 

NET CASH SURPLUS ....... OVER $ 1,800,000.00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOMINION OF CANADA - - - - - $ ISO, 000. 00 

REFERENCE: BANK OF MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 



Sell WATSON'S HARROWS 




WATSON'S BOSS WOOD HARROWS 

These Harrows are made of seasoned hardwood. Each tooth securely set by two 
rivets. Fitted with malleable draw clevis. They are harrows of correct design. 
Have exclusive features. Easy sellers. Sizes: 78 Tooth, 14 feet; 102 Tooth, 
17 feet; 150 Tooth, 24 feet; 174 Tooth, 30 feet; 222 Tooth, 38 feet. Consider no 
statement that you can get harrows "just as good" as Watson's. There is but 
one Watson. Order it from us. 

WATSON'S All-Steel Diamond Harrows. Made in two weights: 35 and 50 pounds 
per section. Interchangeable on any diamond harrow draw-bar. The best imple- 
ment made for cultivating soil around growing grain. Ask for prices. 




Genuine Moline 
" ACME " Shares 

The original soft csntre 
share. Give perfect 
wear. Order your 
stock now. 

Repairs for "Monitor" Drills, Moline Plows and 

Moline Disk Harrows— Mandt Wagons and Farm Trucks — National and Mandt 
Manure Spreaders— Moline Engine Gangs — Adriance Binders, Mowers and Rakes. 



Also Repairs For 

Janesville Plows, 
Disc Harrows, etc. 

SEND us YOUR 
REPAIR ORDERS 




311 CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



Ronald-Smith Cultivators 




The Best Cultivator on this Continent 



IT GIVES UNIFORM CULTIVATION— This means a better seed bed. 
IT WILL NOT CLOG— Just think of it. 

IT HAS A SHEAR THAT WILL DO THE WORK— And a little more. 
It has a frog to support the shear wing with quantity and quality of material that 
enables us to guarantee that it will stand up to the work you put it at and do that 
work with ease. 

Agencie* open for thit machine — Write before it i* too late. 

Western Implements Limited 

6TH AVE. & SCAETH ST. - - - REGINA, SASK. 



WITHIN 



the last few years the business world seems to have discovered that 
Life Insurance can be made just as useful in the protection of busi- 
ness as in protecting the home.. 

The Great-West Life is writing a very large "Commercial" Business. 

Such business is in itself a strong endorsement. It involves the 
strictest scrutiny — the most careful weighing of policy conditions. 

For THE BEST available in Life Insurance, corporations and individ- 
uals can find no policies to equal those of 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

DEPT. " P 16 " 
HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



IMPLEMENT DEALERS 



Plan to Lead in the Fight for New Business 




FARM ENGINES 
Tips for 1921 




THE 1921 Battle for Bigger Business is 
like all other battles in at least this 
respect— a good plan is more than half 
of it. Hard work is the remainder. 

Lay out a definite plan for using Jumbo 
Farm Engines to help you get profitable 
business. Go to see every one of your 
present customers. Farmers owning one 
engine can be shown many ways in which 
they could profitably use another. Our list 
of Jumbo farm jobs will help you on this. 
Get expressions from these owners to use 
on the non-owners. Then, too, you can 
push your sales of Jumbo feed mills, pump 
jacks, etc., along with Jumbo engines. Make 
it a point to see prospects regularly. You 
will be surprised at your increased sales. 

Maintain a good service department. Jumbo 
Engines do not often need repairs, but cus- 
tomers* lack of experience sometimes makes 
trouble. A splendid business tian be built 
on your reputation for good service. Our 
Dealers' Salesmen Factory Training Trip 
will give you an expert engine man. 

Jumbo Engines have brought profitable business 
to dealers for twelve years. More than 115,000 
are in daily use. Get your share of the new busi- 
ness. Write for sales plan and full information. 




ers 



We also manufaclure 
a line of feed mills and 
pumf) jacks . 



NELSON BROTHERS COMPANY 



SAGINAW 



Also Makers of the Famous Line of Jumbo Motor Trucks 



MICHIGAN 



March, 192] 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3 





Help the Farmer Produce at Lower Cost 

THE best plan for Case Dealers to follow this year, we believe, is to 
sell Case Tractors on the basis of helping the farmer reduce his 
operating costs. Today the farmer is not particularly interested in 
increased production. What concerns him most right now, is to get more 
profit from such products as he may grow. He may not hope for higher 
prices this year, but he can produce at lower cost. 

Explain to farmers who have need for power farming equipment the 
labor-saving features of Case Kerosene Tractors ; the economy of kerosene 
operation; the long life and dependability assured by the excellence of 
Case design and construction. 

We co-operate with you in developing sales for Case Tractors and other 
Case Power Farming Machinery through liberal advertising in the most 
influential farm papers of the United States and Canada. 

Monthly we place before over five million farmers reasons vthy they 
should prefer Case Machinery. Let them know you are the Case dealer 
in their vicinity. 

Personal acquaintance with the prospect and a careful 
inspection of his farm will enable you to recommend the 
Case Tractor and tractor-drawn or driven machinery of the 
size best suited to that farmer's need. 

J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company 

Dept. C216 Racine, Wisconsin 





KEROSENE 



RACTORS 



NOTICE: W« want the public to 
know that our plow's and harrowa ar« 
not the Case plowa and harrt^* mod* 
bwtKe J. J. Ca*4 Plow Work* Co 



4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



Make Sure It's On the 
Threshing Machine You Sell! 




DEALERS who sell threshing machines 
throughout North America find that 
machines sell easier when equipped with 
The Grain-Saving Wind Stacker^ — and are 
increasingly harder to sell when not so 
equipped. Farmers and threshermen know 
that this stacker saves grain — adtual tests 
prove that the saving averages one to three 
per cent. Frequently this saving is sufficient to 
pay the entire threshing bill. 

The Grain-Saving Wind Stacker is not the 
ordinary wind stacker, butthe improvedwind 



stacker with the grain trap which puts in- 
to the SACK the grain and unthreshed 
heads that otherwise are wasted by the 
threshing machine — blown to the stack — 
due to faulty adjustments of sieves, im- 
proper regulation of blast, excessive speed 
variations, careless feeding, etc. 

The leading manufacturers of threshing 
machines in the United States and Canada 
have adopted this Stacker. Many supply it 
exclusively. Others can supply it if you de- 
mand it. Do so! Specify The Grain-Saving 
Wind Stacker, and accept no other! 



This trade-mark (in colors) is on eacK 
side of The Grain-Saving Wind Stack- 
er. It is the trade-nnark that farmers and 
threshermen know as identifying The 
Grain - Saving Wind Stacker — the 
Stacker which puts the grain in the 
sack and does not waste it in the straw 
stack. 



Grain-Saving Wind Stacker advertising is running this year in twenty-nine 
leading farm papers — reaching over three and one-half million readers. 

The Grain-Saving Wind Stacker originated with 
The Indiana Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis, U.S.A. 




Wind 
lacker 



COCRSHUTT 

IMPROVED WONDER 
GRAIN CLEANER 




SELLING THE COCKSHUTT LINE 

Gives you a full line of implements for every sea- 
son of the year. There need be no off seasons in your 
sales efforts. Cockshutt machines and implements 
are of the highest qualiy and are backed by an 
aggressive advertising policy and dealer service which 
makes profitable business for the dealer. 



r^VERY farmer needs one — be ready to supply 
the demand in your locality. There is nothing 
better than the Improved Wonder on the Market, 

It*s a separator, a cleaner and a grader all in one. 

Has many features that are easily demonstrated 

and readily convince prospective customers of its 

superiority. 

Is adaptable to all classes of work and can be 
supplied with or without bagger. 

Get in touch with our nearest Branch House to-day. 
There are stocks at each warehouse to draw on — and a 
service organization anxious to assist you. 



Cockshutt Plow Company Limited 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



Vol. XVII., No. 3 



WINNIPEG. CANADA. MARCH, 1921 



Subscription Prick in Canada { Copy-'lOe* 



Western Canada Automotive Equipment Show 

Splendid Display of Car, Tractor and Track Equipment 



The Western Canada Automotive 
Equipment Show, held in Winnipeg from 
February 15th to 19th, the second week 
of the bonsi)iel, was a remarkable suc- 
cess from viewpoint of attendance and 
the variety of equipment and accessories 
shown. The exhibits on view in the 
large convention hall of the Board of 
I'rade Buildhig were estimated as being 
worth nearly .$250,000. Well over 40,000 
persons attended the show during the 
week, and the firms making displays 
rejiort many sales to visitors, and they 
lined up a great number of live pros- 
pects for spring business. 

There were 71 booths occupied, the 
capacity of the hall being taxed to the 
uttermost. Every conceivable knid of 
accessory or specialty 
in equipment was on 
\icvf — lines which are 
i)f direct interest to the 
car or tractor owner, 
and also a vast variety 
I if garage equipment 
which showed the gar- 
age man how he could 
reduce his labor cost in 
ptl'ecting repairs. 

This exposition was 
tlie first show of the 
kind to be held in Can- 
ada, and it is expected 
that a show on a much 
larger scale will be held 
auring 1!)22. The ex- 
liibition was officiallj' 
iipened on the evening 
of the 1.5th by Sir J. 
A. M. Aikins, Lieut. - 
• iovernor. Many of the 
manufacturers' and 
jiibbers' representatives 
wlio were present had 
come from the big cir- 
cuit of winter automo- 
l)ile and accessory shows 
in Eastern Canada and 
the U.S., "and all of them claimed that 
the Winnipeg exhibition was up to the 
standard of the best exhibition of the 
kind they had attended and better than 
most similar expositions. Concerns 
from all over Canada and from the 
United States had displays at the show. 
A feature that struck the visitor was 
tlie large number of similar brands of 
accessories which were handled by more 
tlian one jobber. 

Music supplied by a splendid orchestra 
in livened the show with frequent selec- 
tions. The hall was very tastefully 
ilecorated. and the attendance seemed 
to be made up largely of car owners or 
tliose who contemplate buying cars in 
the near future, if one may gauge by 
I lie keen interest shown in the lines ex- 
hibited. This was not an automobile 
exhibition, for not a single car was 
-liown, merely accessories and equip- 
ment for car, truck and tractor. 

Since the first automobile came into 
use in Western Canada in 190.3, there 
has been paid into the federal treasury, 
in the shape of import duties on auto- 
mobiles for the western division, a sum 
of over $97,0100,000 and a further sum 
of over 122,000,000 on automobile acces 
sories, such as tires, spare parts, re- 
pairs, spark plugs, electrical supplies, 



etc., or a grand total of over $119,000,- 
OOO. Tliese figui-es are only inclusive of 
the period of 190.3 and the end of the 
fiscal year of 1918. 

Exhibitors and the Lines They Displayed 

A. Eobataille, Deloraine, showed his 
line of Lawrence all-round polish for 
automobile finish, f urnitur e and metal 
work. 

The Globe Supply Corporation, of 
Abingdon , 111., makers of Protexells, 
showed their process of sewing trade 
marks and car names on the backs of 
overalls for advertising purposes. 

Canada Dry Cells, Winnipeg, had a 
very attractive display of their North 
Star batteries of the multiple water- 
proof type, also showed cases of flasli- 



lines of motor carbon remover, British 
made grease cups, hose clamps, shellac, 
cements and metal polishes. The Stan- 
dard Machine Works had some fine 
samples of re-bored cylinders, as done 
in their shops, also ground-finished 
crankshafts and other samples of grind- 
ing work which they specialize in. 

Peters & Herron, (Booth 52) of Win- 
nipeg, displayed a line of their tire 
covers, top covering materials and com- 
plete seat covers. 

Edward White & Co._, Minneapolis and 
Winnipeg, had on view Milwaukee tires, 
Ford and Chevrolet parts, Bethlehem 
spark plugs, Jensen lever pumps, valve 
lifters, Niehoflf magneto charging equip- 
ment, Corcoran-Victor laijjps for tractor 




General View of the Western Canada Automotive Equipment Show, held in the Board of 
Building, Winnipeg, February isth to 19th. Everything from Washers to Garage Cranes was 



lights, torches, etc., showing the adap- 
tation of their smaller cells. 

The Canadian National Carbon Co., 
Toronto, and the Prest-o-Lite Co. of 
Canada had a composite display in 
Booth 56. A very complete display of 
Columbia dry batteries was shown, also 
Prest-o-Lite welding equipment, com- 
prising torches, regulators and gauges, 
gas cylinders, etc. Especially interesting 
was the new cast iron cutting torch 
shown by the Prest-o-Lite company. 
Welding rods and fluxes, brazing torches, 
storage batteries, volt meters, stabber- 
sets and test cells, hydrometers, etc., 
completed a very interesting exhibit. 
Cylinders for car lighting were shown 
in various sizes. 

W. Bruce Campbell, Winnipeg, showed 
a line of Fordson tractor lighting sys- 
tems, Ford reamers, tire chains and a 
line of top and upholstery dressing. In 
addition this firm showed National Stan- 
dard jacks, "More Room" steering 
wheels, auto locks, polishes and valve 
grinding compounds. 

The Porcupine Sales Corporation Ltd., 
Winnipeg, had on view a line of their 
Porcupine tire boots for fixing blowouts. 

W. M. Gordon & Co. and the Standard 
Machine Works of Winnipeg, shared 
Booth 53. The Gordon company showed 



and truck use, hydrometers, Akron-Turk 
garage equipment and Antex reels, as 
made by the Cincinnati "Specialty Co. 

W. L. Renton & Co., Hamilton, Ont., 
Booth 50, showed a line of Hassler 
shock absorbers for cars and trucks, 
Security auto theft signals and Cowles 
door locking handles. This company 
state that they will open up in Winni- 
peg. W. L. Renton was in charge of 
the exhibit. 

Ronald J. J. Muir, Winnipeg, displayed 
a line of the Master carburetor, suitable 
for any make of car, tmck or tractor. 

Richards -Wilcox Canadian Co., London, 
Ont., in Booth 65, had on display a 
line of their "H & D" shock absorbers. 
Mai-quette tire tools, tire savers and 
storage jacks, Perfection car heaters and 
a line of bumpers. A very interesting 
part of this exhibit was a testing stand, 
showing how the H & D shock absorber 
saves the car in going over rough roads, 
action being got by the wheels of a rear 
axle operating against large cam wheels 
operating below them. R. F. Warren 
and W. A. Torney were in charge. 

The J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co.. 
Winnipeg, had a very complete line of 
their accessories on display in Booths 
63 and 64. They displayed K & S tires, 
auto springs, K/B bumpers, Perfex and 



McKinnon radiators, complete Fidelity 
welding outfits with torches, regulators, 
etc., Butterfield tap and die sets, Kyanize 
motor car enamels, Weaver garage equip- 
ment. Champion spark plugs, Sunderland 
pumps, Burd and Inland piston rings, 
automatic grease guns, Krauter pliers, 
Halliday shock absorbers, Weed tire 
chains, Bourney wrenches. Walker jacks, 
Pyrene fire extinguishers. Lane jacks, 
and a display of Veedol oils. 

J. R. May & Co., Winnipeg, Booth 62, 
showed a full line of their new and 
rebuilt "Maybilt" radiators, a make to 
suit any size of car truck or tractor. 
Those radiators, say the company, are 
guaranteed frost proof and are made 
m Winnipeg . from Canadian copper. J. 

K. May was in charge 
of this interesting 
exhibit. 

The .J. & B. Manu- 
facturing Co., of Pitts - 
field, Mass., had on 
view a line of then- 
replacement c o i 1 
switch keys for Ford 
cars, rocker ■ arm lift- 
ers and cage removers 
and wheel pullers. 

Burgess Batteries 
Ltd, 701 Wellington 
Ave., Winnipeg, head 
office iladison, Wis., 
showed their flashlight 
batteries, L'niplex igni- 
tion batteries and a 
stand showing the 
waterproof construc- 
tion of their product. 
They also showed bal- 
tery outfits for wire- 
less use. Seven exhi- 
bitors in the hall had 
Burgess batteries as 
part of their display. 

Lion's Auto Garage, 
Winnipeig, showed a 
very complete line of starting and 
ignition systems including the following 
types: Westinghouse, Delco, Remy and 
Atwater-Kent. They also showed a line 
of Klaxon horns and repair parts for 
many diff'erent ignition systems, as used 
on the car and tractor. 

W. H. Hodgson & Co., Swift Current, 
had on view several types of their vul- 
canizers and buffers — very practical and . 
eflicient equipment. 

A. Strong, Winnipeg, showed a line of 
Ford parts. Duplex timers, motor locks 
and wrench sets of various makes. Jfi 
addition they displayed valve grinders, 
batter}^ repair tools and valve tappet 
silencers. 

Robinson & Webber, Winnipeg, had on 
view a line of speed wrenches for con- 
necting rods, Westad electric heaters and 
Polar-Liquid anti-freeze. 

Hercules Bumpers Limited, Spadina 
Ave., Toronto, showed their one piece 
•'I" beam steel bumpers for all makes 
of cars. This line was shown in five 
styles, the bumper being attached to the 
car by universal patent brackets. They 
are guaranteed non-breakable, being 
made from .75 carbon steel. Light types 
were sho^vn for Ford, Qievrolet and 
other light-weight ears. They are very 
simply attached, and the same bar is 



Trade 
shown 



G 



Canadian FarmBImplements 



March, 1921 



adaptable to either front or roai- of car. 
This display attracted much attention 
and \vas in charge of E. H. Bate, man- 
ager of the company. 

Moncrieff & Endress, Winnipeg, showed 
a line of their plumbers' and steam- 
fitter's brass goods, brass and iron 
valves, porcelain godds, waste, asbestos 
packings, gauge glasses, oil cup glasses, 
steam gauges, curtain lights, auto trim- 
mings, bow sockets, mirrors, valves, 
steering wheels and Kant-Freeze radi- 
ator solution. 

The General Asbestos and Rubber Co., 
of Charleston, S.D., showed a line of 
their "Garco" brake lining, comprising 
a complete variety of all size gaskets 
and packings for auto use in a variety 
of types. 0. C. Wynne, of the Chicago 
office, was in charge 

Goo & Patrick Ltd., Jarvis Ave., Tor- 
onto, had a very attractive showing of 
their Bull Dog truck chain, an electric 
welded chain for truck use tha.t is 
attached in imits with the minimum 
amount of time. The individual units 
clip onto a special spring centre that 
lies over the hub, the units clamping 
into their own links. The chain is made 
of .32 carbon steel and is of heavy 
section. W. D. Goo, president of the 
company was in charge of the exhibit. 

The Pyrene Manfg. Co., Winnipeg, 
showed a full line of their fire ex- 
tinguishers in all sizes, also lenses and 
Pyrene refiller liquid. 

North Star Anti-Freeze Co., Winnipeg, 
showed a line of their ' anti-freeze solu- 
tion made with glycerine and alcohol 
base, also their line of Shapiro lubricat- 
ing oils for general use. 

The B. & M. Rubber Co., 221 Naussau 
St., Winnipeg, displayed their line of 
"Maxotires", an inside casing that takes 
the pressure off and lets the tire wear 
out. 

The Canadian Raybestos Co. Ltd., of 
Peterborough, Ont., had on view a very 
complete and attractive showing of their 
Raybestos brake lining. Ford transmis- 
sion lining and Ford special brake lining. 
Types of lining and gaskets were shown 
for car, truck and tractor use. 

T>. Ackland & Son Ltd., Winnipeg, 
had a most attractive and complete 
showing of their accessory lines in 
Booths 35-36. They displayed Manly 
garage equipment, cranes, engine stands, 
presses, etc. Guelph springs for all 
types of car. Royal Oak tires, both cord 
and fabric types in all sizes. Univer- 
_8al batteries for all cars and a full line 
"of battery parts. Other lines showed 
were: Little Giant tire rim tools, 
Billmont speed wrench sets, Master, tool 
kits. Black Hawk and Waldon wrench 
sets, Mosler spark plugs for cars, trac- 
tors and trucks. Lodge plugs and Cham- 
pion plugs; Turner gas welding and cut- 
ting equipment and Turner carbon burn- 
ing outfits; Hi-Lo cantilever, 2V2-ton 
lift jacTcs, Sturdy air chucks. Sturdy 
replacement coils for all types of igni- 
tion, "Snap-across" chains, Dreadnaught 
unit system truck and car tire chains, 
Marquette tire tools. Messenger wire 
wheels for F.ords, Swift Current vul- 
canizing equipment. Universal piston 
lapping tools,' Kellogg engine driven 
pumps, Tanco tire pumps, McKinnon 
radiators for Fordson tractors,' Perfecto 
radiators, Peerless radiators, Burgess 
batteries for ignition and lighting pur- 
poses. In addition, a line of Ford and 
Chevrolet parts were shown, also stan- 
dard and oversize pistons for all cars; 
Porcupine tire boots, Norwesco radiator 
cement and liquids, brake and clutch 
compounds ,Burd piston rings, a full 
line of drills, presses, forges and forge 
tools; top materials, bevel plate glass 
cover lights, fender straighteners ; Lane 
jacks, connecting rod wrenches, etc. 
This exhibit was in charge of R. P. 
Ackland, manager of the accessory de- 
partment, H. E. Moore and R. L. 
McNaughton. 

Canadian Perfect Wheels Ltd., Lis- 
towel, Ont., showed a full line of their 
wire wheels and jacks, of the "Innova- 
tion" pattern. They also displayed 
their Peirf ection shock absorbers and 
.bumpers and discs for Ford wheels. 
C. M. Kolbenstetter, secretary, was in 
charge of the exhibit. 



The Champion Spark Plug Co. of 
Canada, Windsor, Ont., showed a very 
attractive display of their plugs for car, 
truck and tractor use, also their display 
cases and merchandisers for dealers' 
stores. A. J. Hayes, of the Windsor 
office, was in charge of the exhibit. 

The Miller-Morse Hardware Co., Win- 
nipeg, had a very complete display of 
their lines in Booths 39-40. They showed 
Reflex spark plugs, Dunlop tires in all 
sizes, Duplex timers, Howe lights, spot 
lights, Rie-Nie fan belts, radiator ce- 
ments, valve grinding compound, rubber 
and fabric patches; Halliday shock 
absorbers, Boyce motometers, Adelite 
carbon remover, Flo-Glaze auto finishes, 
North Star and Burgess batteries, etc. 

The Weaver Manufacturing Co., of 
Springfield, 111., showed a very complete 
line of their garage equipment which 
attracted much attention. This com- 
prised wheel repair stands, axle stands, 
jacks, twin jacks, tire spreaders, univer- 
sal tire changers, aiito hoists, garage 
presses, puller clamps, rear axle attach- 
ments, bucket jjumps for soft greases 
and engine oils, auto oilers, towing poles 
and auto ambulances and body extension 
equipment. A very interesting feature 
in this display was the Weaver align- 
ment indicator which automatically in- 
dicates the alignment of front or rear 
wheels by simply running the wheel over 
a roller bearing plate. Hands on a dial 
indicate to the fraction of an inch how 
much the wheels are toed in or out. 

P. A. C. Mclntyre Co. Ltd., Winnipeg, 
manufacturer's agents, who distribute 
Weaver equipment in Western Canada, 
showed the Universal cylinder reboring 
tool and also the Perfex radiator for 
Ford cars. P. A. C. Mclntyre was in 
charge of the<>exhibit. 

The Globelite Battery Co. Ltd., Win- 
nipeg, showed their Made-in-Winnipeg 
line of batteries for lighting and igni- 
tion purposes. Farm lighting plant 
batteries were shown from 32 to 110- 
volt capacities. This company makes 
batteries for all types of cars. W. D. 
Kellogg 'was in charge of the exhibit. 

Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd., 
Winnipeg, had on view a line of Gill 
piston rings, Kingston carburetors and 
K — W magnetos for tractor use. They 
also showed Kargo compound for trans- 
missions and differentials, and connec- 
tions for ignition systems. U.S.L. bat- 
teries, A.C. and Goliath spark plugs for 
ear and tractor, Tungar battery chargers 
and several other lines were shown by 
this firm. C. Whitman was in charge 
of an interesting exhibit. 

Wood Vallance Limited, Winnipeg, 
showed their Phillips gas pumps, Fire- 
stone tires, Miehelin tires. Titanic 
springs, Raybestos brake lining, Colum- 
bia and Hart storage batteries. North 
Star batteries, Fidelity welding equip- 
ment, Gemco bumpers. Walker jacks. 
Weaver garage equipment, A. C, Her- 
cules and Splitdorf spai-k plugs; Perfex 
radiators, Waldon wrenches, Splitdorf 
magnetos, Atwater-Kent ignition sys- 
tems, Tuthill springs, Howe searchlights. 
Ever-ready flashlights, Rayfield carbur- 
etors, Burd piston rings, Phelps wire 
wheels, Boyce moto-meters. Sun-ray 
lenses, etc., etc. D. A. Ferguson was 
in charge of a very interesting exhibit. 

The British American Oil Co., Winni- 
peg, successors to the Winnipeg Oil Co., 
showed their Woco transmission grease 
and the Saybolt viscosmeter for testing 
the viscosity of oils. They also dis- 
played a full line of auto and tractor 
oil greases and dopes, gasoline and anti- 
freeze, cup greases, axle greases, etc. 
W. E. Dolan, G. E. Harrison and H. H. 
Burke were in charge of the exhibit. 

The Northern Electric Co., of Montreal 
and Winnipeg, showed a full line of their 
Titan storage batteries Wotten charging 
outfits, Electric measuring instruments 
of all types, Black and Decker electric 
drills, and the full line of wires and 
cables as manufactured by their fac- 
tories. Ambu battery-room equipment, 
as made by the American Bureau of 
Engineering, was an interesting part of 
this attractive exhibit. M. E. Deering 
was in charge. 

J. B. Lawrence & Co., Winnipeg, 
showed a line of Ford replacement parts, 



Edelman battery testers, gi-ease cups, 
Bourney tools, Sunderland tire pumps, 
lenses, etc. A. B. Lawrence was in 
charge. 

Cadillac Motor Sales Co. showed a full 
line of Mack batteries, Buckeye shock 
absorbers and Cosmo hand cleaning com- 
pound. 

The Manufacturers Car Service Co., 
Montreal, showed Black and Decker elec- 
tric drills, Billmont wrenches, Onan 
electric testing equipment, cylinder lap- 
ping equipment and Locktite patches. 

Marshall Wells Co. Ltd., Winnipeg, 
showed a line of Weaver garage equip- 
ment, Partridge tires. Klaxon horns. 
Leak-proof piston rings, PDQ pumps 
and Higgins springs. They also dis- 
played their line of Sunco motor oils 
and greases as made by the Sun Co., 
of Philadelphia, and Columbia storage 
batteries in a variety of sizes. Curtis 
air compressors, garage tools, Zenith 
mechanic tools, A.C, Splitdorf and 
Champion spark plugs, Corcoran -Victor 
tractor headlights, jacks, vulcanizing 
equipment, radiator cores, garage show 
cases, battery testers, etc., completed 
a very nice display in charge of D. 
Livingstone. 

The NcH-th Star Oil and Refining Co., 
Winnipeg, showed their William Penn 
motor oils, French auto oils. Royal and 
Tractor hard oils, French transmission 
greases. Red Star gasiolinje. Keystone 
coal oils, etc. 

The Great West Saddlery Co., Winni- 
peg, had on display their Great West 
tires, Gould batteries. Tungsten plugs. 
Champion plugs, Burge.ss batteries, Mes- 
senger wire wheels, Burd piston rings. 
Weaver garage equipment. Champion 
blowers and forges, Howe and Edelman 
lights, Pumps, Bourney tools. Black 
Hawk wrenches, Butterfield sets, Hoyt 
electric instruments, weed chains, re- 
boring tools, Perfex radiators, etc. 

S. F. Bowser & Co., 469 Inkster Ave., 
Winnipeg, showed their 5, 1 and Vz- 
gallon gasoline pumps, also a complete 
line of lubricating oils and compounds. 
A 230-gallon tank, as manufactured by 
this' concern, was also on display, and 
a line of flexible hose for garage and 
dealer use. T. H. Rhodes, manager at 
Winnipeg, was in charge. 

Prescott W. Robinson Sales Co. Ltd., 
Montreal, showed Mossberg socket wren- 
ches, Shaler vulcanizing equipment, road 
lights, piston rings in a variety of sizes, 
and pressed steel wheels for truck use. 
They alW displayed a line of their 3 in 
1 fine oil for magnetos and timers. P. 
W. Robinson, manager, was in charge 
of the exhibit. 

The Oak Tire & Rubber Co., Toronto, 
showed a very complete line of their 
Oak tires, fabric and cord, in all sizes, 
and tubes in both red and grey finish. 
W. Brennan was in' charge. 

Imperial Oil Limited, Winnipeg, in an 
attractive booth had a display of their 
Imperial Polarine in different grades, 
Gargoj^le and Mobiloils and all styles of 
Gilbert and Barker tanks and self- 
measuring pumps. A large map showed 
the wide-spread agency system of the 
company, displaying the location of 
agencies from coast to coast in the 
Dominion. 

The Burd Ring Sales Co. Ltd., Winni- 
peg, showed a full line of their Bur(| 
high -compression and quick-seating rings 
in all sizes, which are handled by all 
leading jobbers in the Canadian West. 
This concern handle 650 sizes of both 
types of ring, and have types for tractor, 
ear, truck and stationary engine adap- 
tation. They also showed special rings 
for airplane engines. Tihey also dis- 
played the Hoyt line of electric instru- 
ments, dashboard voltmeters, garage 
. testing sets, etc. Violet ray lenses were 
an interesting part of this display and 
the Hall-Thompson line of "Wonder- 
worker" top dressing. J. H. Dixon and 
E. W. Cadman, of the Winnipeg branch 
of the Burd organization, were in charge. 
M. Batcheldor, engineer of the Burd 
High Compression Ring Co., and Mr. 
Perez, technician of the Hoyt Electrical 
Instrument Co., were present during the 
week. 

The Tuthill Spring Co., Chicago, 



showed a full line of their Titanic 
springs, a type with a "hump" centre, 
which are guaranteed against centre 
breakage. They were shown in sizes 
for all popular cars. H. H. Osborne, of 
the Chicago office, was in charge of the 
exhibit. 

Joe St. Mars, Winnipeg, Tuthill dis- 
tributor, showed a line of Walker jacks, 
Boyce moto-meters, metal specialists. 
Inland piston rings, Veedol oils, Albert- 
son-Sioux tools, Waldon wrenches and 
radiators. Mr. St. Mars was in charge. 

Canadian Oil Companies Ltd., Winni- 
peg, showed their line of En-arco motor 
oils and greases, and White Rose gaso- 
line for car, truck and tractor use. 

The Acme Magneto and Electrical Co., 
Winnipeg, had on view a very inter- 
esting display of garage testing equip- 
ment for magnetos. Their generator 
testers and brake testers for starting 
equipment attracted much attention, as 
these machines enable the garage man 
to locate electrical troubles with the 
minimum loss of time. They test all 
makes of generators and also give an 
H.P. test. A K-W magneto which ran 
without any connection during the entire 
duration of the snow, was a feature 
that puzzled many electrical experts. 
This company handle and carry all re- 
pairs for such lines as Gray-Davis start- 
ing systems, and Berling Splitdorf, 
Bosch, Dixie, K-W, Sumter and Webster 
magnetos. B. G. Jones, chief engineer 
and G. R. Cormack, sales manager, were 
in charge of a vei-y interesting exhibit. 

Manley Manufacturing Co., York, Pa., 
showed their line of cranes. Ford engine 
stands, portable work benches, garage 
presses, bench motor supports, tools, etc. 

A. H. Eraser & Co., Winnipeg, showed 
their line of Mosler spark plugs for car 
and tractor use. Lane auto jacks, 
"Quality" springs, standard engine sup- 
ports, Blublaze timers, Eagle garage 
tools. Black Hawk wrench sets, electri- 
cal instruments, M.S.L. Air-Tite plun- 
gers. Universal charging coils, Howell 
pumps, etc. 

Russell R. Sutherland, Winnipeg rep- 
resentative for Motor Sundries Corp., 
of Toronto, showed Mayall flat spring 
bumpers, Floto-Ford shock absorbers, 
Mayall motor heaters, steerwarms, pump 
plungers, John Morrow twist drills and 
Ingersoll files, re-boring equipment, etc. 

Motor Products Ltd., Winnipeg, dis- 
played a line of WiUard storage bat- 
teries. Imperial gas welding equipment, 
torches, tanks, etc. They also showed 
Guarantee Visible pumps, Goodell-Pratt 
and Wilt twist drills, and Gabriel snub- 
bers; Champion drills and forges, bat- 
tery testing equipment and Atwater- 
Kent ignition systems completed a very 
nice display. 

S. C. Jdhnson & Son Ltd., Brantford, 
Ont., showed their lines of cleaners, 
carbon removers, oils, top dressing, auto- 
lac, radiator cement and hasty patches. 
H. J. Croft and A. L. D. Colquhoun were 
in charge of the booth. 

F. C. Young & Co. Ltd., Winnipeg, 
displayed a line of Exide batteries in 
all sizes for lighting and starting sys- 
tems, also a full line of battery repairs. 
They also showed Goodyear and Domin- 
ion tires. F. J. Wilson was in charge. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 
Winnipeg, had a very complete showing 
of their accessory lines on view. They 
displayed a Ford burning in and testing 
machines, bat-o-meters, Onan generator 
testing equipment, Hart-Bell tire pumps, 
Henry-Cooper re-boring and re-babbit- 
ting tools, Dixie rear axle assembly 
stands. Ford Rotary motor stands. Im- 
perial welding equipment, wrench sets, 
vulcanizers, Columbia storage batteries. 
Lodge plugs, auto jacks, Inland piston 
rings, Raybestos, brake lining. Weed 
chains, Sioux valve facing tools, Scheb- 
ler carburetors, Hoyt meters, Rapid- 
Dayton gas purrips, Anderson lights, etc. 
W. B. Hammond, J. R. Cruickshanks and 
J. Walker were in charge. 

Mutual Oils Ltd., Winnipeg, showed 
their line of Pendol motor oils and 
greases, also Crown tractor oil and All- 
in-One gas intensifier. W. K. Reimer, 
W. Vivian and J. M. Ness were in 
attendance at the exhibit. 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 



Proving 
OilPull Power 

After 8 years of hard plow- 
ing, threshing and road 
work, my OilPull is in 
such good shape that I 
'would not trade it "even 
up" today for a new trac- 
tor of any other make. It 
always has more power 
than I need, even on the 
toughest Jobs. It has 
given no trouble and I am 
positive it will easily last 
15 years more. 

H. L. Miller, 
Cannon Falls, Minn. 

I am using my OilPull 
tractor with a Jumbo 
plow, breaking through 
heavy scrub with ease, ten 
or twelve inches deep and 
doing the best work that 
has been done in this set- 
tlement. 

The land is now ready for 
the drill and if we have an 
average crop the tractor 
will have practically paid 
for itself in one season's 
work, 

George Cooke, 
Waldron, Sask. 



Howmuch Power do%u 
Demand in aTractor ? 

The investment your customers make in a tractor is chiefly to se- 
cure increased power on their farms. 

Power is the big demand — the power to plow more and deeper 
and faster— power to operate thresher, sheller, silo filler, etc.— 
power that saves horses, relieves help, speeds up the whole pro- 
gram of farm work — power that decreases production costs and 
increases farm profits. 

And it is the great power and great reserve of powder that enables 
the OilPull to do all ordinary farming jobs with ease and constant 
dependability. And, in addition, to be fully equal to the extraor- 
dinary jobs — to work over hills, to operate steadily in toughest 
sod, to thresh tough, wet grain. 

Indeed, it is largely its great power— its ability to perform the hard 
jobs easily— that accounts for the unequaled length of life for 
which the OilPull is famous. 

To all this is added an unequaled record of economy that makes 
the OilPull cheapest in cost per year of service, despite the 
mere selling price of any tractor. 

It is guaranteed to burn kerosene under all conditions. It is oil 
cooled. Two distinct lubricating systems — mechanical and splash 
— operating simultaneously, insure positive lubrication. 

This is the kind of tractor your customers are demanding — one 
with proved power, dependability, long life and economy. The 
tractor you handle should possess them in full measure. 

Have you ever investigated the opportunity offered by an Advance- 
Rumely dealership? You should — today. 

ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER COMPANY, Inc. 
Calgary. Alta. LaPorte, Indiana . Reelna.Sask. 
6«alcatoon,Sask. ' Winnipeg. 

•18 Aben Street. Toronto. Ont. 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



The U.S. National Tractor Show 



The Sixth National Tractor 
Show in the United States, held 
in the Ohio Sta'te Fair Grounds, 
Columbus, Ohio, February 7th to 
12th, was conceded to be the best 
show and educational exposition 
of the kind ever staged in Amer- 
ica. Great crowds of tractor deal- 
ers and distributors attended and 
farmers were very much in evi- 
dence looking- over 'the latest 
types of tractors and tractor ma- 
chinery on the market. 

A splendid lecture program 
had been arranged, at which ex- 
perts spoke on topical subjects 
such as: Adapting the Farm to 
Power; The Type and Size of 
Tractor to Buy ; Ignition Troub- 
les; What is Tractor Service; 
Tractor Tools; The Trend of 
Tractor Design. Four farmers 
co-operated in an address on, 
"What the Tractor has done for 
Me." 

Following are some of the lead- 
ing tractor concerns who staged 
displays at the show, at which 
over 200 companies displayed 
their lines : 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
La Porte, Ind. ; Allis-Chalmers 
Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. ; Ault- 
man & Taylor Machinery Co., 
Mansfield, Ohio ; Avery Com- 



pany, Peoria, 111. ; Beeman Trac- 
tor Co., Minneapolis ; Bates S'teel 
Mule Co., Lorain, O. ; Boring- 
Tractor Corp., Rockford, 111.; 
Case Plow Works Co., J. I., 



Parr Co., Charles City, Iowa ; 
Holt Manufacturing Co., Peoria, 
111.; Huber Manufacturing Co., 
Marion, Ohio ; International Har- 
vester Co., Columbus, Ohio ; La 
Crosse Tractor Co., La Crosse, 
Wis. ; Lauson Mfg. Co., John, 
New Holstein, Wis. ; M o 1 i n e 




Display of Advance-Rumely Co. at the National Tractor Show. 



Indianapolis, Ind. ; Case Thresh- 
ing Machinery Co., J. I., Racine, - 
Wis. ; Cleveland Tractor Co., 
Cleveland, Ohio; Deere Plow Co., 
John, Columbus, Ohio ; Eagle 
Mfg. Co., Appleton, Wis. ; Elec- 
tric Wheel Co., Quincy, 111.; 
Emerson-Brantingham I m p 1 e - 
ment Co., Rockford, 111. ; Hart- 



MM 



ill 



mm 



of the bowl, 
and is then 
distributed 
evenly — entering 
at the bottom of every 
disc at the same time and then being forced 
UP through the discs to the proper outlets. 
The natural direction of all centrifugal force 
is upward. This is one of the reasons why 
the Viking skims to practically 100% perfect. 

But this is only one of the many great fea- 
tures of the Viking that makes it the easiest 
separator of them all for dealers to sell. Send 
for our dealer proposition and latest catalog No. 165 

SWEDISH SEPARATOR COMPANY 
'<14 Confederation Life Bldg. 



WINNIPEG 

Man. 



Plow Co., Moline, 111. ; Monarch 
Tractor Co., Watertown, Wis. ; 
Port Huron Engine & Thresher 
Co., Port Huron, Mich.; Rock 
Island Plow Co., Rock Island, 
111.; Russell & Co., Massillon, 
Ohio, Samson Tractor Co., Janes- 
ville. Wis. ; Twin. City Co., Min- 
neapolis. 

Motor trucks for farmers were 
exhibited by the following firms : 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
La Porte, Ind. ; Avery Company, 
Peoria^, 111. ; International Harves- 
ter Co., Columbus, Ohio; Moline 
Plow Co., Moline, 111. ; Twin City 
Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Implements and Threshers 

In this line the leading exhibi- 
tors included : Advance-Rumely, 
Aultman & Taylor, Avery Com- 
pany, Case Plow Works, Case 
T.M. Company, Deere Plow Co., 
Emerson-Brantingham, Huber 
Mfg. Co., International Harvester 
Co., Moline Plow Co., Oliver 
Chilled Plow Works, Rock Island 



PUMPS 



AND 

Clothes Reek 

Made -in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle pumps for 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys- 
tems. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(Established 1882) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS- PRICES 

Norlh-West Pump Co. 

T. N. WILLIAMSON W. J. MEBRELL 
Phone 607 

19-6th Street Brandon, Man. 




Plow Co., Roderick Lean Mfg. 
Co., Samson Tractor Co., Twin 
City Co., etc. 

Carburetors and ignition equip- 
ment were exhibited by such 
concerns as the : American Bosch 
Magneto Corp., Byrne Kingston 
& Co., Champion Ignition Co., 
Eiseman Magne'to Co., K-W Igni- 
tion Co., John Lauson Mfg. Co., 
A. R. Mosler Co., Splitdorf Elec- 
tric Co., Stromberg Motor De- 
vices Co., etc. 

Leading Exhibits 

The Advance-Rumely Thresher 
Co., La Porte, showed 1921 
models of the Rumely 12-20, 16- 
30, 20-40 and 30-60 tractors, 22x36 
and 32x52 Ideal grain separators, 
one Rumely truck chassis with 
standard equipment and one 
Rumely truck equipped with 
pneumatic tires, farm body, .short 
stakes, cattle racks and extension 
sides ,together with a sectional 

011- Pull engine, a sectional trans- 
mission, radiator and other parts. 

The AA^ery Co., Peoria, showed 
the complete line, comprising a 
6-cvlinder, Model C, the 8-16, 

12- 25, 12-20, 14-28, 18-36 and 
25-50 farm tractors, and the 45-65 
road tractor. Motor cultivators 
were also shown in a variety of 
sizes and the company's line of 
threshers, fully equipped. In the 
tillage-tool exhibit they showed 
the Avery 3-bo'ttom orchard plow, 
Avery three-disc plow, Sanders 
five-disc plow, Avery rigid beam, 
two-bottom plow, self-adjusting 
tractor disc harrow, power lift 
tractor grain drill and the new 
-A-very roller bearing equipped 
silo filler. The Avery motor 
truck also was shown. 

The J. I. Case Plow Works, 
Racine, showed a Wallis motor, 
a Wallis cutaway chassis, Wallis 
tractors, J. I. Case motor culti- 
vators. The AVallis models were 
shown with a variety of equip- 
ment. In the implement exhibit 
the company showed their tractor 
disc and moldboard plows, 'tan- 
dem disc harrows, listers, etc: 

The J. I. Case T.M. Co., Racine, 
showed Case tractors in 10-18, 
15-27, 22-40 and 40-72 sizes ; two, 
three and four-bottom Grand De- 
tour moldboard plows ; Grand 
Detour disc plow. Grand Detour 
disc harrow. Case thresher, hay 
baler and silo filler. In addition 
there was a "live" or working 
model two-bottom orchard plow, 
a cut-out nickel-plated, * highly 
finished, 10-18 tractor and a. 15-27 
tractor belted to a Case thresher. 

Deere & Co., Moline, 111., in 
addition to the Waterloo Boy, 
featured the following imple- 
ments: No. 6 4-bottom John 
Deere tractor plow ; No. 5 3- 
bo'ttom John Deere tractor plow; 
No. 45 2-bottom tractor plow; 
No. 40 2-bottom Fordson tractor 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



9 






WE USE THE 

DeI^al 

Ciieani Separator 




The best farmers use 
De Laval Cream Sepa- 
rators and De Laval 
Milkers. Therefore the 
best dealers sell them. 



Now is the time to see about the De Laval 
Contract. Perhaps we need a separator or 
milker agency in your town. If you think we 
do send your application to nearest office. 



THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, Ltd. 

MONTREAL PETERBORO WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 



Sooner or later you will sell the 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



10 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



plow; No. 35 5-bottom tractor 
disk plow ; John Deere tractor 
lister; Model B double-action 
pony tractor disk harrow ; Model 
L double-action tractor disk har- 
row ; 12x7 fertilizer single-disk 
John Deere Van Brunt tractor 
drill; No. 3 John Deere Marseilles 
power sheller ; ' 8-ft. John Deere 
binder with tractor hitch ; 10-ft. 
double-gang pulverizer with 
tractor hitch. 

Emerson-Brantingham Imple- 
ment Co., Rockfoird, showed a 
new tractor 'tandem disc harrow 
built on an entirely new principle. 
In addition, they had a complete 
display of such standard E-B 
tractors and tractor tools, as the 
E-B 12-20 tractor, E-B three- 
bottom 'tractor plow, tractor disk 
plow, Geiser threshers, etc. 

The Cleveland Tractor Co., 
Cleveland, Ohio, had a display 
of a distinctly educative nature. 
They showed a Cletrac with its 
tracks laid out so that the tractor 



Do away yntb dusty inside scooping; save 
time, labor and uacks and get more 
for your grain by using the 

Liberty Grain Blower 

Elevates, cleans and (radea 300 to 

800 ba. an hoar with 6 U. P. Only 
ONE moving part. Nobuckets, 
chains or eears. One man can 
move it. Costs half price of old- 

sty'e elevatom. 

EDCE DAAIf llliutrated, ex- 
rilCC DUUn Dlalna thia ereat 
improvement. Send name for eopy. 
LINK MFC. CO. Dept. 708 
Portaj^^Prairle^Jan^^ 




ran back and forth along them, 
exactly as it operates in the field. 
They also showed a side frame 
assembly cut away to show con- 
struction, and a cutaway Cletrac 
engine in operation. 

The International Harvester 
Co., Chicago, showed two Inter- 
national 8-16 tractors, 'two Titan 
10-20 tractors, one International 
15-30, two and three-bottom P. 
& O. plows, a sectional model of 
the 8-16, International motor 
trucks, models G, L and F and 
the speed truck, I.H.C. ensilage 
c u 't t e r , thresher, busker and 
shredder, hay press, cylinder corn 
sheller, feed grinder, drill, culti- 
packer and disc harrow, etc. 

The Hart-Parr Co., Charles 
City, showed their new "20" h.p. 
tractor for the first time, also two 
Hart-Parr "30" tractors, two 
Hart-Parr "20" tractors, two and 
three-bottom Vulcan plows and 
the Vulcan culti-packer. 

Canadian Firms at Columbus 
Tractor Show 

At the recent National Tractor 
Show, held at Columbus, Ohio, 
the Cockshutt Plow Co., Brant- 
ford, Ont., had a nice exhibit of 
their tractor gangs that attracted 
much at'tention. Thousands of 
farmers and dealers who attended 
the show looked over the Can- 
adian product very carefully. It 




\A#RITE us, mentioning tliis publication, for 
catalogues and prices of the famous 
ALL-STEEL RUTH SELF FEEDER, any of the 
six styles of Maytag Washing Machines, Oils, 
Belts, Headlights, and all other Threshers' 
Supplies. (IT^^fc^E^u^N^t^'cWeSg) Do Not Delay. 



mmm 

1 




0- 
■ 



^ HIGH-GRADE; vertical 
engine.»eame as in best 
autos — that haaplentyof power 
and givea no trouble. 

Fuel supply in base— no 
clanger or risk of fire. Gives 
more power to the gallon. No 
tank, no fan. no pac!:ed joints. 

Guarantee<l ai'ainst dcunage 
from freezing. All moving parta 
enclosed. 

CANADIAN -MADE 
4 FROM START TO FimSB 




WRITE 
FOR 
ENGINE 
GUIDE 
BOOK 



The London u • First-ClaM 
engine sold at a moderate price 

LONDON GAS 

POWER CO., LIMITED 

32 York St. London, Can. 



was somewhat of an innovation 
in the American tractor trade to 
see one of Canada's oldest farm 
implement concerns come into 
their midst with a Canadian-made 
line. Accompanying the exhibit 
was E. A. Mott, vice-president; 
W. S. McFarland, Ontario sales 
manager, and Geo. H. Wedlake, 
works manager at Brantford. 

Another Canadian firm we ob- 
served was the Link Manfg. Co., 
of Portage la Prairie, represented 
by H. C. Wallace. This firm 
showed lines of their Liberty 
g'rain blowers. They have a fac- 
tory at Kansas City and do a big 
American 'trade in this line. 

Sawyer-Massey Co., Hamilton, 
Ont., Avere well represented at the 
show with a tasty exhibit of their 
well known separators which 
were on view in the spacious 
booth occupied by the Wallis 
Tractor Co. and the J. I. Case 
Plow Works, of Racine, Wis. 
Accompanying the Wallis and 
J. I. Case Plow Works exhibits 
were H. M. Wallis, president; 
G. C. Weyland, vice-president ; 
R. O. Hendricksdn, vice-presi- 
dent; B. M. Value, foreign sales 
manager, and C. C. Younggreen, 
advertising manager. Thirty 
other factory representatives and 
five branch house managers were 
also present. An interesting feat- 
ure of the exhibit of the J. I. Case 
Plow Works was the gold medal 
won by their tractor in the 
Lincoln, England, 'tractor trials 
held in October last. This was 
awarded by the Royal Agricul- 
tural Society of Great Britain, in 
a contest open to the world. 

General reports received by the 
special representative of Cana- 
dian Farm Implements while at 
the National Tractor Show, re- 
veal the fact that very satisfac- 
tory business was done. Big 
crowds of real farmers and deal- 
ers and distributors were on hand 
daily. The entire show was 
under cover. 



Briscoe Manager in West 



Schibsby Attended Convention 



M. Schibsby, north-western 
manager for the J. I. Case Plow 
Works, of Racine, Wis., at'tended 
the recent convention of the 
North Dakota Implement Deal- 
ers' Association, held at Fargo. 
He reports a big attendance and 
a very interesting meeting. Poor 
crops in North Dakota and bad 
banking practices have produced 
a condition in that state which 
is against good business. It is 
anticipated, however, that sales 
will be better this year. Dealers 
there seem optimistic. Mr. 
Schibsby reports a good demand 
for Wallis tractors from West 
Canadian territory last year and 
looks for grea'tlv increased sales 
in 1921. 



A. H. Laidman, general man- 
ager of the Briscoe Motor Car 
Co., of Brockville, Ont., recently 
spent a few days in Winnipeg on 
his way west on a business trip, 
during which he will visit Regina 
Calgary and Vancouver. Mr. 
Laidman reports the factories 
busy, and states that there is a 
distinct improvement in the auto- 
mobile trade since the start of the 
year. With 'the many improve- 
ments and refinements in the 1921 
models of the Briscoe car the 
company are already experienc- 
ing a very satisfactory demand 
for spring delivery from their 
dealer organization. 

Mr. Laidman believes that 
there is a possibility of a car 
shortage this spring and summer 
should early orders not be placed. 
At present, production is too ex- 
pensive for the car manufacturer 
to carry large stocks without 
definite orders. Last minute 
orders from dealers may therefore 
have to go unfilled, so that it will 
be a good policy for the dealer 
not to hold up orders placed if 
at all possible. Mr. Laidman 
attended the recent motor shows 
at Montreal and London, and re- 
ported good business at those ex- 
hibitions. He is optimistic as 
regards future conditions and 
looks forward to a good year in 
the automobile business. 



White Co. Holds Tractor 
School 



Geo. White & Sons Co., Ltd., 
will hold their annual tractor 
school at their warehouse in 
Brandon March 7 to 12. Among 
other instructors will be an ex- 
pert from the factory of the All- 
Work tractor, the Electric Wheel 
Co., at Quincy, 111., as well as an 
expert from Kokomo, Ind., who 
will explain the design, construc- 
tion and operation of Kingston 
magnetos and carburetors. Fol- 
lowing this school Geo. White & 
Sons Co., Ltd., will hold a con- 
vention of their salesmen. The 
lectures at the tractor school will 
be intensely practical, and will 
include demonstrations in the 
shop of their new three-plow 
tractor, which is going on the 
market this year. This new 
model is of the same horse-power 
as the old one, namely, 14-28. It 
is equipped wi'th roller bearings 
throughout and other minor im- 
provements that will appeal to 
tractor users. 



The Newell Sanders Plow Co., 
Chattanooga, Tenn., a well-known 
U. S. plow manufacturing com- 
pany, announces a 30 per cent, 
reduction in the cost of their 
plows 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



11 




THE MAN WHO 
STICKS SELDOM 

GETS STUCK 




WHITC flOSt CASOUHe 



The Sign that 
Builds Business 
for You 



ii 

Boost Your Sales with 
This Big, Catchy Sign 



I 



F you can get the people looking your way it's 
easier to get them coming your way. 

And that's just what this big, six-foot boy-and- 
slate signboard does for you. 

It is one of the most successful advertising novel- 
ties ever produced. 

We furnish you with this big sign — it's over six 
feet high, cut to shape and strongly constructed 
— ^with copy to chalk up on the slate so you can 
have something new every other day. 

Everywhere this sign is put up it attracts instant 
and constant attention. People talk about it. 
And the dealers who display it get increased sales 
on all En-ar-co products. 

Canadian Oil Companies Ltd. 

TORONTO, LONDON, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, 
ST. JOHN, HALIFAX, WINNIPEG, REGINA, 
SASKATOON, EDMONTON, CALGARY 



Mail Us This Coupon 

You are surely interested in boosting your sales 
of En-ar-co Motor Oils, Gear Grease, Black Beauty 
Axle Grease, White Rose Gasoline, National Light 
Oil. This big sign will do it. Send the coupon 
to-day. It costs you nothing to know all about 
it. Simply fill in and mail us the coupon and 
we will send you full details by return mail. 



CANADIAN OIL COMPANIES LIMITED 



(Your nearest branch) 

Tell me, without obligation, how I can secure your "Boy-and- 
Slate" and Epigram Service. 



NAME. 



STREET 



POST OFFICE PROVINCE.. 



I am in the " business. 

(Indicate kind of business) * C.F.I. 



12 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



i : The Domestic & Farm Ap- 
: pliances Ltd. is a new concern in 
I Toronto. 

i London Motors have been in- 
j corporated at London, Ont., with 
ja capital of $1,000,000. 

The C. L. Best Gas Traction 
iCo., San Leandro, Cal., has 
changed its name to C. L. Best 
I Tractor Co. 

I The new factory of the Flexible 
I Shaft Co is now in operation in 
'Toronto under the direction of L. 
i F. Fitzpatrick. 

1 The Blashill Wire Machinery 
i Co., Montreal, expects to be man- 
jufacturing wire fencing by the 
j early summer months. 
! Plans have been ordered by the 
iSplitdorf Electrical Co. for a plant 
jto be erected at Cicero, a Chicago 
i suburb, to cost about $700,000. 
j The Canadian Firol Spark Plug 
I Co., with head office at Hamilton, 
I Ont., has been incorpora'ted. The 
i capital stock of the company is 
$100,000. 

R. H. Mulch, formerly sales 
i manager of the Chevrolet Motor 
j Company of Canada, Oshawa, has 
jbeen appointed to a position with 
General Motors in New York. 

B. F. Beaty, who was recently 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTEDO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for: 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Ltd.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
• Co,; J. I. Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadian Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; Emerson-Branting- 
hani Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Stanley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
?s Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.: 
Minneapolis Threshing Machine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer- Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



elected treasurer qf the Universal 
Milking Machine Co., Columbus, 
O., at a meeting of the board of 
directors, has assumed his new 
position. 

According to the Alton (111.) 
Telegram, stockholders of the 
Hapgood Plow Co. of that ci'ty 
have decided to surrender the 
charter of the corporation and 
discontinue business permanently. 

It has been reported that W. 
R. Campbell, secretary and assist- 
ant general manager of the Ford 
Motor Co. of Canada, will succeed 
F. L. Klingensmith as vice-presi- 
dent and general manager of the 
Ford Motor Co. 

Reginald Heinzelmann, forty- 
five years old, of Belleville, 111., 
manufacturer of vehicles and an 
inventor, died at Palm BeacTi, 
Fla., where he had gone for his 
health. Mr. Heinzelmann was 
inventor of the Timken roller 
bearing. 

The London Concrete Machin- 
ery Co. at London, Ontario, have 
lately experienced a great increase 
of export orders, and are enlarg- 
ing their plant to meet this de- 
mand. It is further understood 
that this company are about to 
erect a large plant for the produc- 
tion of gasoline engines. 

Canadian Perfect Wheels, Ltd., 
are a recently incorporated com- 
pany operating at Listowel, On- 
tario. The goods to be manu- 
factured are automobile wheels, 
disc, wire and wood, and a general 
line of accessories. 

The Stewart Sheaf Loader Co., 
Winnipeg, is at present engaged 
in an effort to increase i'ts capi- 
tal. The company state that with 
increased capital a million dollars 
worth of sheaf loaders and separ- 
ators will be produced this year. 

The Delco Light Department of 
the Breen Motor Co., Winnipeg, 
held a sales convention on Feb- 
ruary 17 and 18. H. W. Prior, 
divisional sales manager for the 
Delco Ligh't factory, addressed 
the convention. 



KING 



The Matthews Engineering Co., 
Sandusky, Ohio, is completing a 
factory addition, 100x140, which 
will be used for increasing the 
production of its Matthews Full 
Automatic lighting plants. 

The Bates Machine & Tractor 
Co., Joliet, 111., has announced a 
reduction of $255 on the Bates 
S'teel Mule tractor. This is a cut 
of 13j^ per cent from the price 
asked during the past season. 

Harry A. Reed, for the last five 
years wes'tern sales manager of 
the Hart-Parr Co., has entered 
the distributing business at Oma- 
ha, Neb., as general manager of 
the Omaha Tractor & Supply 
Co. 

W. Youngblud, lately tire sales 
manager of the Quebec division 
for the Dominion Rubber System, 
assumes the position of sales 
manager of the ■ tire department 
for Ames-Holden-McCready, Lim- 
ited. 

The Oak Tire and Rubber Co. 
Limited, have found that increas- 
ing business during the past year 
necessitates an expansion of their 
plant at Oakville, Ont. A storey 
is to be added to the present 
building. 

William Beardmore & Co., of 
Glasgow, Scotland, have recently 
opened a Canadian branch in 
Montreal, where they are show- 
ing a water pump that promises 
to be a great success among 
Canadian users. 

The Rock Island Plow Co., 
Rock Island, 111., announces the 
appointment of B. T. McDonald 
as works manager. Mr. Mc- 
Donald comes from" the Moline 
Plow Co., with whom he has been 
connected for several years. 

The Stinson Tractor Company, 
Superior, Wis., will open wi'th a 
full operating force in the very 
near future. The sale of $217,000 
worth of stock, proceeds of which 
are to be used in the enlargement 
of the plant, has practically been 
completed. 

The Timken Roller Bearing 
Co., Canton, O., announces the 
appointment of L. M. Klinedinst 
as assistant manager of sales. 



STON 



Mr. Klinedinst has served the 
company for several years as 
manager of the tractor and imple- 
ment division. ' 

See & Smith Mo'tors, Limited, 
have been incorporated to manu- 
facture engines, motors, machin- 
ery, automobiles, trucks, acces- 
sories, etc., with $260,000 capital, 
by James S. Beatty, John 
Rumball, and others. The h^ad 
office will be at Toronto. 

C. M. Eason has resigned as 
vice-president of the Hyatt Roller 
Bearing Co., and on March 1st 
joined the Samson Tractor Go., 
Janesville, Wis. Mr. Eason's 
work in the Hyatt organization 
has been taken over by B. G. 
Koether. 

Antigo Tractor Co., An'tigo, 
Wis., has bought the plant of the 
Murray-Mylrea Co., where its 
tractors have been manufactured 
for some time past. The tractor 
company recently increased its 
capitalization from $500,000 to 
$1,000,000. 

^ A large piece of land has been: 
purchased by the Anglo-Ameri-' 
can Motors, at Mimico, Ont., for 
the erection of a factory for the 
purpose of manufacturing the La' 
Marne automobile. The purchase 
price is in the neighborhood 'of 
$100,000. '> ' 

Oliver T. Eads was elected 
vice-president of the Collins Plow 
Co., Quincy, 111., at a recent direc- 
tors meeting. He has becomd a 
stockholder in the corporation 
also. Mr. Eads was formerly 
general manager of the Collins 
company. 

The Splitdorf Co. is now in- 
stalled in the new Splitdorf Bldg., 
2,900 Michigan Blvd., Chicago. 
The building now houses the con- 
solidated executive offices of ijhe 
branches of the Sumter divisi'on 
and 'the Splitdorf Service & Sales 
Co., now known as the Splitdorf 
Co. . ~ I : 

The Hold-Mar Vacuum Piston,; 
Ltd., has been incorporated I to 
manufacture iron and steel prod- 
ucts, with a capital of $100,000, 
by Charles H. Yochum, 107 Gil- 
mour Avenue, Toronto; Ernest. 
M. Brooks, and others. The h^ad, 
office of the company will bejat| 
Toronto. 1 ; 

An addition to the plant of Ijhe 
Chatham Malleable and Steel 
Manufacturing Company, Limi- 
ted, manufacturers of automotive 
and hardware specialties and san- 
itary stable equipment at Chat- 
ham, Ont., is now complete, and 
the necessary machinery is npw 
being installed. 

F. E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, 
O., have issued new prices on 
their lines of pumps, hay tools, 
door hangers, clamps, merchan- 
dise conveyors, store ladders. 



IGNITION SERVICE 

SPARK PLUGS — COILS ^ 
MAGNETOS— SWITCHES 

KOKOMO ELECTRIC CO. 

KOKOMO - - INDIANA - . . U.S.A. 



Marcli, H»21 



Canadian Farm Implements 



13 



Unlimited Sales Possibilities 

with the 110 Volt 

Northam Ekctric 

Universal Power and Light Plant 

Vy^HATEVER call is made upon 
you for a dependable Power 
and Light Plant, you can readily 
specify the Northern Electric 110 Volt 
Universal. 

The design of the Universal Plant 
embodies every requirement of a sub- 
stantial generating system. The motor 
is of 4 cylinder, cast- en -bloc con- 
struction. Four inch stroke: de- 
mountable head. Is water cooled 
and of the highest grade material 
and construction throughout. Will operate on either gasoline or kerosene. 




110 Volt Universal Power and Light Plant 



This Plant is furnished with or without batteries as desired. 

For town, store, house or farm lighting, the Universal Plant is supreme and it is 
being used with great success in boat lighting, wireless telegraphy, moving pic- 
ture machines, battery charging, etc. 

Right in your territory there is many a use for such a plant. One or more on 
your floor will open up a field of vast possibilities. Investigate our Dealer 
proposition to-day. 

Our nearest Branch House will 
send you full particulars 

Nortfi(^rft Ehctr/c Compafty 

LIMITED 



MONTREAL QUEBEC TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY 

HALIFAX OTTAWA HAMILTON LONDON WINDSOR REGINA 



EDMONTON 
VANCOUVER 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 




LONDON CONCRETE MIXERS 

This type machine made in two sizes. Capacities 40 and 60 cu- 
yds. per "day respectively. Thousands in use for such work as 
building Foundations, Barn Walls, Silos, Piers, Abutments and 
Irrigation work. Described in Bulletin B. Agents make big 
money selling London Concrete Mixers, Block Machines, Brick 
Machines, and other London Lines. 

Write for catalogue and terms for agents. 

London Concrete Machinery Co. Limited 

DEPT. K LONDON, CANADA 



DEALERS WANTED 




Territory is now being assigned in 
MANITOBA, SASKATCHEWAN and ALBERTA, for 

THE BATES STEEL MULE 

AND 

THE BATES WHEEL TRACTOR 

Crawler-type tractors in 18-25 H.P. and 25-35 H.P. Wheel-type in 
15-25 H.P. 

Can absolutely guarantee to fill all orders for this year — ^factory cap- 
acity increased to 300 tractors per month. 

Bates' dealers can guarantee more power per dollar than any other 
machine on the market. Place one tractor in a district and it will 
sell every other prospect. If you want to connect with a real live 
proposition, write, phone or wire — 

Jones Tractor and Implement Co., Ltd. 

REGINA, SASK. 

CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS FOR BATES TRACTORS 



porch and lawn swings, etc. The 
new prices show ^reductions on 
the major portion of the products 
of from 10 to 15 per cent. 

While inspecting the Janesville 
plant of the Hudson Mfg. Co., 
President Hanna announced that 
an increase of 25 per cent in the 
production of the Janesville works 
will be made this year. The com- 
pany also contemplates improve- 
ments in the plants at De Pere, 
Wis., and Hastings, Minn. 

The International Malleable 
Iron Co., Guelph, Ont., have in- 
stalled, in an addition to their 
plant, complete equipment for the 
machining of their malleable and 
cast iron pipe fittings and malle- 
able and gray iron castings. This 
plant has practically doubled in 
capacity in the last five years. 

The Moline Plow Co., Moline, 
111., announces the promotion of 
H. B. Dinneen to take charge of 
the production of all Moline im- 
plements. Mr. Dinneen, who 
formerly was manager of the 
John Deere Plow Works, has 
served one year as general trade 
manager of the Moline company. 

The Holt Farm Light Co., of 
Toledo, has been chartered with 
a capital of $1,000,000 for the pur- 
pose of manufacturing a farm 
lighting plant. The new company 
has taken over the plant and 
assets of the Automatic Light 
Co., of Ludington, Mich., manu- 
facturers of the Holt 110-volt 
direct current, without storage 
battery farm lighting system. 

The Huron Specialty Casting 
Company, now located at Clinton, 
Ont., will move to Goderich when 
their plant now in course of con- 
struction there is completed. The 
present plant commenced opera- 
tion on June 20th, 1920. It is a 



Three Types of BISSELL Double Action Tractor Disc Harrows 




No. 3 is our Handy Controlled type, admitted to be 
the latest development in Disk Harrow construc- 
tion. By turning the wheel, the cut of both 
Harrows can be changed as much or as little as 
desired. Under average conditions from one-half 
to three-quarters turn of the wheel is sufficient. 
The tractor operator can reach the wheel without 
changing his position, and he is able tojregulate 
the cut of both harrows without taking his eyes 
off the tractor or the work ahead of him. 



. No. 1 is the standard 
Double - Action Disc 
Harrow, and can be" used 
with either horses or 
tractor. 

No. 2 is our 
one lever Uni- 
tary Con- 
trolled type 
for use with 
Tractor, and 

it can be operated from~the tractor seat, the 
one lever 

opera- 

t i n g ^ Oj^S^ h^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ # ^ ^K^uil^ 

. , Ta^ /^e*^^^^=^"^^^ j^eFmr -I!- \ %^^^^^^^^ ^^m) - with the 

b « t h -^^W^^^X f^^^^^ ^"^^ ^^J^ "Bissell" 

mach- U; M ' fr fl^Ji j0=SSti»^' makes a 

ines. jK Lah"^ -S^ f F m.-^ \=- perfect seed-bed. It allows greater root expansion 

for the growing crop. Bissell Double-Action Disk 
Harrows are especially suitable for use with light 
_ tractors or with horses. Above cuts show some 

sizes suitable for light tractor. 

Manufactured by T. E. BISSELL Co. Limited. Elora, Ont. 

Sold by: JOHN DEERE PLOW CO. LTD., Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary 




building 40x200 feet with a capac- 
ity of three tons or more of grey 
iron castings a day. 

Death came suddenly February 
3 to A. T. Van Scoy, who was 
in charge of the International 
Harvester Co. plant at Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Returning from 
luncheon, he fell unconscious in 
the lobby of 'the building in which 
his office was located and died 
in a few minutes. 

A new industry, which will be 
in operation early this month at 
Brockville, Ont., is Machinery 
and Foundries, Limited, recently 
incorporated to manufacture hand 
and power pumps and gray iron 
and brass castings. The plant 
of 'the company consists of a 
machine shop 275x50 feet and a 
foundry 150x60 feet. 

One of the latest additions to 
the line of the Avery Co., Peoria, 
111., is a silo. filler of 8-10 ton 
capacity. The machine is built 
to combine light weight with 
large capacity and durability. 
Special pains have been taken, to 
make it ligh't running. The throat 
and feed hopper are 13 inches 
wide, and the cut is full 13 inches. 

The Brantford Computing 
Scale Co., Limited, have acquired 
the Ker & Goodwin plant in West 
Brantford and will move their 
business there. The building was 
originally built for munition pur- 
poses and is 100x360 feet, with 
about 15^ acres of land. The 
manufacture of small motors and 
cream separators is under con- 
templation, but has not been 
definitely decided upon. 



Allis-Chalmers Reorganzie 
Tractor Division 



The Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co., 
Milwaukee, announce that B. M. 
Seymour succeeds F. W. Kamm 
as manager of the tractor divi- 
sion. Geo. J. Gardiner has been 
appointed assistant manager and 
sales manager. The advertisi'ng 
department will be in charge of 
L. C. Pounds, formerly of the 
Louisville, Ky., branch. A. M. 
Bauman is assistant advertising 
manager. C. Edwin Search will 
act as general works manager, 
assisted by members of the trac- 
tor committee. 

The company recently com- 
pleted a new foundry, 500x140, 
with basement. This has been 
equipped with a view to securing 
maximum production. It pro- 
vides a capacity for all engine and 
transmission castings required 'to 
produce 100 tractors per day. 



Hard, work, determination and 
foresight; they're the boys who 
bring home the bacon 1 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



15 



Notice to Dealers 



WESTERN IMPLEMENTS LIMITED, beg to advise the 
trade that they have purchased the business of the Metal 
Specialty Company Limited, and are now manufacturing: 

Farmers* Special Fanning Mills 
Rotary Automatic Picklers 
Beaver Automatic Picklers 
Corrugated Steel Stock Tanks * 
Fordson Fenders 

Beaver Brand Indented Cylinders and 
Rotary Screens for Cleaning and 
Grading Seed Grains 



It will be a money-maker to you to handle 
these lines, together with the 

Plow Shares, Wood Goods, Binder and Mower Repairs, etc. 

sold by us in the past. We are also 
distributors for Saskatchewan of the 

Christiansen Mulcher backers and Plow Harrows 



Write for New Price List. We Ship Promptly. 

Western Implements Limited 



6th AVE. & SCARTH ST. 



REGINA, SASK. 



Dealers: Now is the Time to Order 

-•BULL DOG" 
Smut Cleaners 



Sizes : 
18 and 24-in. 




The only 

Machine 

that will 

Success- 
fully 
Treat Oats 
and 

Barley IVi^^^L^ UMBBHI ^^^P 

the day 
Order is 

Absolutely Guaranteed to " Received 
Kill Smut. Clean Seed Means Bigger Yields 

No other machine built will successfully clean oats and barley. The "Bull Dog" 
does this because of our patented feeder device. This attachment forces every 
floating kernel THROUGH THE SOLUTION, thoroughly treating it. The " BuU 
Dog operates by hand or power. Strongly built and braced. Extra long carrier 
tor wagon box dehvery. False perforated bottom in carrier no liquid is wasted. 
Large, low feed box. Double paddle skimmer. Large galvanized, rust-proof tank. 

DEALERS: Don't delay ordering. This machine sells easily because it does better 
work than any other. Show your customers that clean seed pays. 

THE TWIN CITY SEPARATOR CO. LTD. 



OUELCH STREET 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Address all Correspondence from Southern and Central Alberta to 
R. W. DOW; Box 1406, Calgary, Alberta 



For Substantial, Profitable Business 
SAWYER-MASSEY 



Tracfors 



Threshers 



Road -making Machinery 

To assure cheaper production the farmer must use the most up-to-date equipment. 
Sawyer-Massey tractors and threshers mean grealter acreage, bigger crops and better profits, 
at lower cost. Our goods are backed by an unequalled reputation for quality, construction 
and efficiency in operation. Known everywhere, Sawyer-Massey lines sell easier — and stay 
sold. The Sawyer-Massey line means prestige and profits for the man who handles it. Live 
Western dealers should communicate with us at once. 



Write 
the 

Nearest 
Branch 





We are Canadian Distributors of 



Wallis Tractors and J. I. Case Plow Works 
Company's Power^Tillage Implements 



With the Wallis Tractor and J. I. Case Plow Works Co.'s Tractor Tools the dealer has a 
line that is time-tried and proven. We can supply you with full information on this line by return 
• mail. Are we represented in your district? If not, grasp this money-making opportuaity. 
For literature, prices and agency details, address 

Sawyer-Massey Company Limited 

Head Office and Factories: Hamilton, Ont. 
WINNIPEG REGINA • SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 



10 



Canadian Farm Implements 



Marcli, 1920 



Northcott Appointed General 
Sales Manager 



The Goold, Shapley & Muir 
Co., head office, Brantford, Ont., 
annovmces that C. W. Northcott, 
manager of the Regina branch of 
the company, has been prorhoted 
to the position of general sales 
manager. Mr. Northcott left Re- 
gina on March 5th, and is now 
resident in Brantford. In his new 
post he will have supervision over 
all sales, both east and west, and 
jurisdiction over Western Canada. 
Mr. Northcott, as general sales 
manager wall make frequent trips 
over the western territory in con- 
nection , wi'th business in the 
western field. 

C. W. Northcott was born in 
Durham county, Ontario, in 1882, 
and was educated in the public 
and hig-'h schools at Markham. 
When sixteen years of age he 
entered the employment of the 
Ontario Wind Engine & Pump 
Co., Toronto, being transferred 
to 'the Winnipeg branch when it 
was opened in 1904. 

In December, 1906, he severed 
his connection with this concern, 
entering- the hardware business in 




past, will be handled through 
United Eng-ines & Threshers, 
Ltd. C. E. Trott will have charge 
of all western credits and collec- 
tions for the company. 



Advance -Rumely Held 
Dealers' School 



Class in Session at Advance 

Calgary, where he remained for 
one' year. He then went to Bran- 
don as sales manager of Manitoba 
Engines, Ltd. In April, 1911, he 
went to Calgary where he opened 
a branch for Manitoba Engines, 
Ltd., remaining there until No- 
vember, 1915, when he came east 
to Regina as manager of 'the Sas- 
katchewan branch of Goold, 



Guarantee Your Customers Clean Seed 
by Selling Them 

"EASTLAKE'' 
Grain Picklers 



Made of Heavy 
Galvanized Iron. 
Strongly reinforced. 
A strong, well-made 
Smut Destroyer, at 
a price that meets 
any competition. 



Crated for shipment with legs 
detached. J-.ight in weight. Can 
be shipped by Express at small 
cost. 




Note the position of 
strong, galvanized 
mesh. Grain can be 
dumped rapidly 
without wasting any 
solution. Saves its 
cost in a single sea- 
son. 



Smut causes a loss of 
thousands of dollars 
annually. "K a s t la k e" 
treated seed means 
better yields and bigger 
profits. 



Order a Stock— NOW 

Immerses and Treats EVERY KERNEL 

The Pickler season is here. Your business depends upon the success of your cus- 
tomers. The use of thoroughly clean, treated seed grain is essential. With the 
"Eastlake" Grain Pickler, the farmer can immerse his seed for a few seconds or 
several minutes as desired. Using the "Eastlake" he assures the complete eradica- 
tion of smut balls, and prevents possible loss. A low-set, strong and efficient Pjckler 
with ample capacity for any farm. Display one on your floor right away. Profitable 
business will follow. _ , j 

Concentrate on "Eastlake" Products this year. A complete hne of Galvanized 
Shingles, Siding, Eave-Trough, Well Curbing, Culverts, Tanks, Garages, Portable 
Granaries, etc. Ask for illustrated literature and agency proposition. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

Manufacturers 

797 Notre Dame Ave. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Rumely 1921 Dealers' School 

Shapley and Muir Co., Ltd. In 
1918 Mr. Northcott was placed in 
charge of all western business of 
his company, which position he 
has held with marked success un- 
til his recent appointment to the 
important position of general 
sales manager of the organization 
on March first, 1921. With a 
Avide experience in the trade, and 
possessed of great sales and exe- 
cutive ability, Mr. Northcott is 
eminently suited for the post he 
now occupies with the Brantford 
organization. His many friends 
in the west will learn with pleas- 
ure of his well-merited promotion. 

C. E. Bell who has been assist- 
ant manager at Regina for the 
past year, will have charge of 
sales for Saskatchewan, while F. 
A. Nuttall will continue in charge 
of sales for the Goold, Shapley 
organization in Manitoba terri- 
tory. Alberta business, as in the 



The accompanying picture was 
taken during the Advance- 
Rumely 1921 Dealers' School, 
held at La Porte, from Janviary 
31st to February 11th, and shows 
a scene in the laboratory, where 
the dealers were given detailed 
instructions on the Oilpull tractor 
and Rumely truck. This school 
was held in two sessions — tractor 
session and 'truck session. Four 
high-class entertainments were 
given during the school, and mid- 
way between the two sessions a 
banquet was held. 

The dealers spent their time 
profitably in the lecture room, in 
the laboratory, and on tractor 
operation. The leq'tures and 
classes, which proved so success- 
ful last year, were carried out 
.practically the same this year. 

The dealers who attended, left 
at the school's close with renewed 
enthusiasm, for^they had learned 
fully regarding the quality of 
Rumely products, and the 
strength of the Company behind 
the piroduct. They are now well 
equipped to render real service to 
Oilpull owners, and to give expert 
assistance to their trade. 



You may have all the time in 
the world, but don't judge the 
importance of the other fellow's 
time by 'that of your own. 



Ma^ oil wagon 




TANKS 

A PROFITABLE 
SELLER AT THIS 
SEASON 



Built to Last and Give Satisfactory Service 

A COMPLETE TANK Ready to Use, at a Low Price 

305 and 435 Gals. Capacity 

WRITE NOW FOR FULL PARTICULARS, 
:: PRICES AND DISCOUNTS :: 

Western Steel Products Limited 



WINNIPEG 

Man. 



REGINA 

Sask. 



CALGARY 
Alta. 



EDMONTON 

Alta. 



March, 1920 



Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



Sell Front Seed Delivery 

McCormick and Deering Grain Drills 




/j^UR nation wide advertising campaign has sold and is selling thousands of these 
crop-increasing drills. There is a real reason back of the growing popularity of Deering 
and McCormick double disk grain drills. Front seed delivery actually increases crop yields. 
Unquestioned farmers' testimony estabhshes this fact. You can sell Deering or McCormick 
drills on this one feature alone, aside from the other strong points of construction that 
make for light draft, accuracy and durability. 



OUR WAY 



THE OTHER WAY 



Every seed that drops 
through a Deering or McCor- 
mick grain tube must follow 
the clean, straight, enclosed 
channel to the extreme bot- 
tom of the furrow. It falls 
with the downward turn of 
the disk blades and strikes the 
furrow bottom where the soil 
is moist and compact. Every 
seed starts and grows evenly, 
ripens evenly, and produces 
one hundred per cent. 



GROUND LEVEL 





This is the way the other 
fellow drops the seed . 1 1 falls 
at the rear, against the up- 
ward turn of the blades. Part 
of the seed is thrown back- 
ward, striking the furrow after 
the loose top soil has partially 
filled the trench. Some of the 
seed sprouts at once, some a 
little later when the first rain 
falls and some seeds never do 
start. The resulting stand is 
ragged, and harvest catches 
many green heads which re- 
duce the grade at the elevator. 

GROUND LEVEL 



..STi'^.o n nn'^a g sari 




When the Trade Comes it will Come With a Rush. Don't be Caught Unprepared 

International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA ^^o. 

HAMILTON CANADA 

WESTERN BRANCHES — Brandon Winnipeg. Man. Calgary Edmonton Lethbridge. Alta.. 

ESTEVAN. N BATTLEFORO. REGINA. SASKATOON YORKTON SASK 

EASTERN BRANCHES — Hamilton London Ottawa Ont Montreal Quebec. Que . ST John. N B. 




18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



The Price Situation and 
Raw Material Costs 



The International Hai^vester 
Co., Chicago, have issued a gen- 
eral letter on the price situation 
in the industry, also a series of 
excellen't charts showing the ad- 
vance ill price of other commodi- 
ties as compared with farm im- 
plements. The company state 
that their prices have never ad- 
vanced in proportion to the ad- 
vances made on other articles of 
general consumption. According 
to U.S. Government statis'tics, 
cloths and clothing went up to a 
figure of 258 per cent above 1914 
levels. At January 1st last, de- 
spite substantial reductions, the 
present price of these commodi- 
ties are still 122 per cent above 
1914 levels. The present prices 
of International farm machinery 
are yiVz per cent above 1914 



prices. The general letter issued 
says in part : 

"As a further reason for the 
drop in the textile prices, the raw 
materials, both wool and cotton, 
h&ve suffered a severe decline ; 
while the present prices of ma'ter- 
ials used in the construction of 
farm machinery still show a much 
greater advance over 1914 levels 
than do farm machinery prices. 
The January 1st, 1921, prices, as 
shown on Chart 3, show the 
present prices of coke carry an 
increase over 1914 of 200 per cent, 
coal 188 per cent, pig iron 142 
per cent, steel 104^ per cent, 
lumber 95 per cent, wages 159 
per cent, freight rates 101 per 
cent; while the prices of I.H.C. 
farm machines show an average 
increase of only 72j^ per cent. 

"We are not attempting to pre- 
dict the course of future prices, 
but wish to call attention to the 



PRESENT RAW MATERIAL PRICES 
Showing the Per Cent of Increase of Prices of Raw Materials, Wages and Freight, 
January 1. 1921. over 1914, Compared with the Per Cent of Increase 
ia the Price of IHC Farn) Machines 




fact that 80 per cent of the cost 
of materials listed and 72 per cent 
of the transportation cost are 
paid for labor ; and that future 
prices, whether up or down, must 
be governed largely by the fluc- 
tuations in the labor rate. 



"STANDARD" FANNING MILLS 

Mean Graded Seed-Greater Crops-Greatest Profits 



Canada's 
Foremost 
Grain Cleaner 



Clean, Grade and 
Separate 
ALL GRAINS 

Assures Better 
Crops for the 
Farmer— B ett er 
Business for the 
Dealer 




Four Sizes: 
24, 32, 40 
and '48 Inch 



Exceptional 
Capacity 

Strongly Built 

Smooth 
Running 



They Capture the Trade for the Dealer 



Over each of the five wheat gang sieves we have a set of stationary 
wooden slats, which work on the sieve, at all times keeping the sievea 
clean, evenly distributing the grain over the FULL surface of the sieve so 
that EVERY part of the sieve MUST be doing its share of the work and 
EVERY kernel of grain must come in contact with the deve. This is the 
reason no wheat goes over with the tailings, as is the case with most 
cleaners. These slats PUSH the wheat through the perforation, keeping 
the oats flat and carrying; them over. That is why we can guarantee twice 
the capacity of any other mill having the same sieve surface. THE 
WEATHER WILL NOT AFFECT THESE SLATS. 

"STANDARD" Mills are guaranteed to perfectly separate Wild and Tame Oats 

from Wheat and Barley. Also clean and grade: Wheat, Oats, Barley, Flax, Rye, 

Timothy, Alfalfa and all Grass Seeds. They clean and grade more grain in an hour 
than any other fanning mill built — and do it TWICE AS WELL. 

The "STANDARD" is an all-purpose, large capacity machine which is meeting the 
requirements of the most particular farmer and seedsman. Don't fail to see it. 

DEALERS :~Write for full Particulars 



Note These Features: 

Adjustable Force Feed Works 
Automatically, without ad- 
justments; 

Interchangeable Screens. Strong, 
sagless sieves; 

Improved gangs, with distri- 
butors and wild oat separator; 

Adjustable deflector for regu- 
lating the undershot blast; 

Double-head baggers or wagon 
box elevators can be supplied 
for all sizes. 



THE STANDARD FANNING MILL COMPANY LTD. 

WINNIPEG MANITOBA 



"During- 1919 we reduced the 
prices of our machinery, believing 
that costs would come down. 
Contrary to our expectations, 
however, costs of material and 
labor did not decrease ; in fact, 
these costs kept on increasing and 
we were forced to readjust our 
prices upward. 

"The charts we enclose have 
been made up from government 
figures and from the bes't avail- 
able information. They show 
conclusively that during and 
since the war we have been able 
to hold the price of farm ma- 
chinery nearer the 1914 price 
levels than any similar manufac- 
tured product. In fact, farm im- 
plements are the lowest in price 
of any product, manufactured 
from materials such as enter in'to 
farm machines, of¥ered to the 
American public to-day." 

Reference to the chart shown 
brings out the following very im- 
portant points : 

The prices of raw rnaterials, 
wages and freight, the items 
which determine the cost of pro- 
duction, are still advanced above 
1914 prices to a point far beyond 
the price of the finished machines. 
The price at which a manufac- 
tured product can be sold is de- 
termined by the cost of produc- 
tion, and it should be evident 
from this chart 'that the cost of 
production of farm machines to- 
day would justify an even higher 
price than is quoted for the fin- 
ished product. 

The prices of I.H.C. farm ma- 
chines to-day are nearer the 1914 
prices than are the prices of any 
of the materials or items entering 
into the cos't of producing these 
machines. 

Note further: 

Eighty per cent of the cost of 
producing farm irn,plements is 
paid for labor — not only the labor 
in the implement factories, but 
the labor employed in producing 
the materials consumed by 'them 
and in the transportation of these 
materials to the factories. Much 
of this 80 per cent labor cost is, 
therefore, beyond the farm imple- 
ment manufacturer's control. 



Quebec Finances Tractor 
Purchases 



With a view to encouraging 
the purchase of tractors on credit 
by Quebec farmers, the Banque 
Nationale has agreed, at the re- 
quest of the tractor company wi'th 
whom an arrangement was made 
by the Quebec Department of 
Agriculture, to advance the 
amount necessary for the pur- 
chase of a tractor to any reliable 
farmer. These advances are made 
through any of the bank's 'two 
hundred and seventy-two bran- 
ches. 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



19 



New Huber Manager at 
Brandon 



H. W. Brown, Minneapolis, 
manager of the business of the 
Huber Manufacturing Co. in the 
North-western states and West^ 
ern Canada announces the ap- 
pointment of F. X. Chauvin as 
manager of the Winnipeg branch 
of the company. Mr. Chauvin 
succeeds Joe Neilly who managed 
the business of the Huber organi- 
zation at that point for several 
years. Mr. Neilly's future plans 
are not announced. 

.Mr.. Chauvin was formerly con- 
nected with - the Sawyer-Massey 
Co. and Mitchells Hardware Ltd., 
at Brandon. The Huber Manfg. 
Co., at Marion, O., are very busy 
at the present time. They usu- 
ally operate on part time during 
'the fall monljis. This year the 
factory has been working at full 
capacity on full time turning out 
tractors and threshers for the 
spring demand. They have large 
stocks ready for West Canadian 
business. 



Fairbanks-Morse Executives 
Visit Winnipeg Office 

C. J. Brittain, vice-president in 
charge of sales of the Canadian 
Fairbanks-Morse Co., Montreal, 
recently spent a few days at the 
Winnipeg office of the company. 
Mr. Brittain left Winnipeg for 
Vancouver and will re'turn east 
the latter part of the month,, stop- 
ping ofif for a few days at Winni- 
peg on his way east. Mr. Brittain 
was formerly manager of the 
Winnipeg branch of the company. 

Recent visitors to the Winni- 
peg branch were George L. Nies, 
manager of the Calgary branch, 
and A. I. Turn-bull, manager at 
Saskatoon. 



Massey-Harris Manager Dead 

D. Macpherson, manager at 
Yorkton for Massey-Harris Co., 
died suddenly on March 1st. He 
was buried in Winnipeg on 
March 4th. The late Mr. Mac- 
pherson had been with the firm 
since 1903, his record being one 
of steady advancement. He 
leaves a widow and three children. 



New International Posters 



In the implement trade the 
aggressive dealer will find that 
selling repairs for machines al- 
ready in the field is one of the 
best paying lines that can be 
handled. 

The International Harvester 
Co., Chicago, recently issued two 
large attractive posters dealing 
with their repair service. These 
posters should be a business 
building possibility when hung on 



the walls of the dealer's ware- 
house. Probably more repair 
parts will be sold . during 1921 
than during any previous year. 
Repair trade pays a bigger profit 
per dollar of investment than any 
other line of farm equipment the 
dealer can handle. In addition, 
prompt repair service is some- 
thing the value of which the. 
dealer cannot overlook in connec- 
tion with his business. 



Be it ever so homely, there's 
no face like your own. 



C. R. Stephens Dead 



Charles R. Stephens, formerly 
one of the principal owners of the 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111., 
died suddenly at Los Angeles, on 
February 9th. He was a brother 
of G. A. S'tephens, and younger 
son of George Stephens, one of 
the founders of the company. 
The deceased gentleman was born 
at Moline in 1862. Since the sale 
of the Stephens interests in the 
plow company to John N. Willys, 
Mr. Stephens had spent most of 



iiis time in California. He had 
recently purchased one of the 
finest residences in Los Angeles. 



Gilson Handle Vega Cream 
Separators 



The Gilson Manufacturing Co., 
of Guelph, Ont., have been ap- 
pointed distributors for the Vega 
Cream Separator, manufactured 
by the Vega Separator Co., Ltd., 
of Eskilstuna, Sweden. The ar- 
rangement applies to Ontario and 
all of Eastern Canada. 



Ulassev - HaiVis 



i 



■^21'°" «' llic Sol 



/ // 



Ads That Help the Implement Dealer 



HE Advertisements reproduced above are a few of a 
series now appearing in all of the leading Farm Papers. 



Every Implement Dealer realizes how much easier it is to 
sell a well advertised line of implements. This is because the 
"Prospect's" mind has been favorably impressed by the 
reading of the Ads, and in fact, in many cases, the reading 
of the Ads creates your "Prospect." 

This Farm Paper Series, together with our Direct-by-Mail 
Advertising, consisting of numerous attractive folders are a 
powerful factor in preparing the way for the Massey-Harris 
agent, and in making it easy to sell Massey-Harris Implements. 

No need to explain who Massey-Harris is, and what the 
name stands for. It is known to all farmers and stands for 
the best in Farm Implements, and has done so for generations. 

Applications for representation in vacant 
territories should be addressed to the 
Manager of the Branch nearest you. 

MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



TORONTO, ONT. 



Branches af— Montreal, Moncton, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Swift Current, Yorkton, 
Calgary, Edmonton. Trar-'^^r Houses af— Vancouver and Kamloops. 

Warehouses at mw«<y other points. 



20 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



TLL tell CANADlAr ! 





C/ln advertising campaign in the 
leading farm journals and news- 
papers, covering every province, 
will carry the CaloriC message 
of comfort and economy through- 
out the Dominion in 192 1. CaloriC 
advertising and sales co-operation 
is a most valuable asset to the 
CaloriC dealer. 



March, 1921 



Canadian Faim Implements 



21 



1 1 



m 



J..1I 



nil 






IN CANADA 

The Caloric is the same heating plant that is such a phenomenal success 
in England and other European Countries, in Alaska and the United States ; 
hundreds of Calorics also have been installed in the Dominion of Canada. 

OPPORTUNITY FOR DEALERS 

Thousands of prominent merchants in different countries have found the CaloriC 
the nearest to 100% satisfactory of any article they have ever sold, and with 
many it has rapidly developed into the biggest asset of their business. 

The Caloric has these distinct advantages from the merchandising standpoint: 

A simplified warm-air heating system with a market in almost every home — 
also a vast market in heating stores, churches and other buildings. 

Low in cost and easily and quickly handled 
with small capital. 

Dealer profits that are exceptionally attractive. 

Sold under a Moneyback Guarantee that pro- 
tects both seller and buyer. 

Proven and perfected through years of service 
— over 125,000 Calorics in use. 

Selling Season every day in the year. Exclusive 
selling territory. • 

Backed by the whole-souled co-operation of one 
of the most successful selling organizations in 
the world. 

For details of the CaloriC opportunity, write or 
wire today to 

THE MONITOR STOVE CO., LIMITED 

205-N Hobberlin Office Bldg., 9 Richmond Street, East 

Toronto, Ontario 



DISTRIBUTING POINTS 
Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon Vancouver Quebec St. Johns Charlottetown 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Saskatchewan and Alberta— CANADIAN SUPPLY COMPANY Ltd., Saskatoon 
British CoIumbia—McLENNAN & McFEELY, Vancouver 
Quebec P. T. LEGARE, LTD., Quebec 




Canadian Farm Implements 




THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPRO VINCI AL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DEVaXED TO THE INTERESTS OF DEALERS IN AND MANTTFACTTTRKRS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES, ENGINES AND MACHINERY 

Establishpd in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLDG. WINNIPEG, CANADA 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
$1.00 per year In Canada: Foreign $1.25 per year 



Single Copies, Ten Cents 



ADVERTISING 
RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this office not later than the 25th of the 
month preceding issue in which insertion is desired. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name. We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 

Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post Office as second class matter. 



mNNIPEG, CANADA, MAECH, 1921 



22 



U.S. Trade Relations 



Reports from Washington deal- 
ing with the general revision of 
the tariff show that great interes't 
is being taken in the matter of 
•tariff revision as connected with 
the farm equipment trade. It is 
realized that changes in tariff 
conditions may have a dual- effect 
— upon Canadian equipment im- 
ported by the United States and 
also as regards Canadian imports 
of farm machinery from that 
country. The trade balance' lies 
with the U.S. 

As we are well aware, Canadian 
■legislators are following tariff 
developments at W a s h i n g t o n 
very closely. At the same time 
there is an insistent demand from 
Western Agriculturists for .a re- 
duction of duties on farm imple- 
ments, or for free entry of farm 
equipment of all kinds. A Wash- 
ington correspondent of Farm 
Implement News, says that this 
demand is based on 'the fact that 
the farmer in Western Canada 
feels that the eradiction of entry 
duty on implements would make 
them available to the farmer at 
lower prices .than similar Cana- 
dian-made machinery. 

In addition, the fact exists tha't 
a very large percentage of farmers 
in Western Canada crossed the 
line from the United States so 
that they have a preference for 
machinery with which they are 
familiar through having used 
specific makes while farming in 
the south. Nevertheless, while 
Canadian manufacturers of farm 
equipment ask for protection so 
that the farm equipment industry 
in the Dominion may have an 
opportunity to develop, many 
manufacturers of machinery in 
the United States are impressing 
strongly upon congress the fact 
that Canadian implements are 
entering the United States duty 
free — and in steadily increasing 
voluine. In effect, they claim 
that Canadian farm equipment 
competition is such that i't re- 
quires attention as regards the 
revision of tariff schedules by the 
U.S. As an example, scythes, 
sickles and hay knives rfiade in 
Canada enter the United States 
duty free, while Canada's import 
tariff on this class of goods is 
20 per cent. Representatives of 
the edge-tool trade in the States 
allege that there should be a 
tariff of 33 1-3 per cent against 
the import of such goods. Cream 
separator manufacturers in the 
.States are also disturbed because 
of the report from Ottawa that it 
is proposed to take cream separ- 
ators, as imported, from the free 
list and place them in the dutiable 
class: 

The whole question, as the 



above mentioned Washington 
correspondent says, is one that 
is delicate and complex. Canada 
is the best customer of the United 
States, yet the manufacturer in 
that country is not viewing with 
equanimity the importation from 
Canada of implement specialties, 
disc harrows, threshers, etc. At 
the same time, alterations in 
tariff conditions on the part of 
either country will naturally have 
a direct effect upon the purchas- 
ing, power of the farmer through 
probable increase in price of com- 
petitive lines in either country 
which enter into competition as 
regards sale. Tariff readjustment 
is too often a factor that aff-ects 
the individual consumer, and at 
present prices, on both sides of 
the line, selling is a hard enoug'h 
proposition without being made 
materially worse. 



Supply and Shipment 

At the present time, when the 
tendency of the dealer is to order 
only when the goods are required, 
there is a possibility of a serious 
situation- arising as regards ship- 
ment in the trade. Even the most 
efficient factory branch or distrib- 
utor cannot ship goods to every- 
body at the same time — be they 
complete implements or repair 
parts. 

The dealer can help out mater- 
ially and at the same time protect 



himself by revising his orders as 
early as possible, allowing dis-. 
tributors to make shipments of 
what is needed from factory 
branch house or transfer point. 
Delay or postponement of ship- 
ping date on individual orders to 
a later period leads to congestion 
in shipping departments so that 
the distributor will fail to make 
proper delivery of the goods you 
actually require. 

It is safe to say that no estab- 
lished concern wants to have i'ts 
dealers take more goods than 
they can handle. But all firms 
are vitally concerned in having 
th eir dealers get in good time 
such m a c hi ne s as they have 
orders for or can place. There 
is a limit to the shipping capacity 
of any firm. In normal years, 
shipments for spring delivery are 
spread over several months. This 
year they will be congested into 
two months or even less, owing 
to present conditions. Ability to 
take care of shipment largely 
devolves upon the dealer owing 
to unavoidable delay in revising 
and releasing orders. Of course, 
if the farmer waits until spring 
worik is ready to commence be- 
fore he finally concludes to pur- 
chase needed equipment he can- 
no't expect to get anything but 
last-minute service. Delay in de- 
livery lies upon his shoulders — 
not upon tho.se of the dealer sell- 
ing the machine. 



March, 1921 



Giving- Repair Service 

While many dealers regard re- 
pair business as a sort of load 
they must carry with Christian 
forbearance, 'the majority of deal- 
ers agree as to the vital necessity 
of carrying repairs so as to assure 
that service upon which depends 
the prestige of their establish- 
ment. 

A good reputation for repair 
service is a factor that means 
much to any retail implement 
establishment, and repair service 
should be developed. Why not 
advertise your repair service, talk 
it, and circularize your trade? It 
is very often inconvenient for the 
farmer to come to town for some 
small repairs, such as a cream 
separator ring, a bearing or a few 
sections. Point out to such men 
that they can use the parcel post 
delivery for such small shipments. 
They can phone in or mail the 
dealer their requirements, and 
should raise no objection to pay- 
ing the necessary mailing cost 
when the time saved them is 
taken in'to' consideration. 

Most dealers are of the opinion 
that repair business will be un- 
usually heavy this year, and it 
should be a good policy for the 
dealer to get in contact with his 
customers, by phone, circular let- 
ter or local advertising, asking 
'them to co-operate with him as 
far as possible so that prompt 
supply of necessary repairs may 
be assured. For some reason the 
Repair Week idea has never been 
boosted in Western Canada as it 
might. A campaign of education 
as to the placing of repair orders 
early is something that would 
save the dealer considerable 
worry and rush work in c6nnec- 
tion with the rather thankless 
task of getting a repair rushed 
from a distributor, possibly 300 
miles away, simply because the 
farmer waited until the last 
moment before he discovered 
that his implement needed the 
part. 



Association Interest Needed 

Implement, tractor, automobile 
and farm equipment dealers find 
occasion now 'to discuss develop- 
ments more than ever before. If 
ever the idea of trade association 
was worth anything, it is to-day, 
and no dealer should stand aloof 
from his trade organization. 
Present market conditions, finan- 
cial tendencies, trade problems 
and many other fea'turQS require 
united effort on the part of deal- 
ers. Only through membership 
in a strong association can' co- 
operative discussion secure re- 
sults. If you. do not belong to 
your association — 'now is the time 
to join it. 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



23 



Personal 



J. Miller is a new dealer in the 
trade at Turtleford. 

Fire loss is reported by 'the 
Central Garage, Regina. 

Wm. Brown is a new automo- 
bile dealer at Rosenfeld. 

The Kamsack Metal Works, 
Kamsack, has been sold out. 

The Derby Garage, Winnipeg, 
has changed hands recently. 

Duncan Tait is 'the name of a 
new harness dealer at Morse. 

T. Sulland has sold out his im- 
plement business at Zealandia. 

J. P. Hagerman is commencing 
an implement business at Regina. 

A. H. Norton has opened an 
automobile business at Starbuck. 

W. Vasey, Deloraine, spent a 
few days in Winnipeg last month. 

W. I. Brown has opened an 
automobile concern at Rosenfeld. 

Wasyl Kobzar has opened a 
farm machinery business at Sarto. 

M. Phillips, a harness dealer at 
Sedley, has discontinued business. 

F. W. Ruth has opened a farm 
machinery business at Mentham. 

C. M. Brown, implement man, 
is quitting the business a't Bel- 
mont. 

A. N. Phizaenlea is the name of 
a new implement man at Salt- 
coats. 

J. Prokopetz has discontinued 
his implement business at Ham- 
pton. 

J. Dotten reports a fire loss in 
his implement business at Amar- 
anth. 

Robertson & Co. have sold out 
their harness business at Rock- 
haven. 

- W. H. Code has opened an im- 
plement and oil business at Flax- 
combe. 

C. R. Harms has opened a trac- 
tor, and auto repair business at 
Altona. 

Thompson Bros., hardware and 
harness dealers at Waiting Lake, 
have sold out. 

H. M. Clements has closed his 
tire and accessory business at 
Prince Albert. 

W. A. Barr, implement man" at 
Oak River, paid a visit 'to Winni- 
peg recently. 

A change in ownership of the 
City Garage, Brandon, is re- 
ported. 

Francis Vaughan has commen- 
ced in the harness business at 
Elnora. ' 

G. Spenst reports business good 
in his auto and accessory business 
at Gretna. 

_ B. Thompson is the lates't addi- 
tion to 'the implement fraternity 
at Si 1 ton. 



J. McWhinney is a new dealer 
in the implement business at 
Turtleford. 

The Gillespie-Mansell Motor 
Co. has been incorporated at 
Saskatoon. 

F. Boyne has opened an acces- 
sory and tire repair concern at 
Stoughton. 

A. J. Shettler, harness dealer 
a't Semans, has sold out to F. 
Fuineaux. 

Partnership has been registered 
in the Canada Carriage Works, 
Winnipeg. 

Robert Coulthard has opened a 
farm machinery warehouse a't 
Mather. 

R. Konra'd Jr. has commenced 
in the farm machinery business 
at Kendal. 

Thos. Sullard has sold out his 
auto business at Zealandia to J. 
B. Cronin. 

P. J. \A^oods, a dealer at ,Ar- 
borg, visited Winnipeg early in 
the month. 

W. G. Montgomery, implement 
man at Minto, has sold out to 
A. B. Hatch. 

R. Bestwitherick has added im- 
plement lines 'to his garage busi- 
ness at Sidney. 

F. M. Thompson, accessory 
dealer at Bassano, has sold out to 
Mace & Warner. 



Mann Bros, are the latest addi- 
tion to the farm machinery busi- 
ness at Yorkton. 

The West End Garage has been 
opened in St. James, a suburb of 
Winnipeg. 

M. Matechuck, an implement 
dealer a't Verigin, is applying for 
an extension. 

L. Skinner, a dealer at Car- 
berry, visited the Winnipeg trade 
during bonspiel. 

Partnership is registered in the 
firm of White & McDonald, deal- 
ers at Boissevain. 

R. Du Plessis, of Dufros't, has 
discontinued his implement busi- 
ness in that centre. 

J. Sailor, a harness dealer at 
Drumheller, is discontinuing busi- 
ness in that town. 

We regret to note the death 
of W. J. Cone, an implement 
dealer at Dinsmore. 

H. B. Whitney, a dealer at 
Crandall has sold his implement 
business to J. Quinn. 

Partnership was registered at 
Winnipeg last week in Hall's 
Auto Lock Company. 

The Carbon Garage & Supply 
Co., Carbon, has discontinued 
business in that town. 

J. Elliott, Elgin, is reported to 
be discontinuing his implement 
business in that town. 



Stimulate the 
Buying Spirit 




HE dealer who is a real business man can 
rise to the emergency of the hour. 
There never was a time when conditions 
were such that a real salesman could not sell the 
farmer what he needs. 

^ Whenever you talk to a farmer, tell him of the 
sales you made yesterday and of the sales you 
made last week. Impress him with the fact 
that other men are buying. Talk of the farmers 
who have bought, and of those who intend 
buying. 

^ The buying spirit grows as each individual wakes 
to the fact that others are buying, adding to 
their equipment, getting in shape for profitable 
production in 1921. The buying spirit is won- 
derfully contagious. Get it started in your com- 
munity. It is the tonic that business requires. 
Banish gloom and pessimism; be cheerful, go 
ahead. Go out and find the people— and sell 
what they want. Confidence begets business. 
Pessimism strangles it. 



Partnership has been dissolved 
in the Gull Lake Vulcanizing 
Works, Gull Lake. 

A. J. Shettler is reported as 
having sold out his implement 
business at Semans. 

J. H. Walls, implement dealer 
at Strathmore, has sold out his 
business in that town. 

C. Toews, an implement dealer 
at Stuartburn, has moved his 
business to Steinbach. 

A. Wolanski, blacksmith and 
implement dealer, has moved his 
business from Tolstoi. 

Prossers Garage is the name 
of a new automobile concern now 
operating at Mervin. 

P. W. McCabe, harness dealer 
a't Rosetown, has sold out at that 
point to C. S. Higgins. 

The Brantford Roofing Co. 
have been granted a license to do 
business in Manitoba. 

Fast & Co., auto dealers at 
Otterbourne, have sold out in that 
centre to J. Petrowski. 

A. Laufensweiler, implement 
dealer at Ridgville. paid a visit 
to Winnipeg recently. 

Partnership was registered re- 
cently in the Auto & Carriage 
Painting Co., Winnipeg. 

L. Warren, auto dealer at 
Davidson, has sold out his inter- 
ests to A. H. Archibald. 

We regret to note the death 
of Hugh L. Bowen, of the Ed- 
monton Thresher Co. Ltd. 

Stock of the Guilbault Model 
Works, Fannystelle, have sold 
out their stock by tender. 

The City Garage and Machine 
Shop, at Woodrow. has been sold 
out to J,. L. and S. J. Cox. 

The North Star Drilling Co.. 
Regina, have increased their capi- 
tal from $50,000 to $100,000. 

Bennett & Lamont have dis- 
solved partnership in their imple- 
ment business at Moosomin. 

Postur & Hunt, garage owners 
at Jansen, have sold out their 
business to F. W. Schroeder. 

It is reported that the firm of 
McLean & McKay, at Strathclair. 
are succeeded by M. McLean. 

H. S. Williams has' bought out 
the business of Frazier & Burke, 
implement dealers at Alliance. 

A. Kapell has bought out the 
implement business at Windthorst 
formerly operated by T. Sprague. 

A. B. Hatch, Lauder, has sold 
out his implement store in that 
town and has moved to Minto. 

M. Wryzokowski, Beausejour, 
visited the Avholesale concerns in 
Winnipeg the middle of February. 

H. B.. Hartley, implement deal- 
er at Lampman, has added a 
garage to his business at that 
point. 



24 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



The American Auto Fainting 
Co. is the name of a new concern 
recently incorporated at Winni- 
peg- 

Martin F. Rauckman, auto and 
implement dealer at Viscount, has 
sold out to a firm named Rabe & 
Tago. 

It is reported that F. W. Buth, 
implement dealer at Westerham, 
is opening a branch in a near-by 
town. 

J. Creighton, auto repair and 
accessory dealer at Portage la 
Prairie, has sold out to Hills & 
Webb. 

M. Peterson, a harness dealer 
at Leslie, suffered fire loss in his 
business the latter part of Feb- 
ruary. 

Cruickshank & Hess, hardware 
and implement dealers at Bal- 
carres, have sold out to Decker 
& Hess. 

R. R. Zachary, an implement 
and automobile dealer at Bashaw, 
suffered considerable loss by fire 
recently. 

G. C. Felske, an implement 
dealer at Nokomis, has sold out 
his interests to a dealer named 
H. D. Fitch. 

J. Wishart, battery expert at 
Lethbridge, has 'taken over the 
battery business of D. S. Wil- 
liams & Co. 

Coughlin & Marvin have dis- 
solved partnership in their auto 
business at Mather. Mr. Marvin 
continues. 

H. H. Carrol has sold out his 
implement business at Dewar 
Lake to Kurtz & Wallace, of 
Indian Head. 

James Phillips, implement and 
" automobile dealer at Carbon is 
reported to be advertising his 
business for sale. 

A. T. Anderson, manager of the 
Standard Fanning Mill Co., Win- 
nipeg reports a distinct improve- 
ment in business. 

E. R Brandon has opened a 
harness business at Lauder, 
Avhere he bought out the interests 
of A. B. Hatch. 

The W. Eddie Co., AVinnipeg, 
report a very heavy demand for 
potato planters, sorters and cut- 
ters this spring. 

Partnership has been dissolved 
in the Southey Motor Sales Co. 
A. Reitch will carry on the busi- 
ness in future. 

Fraser & Bain, implement deal- 
ers at Ninga, have dissolved 
partnership. J. Bain now carries 
on the business. 

The Standard Machine Co. 
Ltd., Winnipeg has changed the 
name of the company to the 
Standard Tractor Co. 

Robertson & Cote, automobile 
. flcalers at Rockhaven, have dis- 



solved partnership. J. H. Cote 
continues the business. 

The High River Motor Co.. 
High River owned by McKeage 
& McGinnis, has been broken up, 
the partners dissolving. 

O'Neil & Cannon, implement 
and automobile dealers at Cypress 
River, have dissolved partnership. 
AV. M. O'Neil continues. 

J. AV. Kay, an automobile and 
lumber dealer at Foxwarreu, has 
sold out his lumber business to 
the Monarch Lumber Co. 

McCullough & O'Keefe, hard- 
ware and implement dealers at 
Major, have sold out their busi- 
ness to McKenzie Bros. 

The O'Neill-Rennie Co., Prince 
Albert, auto accessories, has been 
dissolved. W. Rennie will con- 
trol the business in future. 

Norrie & Fawcett, implement 
and automobile distributors at 
Medicine Hat, have opened a 
branch business at A^auxhall. 

Kerr & Thompson, implement 
dealers and garage owners at 
Killarney, are succeeded by one of 
the partners, M. H. Thompson. 

Onett & Mclvor, automobile 
dealers at Beatty, have dissolved 
partnership. H. A. Mclvor now 
has sole control of the business. 

Mains & Son, implement deal- 
ers at Carievale, have dissolved 
partnership. In future the busi- 
ness will be controlled by R. H. 
Mains. 

S. and AA'^ R. Crystal, owners 
of a garage business in Brandon, 
were in AVinnipeg recently, laying 
in spring- stocks of the lines they 
handle. 

D. B. Jones, president and 
manager of the Moose Mountain 
Co. Ltd., distributors of lumber, 
hardware and farm supplies, died 
recently. 

Consolidated Mo 'tors Ltd., 
W i n n i p e g , have applied for 
aiithority to increase the capital 
of the company from $100,000 to 
$250,000. • 

Gordon & Girard, garage 
owners and auto dealers at Bows- 
man River, suffered fire loss on 
their premises 'the latter part of 
February. 

Jos. Neilly, formerly manager 
at Brandon for the Huber Manfg. 
Co., is now connected with the 
Aultman-Taylor Machinery Co., 
at Portage la Prairie. 

J. A. AVillows, cashier of 'the 
International Harvester, Regina 
branch, has been transferred. He 
is succeeded by J. M. Douglas, 
formerly cashier at Estevan. 

The Imperial Oil Co. have in- 
stalled two 60,000 gallon tanks for 
gasoline and kerosene at Arden, 
and have opened a warehouse for 
the sale nf their lines in that town. 



Partnership has been dissolved 
in the implement distributing firm 
of McDonald & McKinnon, Win- 
ni])eg. In futui'e F. N. McDonald 
will have sole control of the busi- 
ness. 

P. J. Grout, manager of the 
Twin City Separator Co., Winni- 
peg, states that business in the 
fanning mill line has improved 
considerably during the past 
month. 

J. AV. Briscoe, John Briscoe & 
J. B. AA^anless have dissolved 
partnership in the Belmont Gar- 
age Co. J. B. Wanless retires, 
the Briscoe brothers continuing 
the business. 

The Retail Merchants Mutual 
Fire Insurance Co., of Saskatoon, 
has placed its business for the 
future Avith the North-AVestern 
Mutual Fire Association, of 
Seattle, AVash. 

At Gleichen, J. H. Walls, im- 
plement and harness dealer has 
sold out to J. O. Bogstie, and 
Hall & Gamble are owners of a 
newly, started automobile and 
garage concern. 

The Winnipeg Oil Co., Calgary 
branch, has changed the name of 
the company to the British Amer- 
ican Oil Co., which concern has 
taken over the interests of the 
Winnipeg concern. 

John Robertson, manager of the 
Winnipeg" branch of Sawyer- 
Massey Co., Ltd., reports a good 
demand for the lines of the com- 
pany, with excellent prospects for 
the coming season. 

G. Coates has started an imple- 
ment and aiitomobile busmess at 
Delia where he has bought out 
the business formerly carried on 
by Mason & Keane. 

AA''e recently had a visit from 
R. C. Rasmussen, Oberon, who is 
dealer at that point for the AVater- 
loo Manfg. Co. and Goold, Shap- 
ley & Muir Ltd. He reports busi- 
ness quiet in the meantime. 

J. H. Beatty, formerly assistant 
manager of the repair department 
of the International Harvester 
Co., at Regina, has been appointed 
repairs manager at the Calgary 
branch of the company. 

MattheAV Kenny, of the firm of 
Kenny & Co., International dealer 
at Stockholm, has gone for a 
three-months' trip to Europe. 
Mr. Kenny reports a very satis- 
factory year with good prospects 
for 1921. 

J. E. Lemay, recently arrived 
from Montreal, and is building a 
60 X 150 fireproof garage at St. 
Norbert, Man. Mr. Lemay states 
that h* will carry a full line of ac- 
cessories, tractors and tractor im- 
plements. 

I. H. Bowman, Regina, and 
R. PI. Bowman, Saskatoon, Avere 



visitors to the Western Canada 
Automotive Equipment Show, 
held in Winnipeg' la.st month. 
Both gentlemen anticipa'te a good 
demand for' accessory lines in the 
coming season. 

R. A. Grout, manager of the 
Minneapolis branch of the Emer- 
son Manufacturing Co., recently 
spent a day or two at the AVinni- 
peg headquarters of the company. 

During last month the follow- 
ing gentlemen visited 'the offices 
of the Twin City Separator Co., 
AVinnipeg: AA^. A. Poison and 
C. A. Poison of the Twin City 
Separator Co., Minneapolis, and 
Messrs. AVilcox and Hawley of 
the EA^erlight Farm Lighting Co., 
Minneapolis. 

John R. Hood, who has been in 
the employment of the Massey- 
,Harris Company for many years, 
died at SAvift Current recently. 
The funeral Avhich was held at 
Oak Lake was largely attended. 
Deceased Avas well .known to 
many dealers in the Canadian 
West. 

R. AValker, manager at Calgary 
for D. Ackland & Son Ltd., spent 
a few days at the head office in 
AA^innipeg recentl3^ Mr. Walker 
has found business very good 
during the Avin'ter months and 
looks forAvard to a heavy demand 
for implement specialty lines 
this spring. 

Mrs. A. Conway, of the Bert 
Conway Estate, Regina, recently 
returned from a business trip to 
Eastern Canada. Mrs. Conway 
visited the head offices of the 
firms she represents at trade 
centres in Quebec and Ontario. 
She has made arrangements for 
shipments of the lines handled by 
the firm during the coming 
season. 

R. Johnston, SaAvyer-Massey 
and Massey-Harris. dealer at Del- 
oraine, spent a Aveek in AA^innipeg 
recently. Mr. Johnston reports 
business quiet in recent months 
but believes that Avhen the buying 
season starts, a normal demand 
Avill be evident. Ample feed has 
reduced the A'olume of feed cutter 
trade this Avinter, he s'tates. 

The following dealers of the 
Sawyer-Massey Company visited 
the AA'^innipeg branch of that 
company during bonspiel : F. T. 
Dawson, Roland; M. Tourney, 
Hamiota ; J. Silts, Pilot Mound; 
E. J. Nattruss, Glenboro ; R. 
McNair, Gladstone ; S. Johnston, 
Cypress River : M. Davidson, 
M i n i t o n a s ; Geo. Kemp, St. 
Agathe ; AV. Chute, Dauphin ; and 
S. Fraser, Mariapolis. 



A^ou can't get Avhat you want by 
Avishing for it, but you can 
usually get it by working for it. 



Mairli, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



25 



#TnKn n^c>r^ tillage tools 

\M XJAXRA M^^K^R HOLDING GREAT RECORDS 




A 14-foot Harrow with Fore Trucks 



The 

Bissell 

Is King of 

Disc 
Harrows 



So compact and effective is this harrow, farmers claim it has 
saved them a second outfit — one man and six horses doing the 
work of two men and eight horses on 8-ft. harrows. It cuts, 
cultivates and pulverizes the surface and will penetrate as deep 
as required. The soil is all cultivated with once over — no centre 
strip left uncut. 

The horses have ample room and the draught 
is light for this width of implement — an 
implement of extraordinary strength and 
durability — equipped complete for six horses 
but is also suitable for operating with 
tractor. The gangs are flexible and are 
not too long to fit the hollows made by 
the engine drive wheels. Easy on the Horses 

AN IMPLEMENT WITH A GREAT REPUTATION 




The Bissell Packer and Mulcher 

Supplementing in its own perfect way tht perfect work of the 
Disk Harrow, the Bissell Packer and Mulcher pulverizes, packs 
and mulches the soil into the consistency of a perfect seed bed. 
The importance of this operation needs no emphasizing to any 
farmer — the Bissell does the job in faultless style. End bearings 
are the full Roller Bearing type. All bearings are self-aligning, 
dust proof and fitted with compression grease cups. 

The seat (at- 
tached to frame 
on the hammock 
p r i n c i pie) is 
several i n c hes 
higher than on 
other packers, 
raising the 
driver above 
dust level. 

Rear sections are held to the ground by double coil springs which 
improve the tillage results. The rear row of wheels can be 
removed by detaching the curved end bracket, avoiding the 
trouble and delay of dismantling the entire implement as with 
other types of packers. Packer wheels are clean, strong and 
finished with a sharp apex. Furnished with long pole or with 
stub and fore truck for use with horses, or with stub pole and 
clevis for direct hitch with tractor. 




The JOHN DEERE LINE offers a COMPLETE COMBINATION for PLOWING and THRESHING 

JOHN DEERE WATERLOO BOY GOODISON 

TRACTOR PLOW KEROSENE TRACTOR THRESHER 

MORE PRACTICAL MORE ECONOMICAL MORE SATISFACTORY 



John Deere Light Draft Gang 

WITH QUICK .DETACHABLE SHARES 




Combined Foot and Hand Lift 

The highest grade wheel plow it is possible to manufacture — augmented with 
the invention of the Q.D. shares, guarantees splendid work and an immense 
saving of time and energy over the old laborious method of changing shares. 
At least 80 per cent of the old time method is saved — a great consideration in 
these days. 

The new Deere Gang has both a foot and hand lift. Either one or both can 
be used. With the auxiliary hand lever, even a small boy can handle . the 
gang under all conditions. 

The lever folds over on the frame out of the way when not in use and does 
not interfere with the operation of the foot-lift in any manner. 
Get full illustrated details of this wonderful plow and reap for yourself some- 
thing of the great reputation it has earned for its manufacturers. 



The "Hoover" Potato Planter 

WITH AUTOMATIC SEED CONTROL— SIGHT FEED 

This is a FIRST-SIGHT SELLER on the floor of any implement dealer. Its 
mechanical principles and construction create confidence at once, while its 
attractive appearance and general utility points make it irresistible. It is 
absolutely automatic in controlling the amount of seed in the picking chamber. 
When the operator is on the seat at the rear he commands a perfect view of 
the whole planting operation. 




It is of unusually light draft by reason of the wide concave tires on the 
wheels, the roller bearings which are used at all principal points and the 
small quantity of seed in the picking chamber — possible only by the AUTO- 
MATIC SEED CONTROL. This is now an absolute necessity to the potato 
grower who is growing the tubers for profit. It is an implement that does 
absolutely perfect work and has made big money for every grower who has 
used it. 



John Deere Plow Company, Limited 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



LETHBRIDGE 



26 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 192l 



Why Farm Machine Prices Remain High 

By Arnold P. Yerkes 



When prices of farm products 
and some other commodities be- 
gan to fall a few months ago, 
many people jumped at the con- 
clusion that prices of all com- 
modities were going to come 
down. It is only natural that 
farmers who have seen the prices 
of their crops and products tum- 
ble from the high level which pre- 
vailed during the firs't half of 1920 
to points almost as low, in some 
cases even lower, than those 
which prevailed before the war, 
should think- it only reasonable 
that prices on the commodities 
which they must buy should de- 
crease in the same proportion. 

Prices of a number of com- 
modities which farmers buy have 
already fallen considerably, while 
others, including farm machinery, 
have decreased only 'to a slight 
extent. The farmer wants to 
know the rea'son for this, and the 
implement dealer should make it 
his business to inform his cus- 
tomers on this very point. 

There is an old saying, prob- 
ably based largely on the Biblical 
story of the servants who re- 



ceived different numbers of tal- 
ents, which states that "Little is 
expected from him to whom little 
hath been given." 

This applies fairly well to the 
implement business — the prices of 
farm machines did not increase in 
proportion to most other com- 
modities, and it cannot be ex- 
pected, therefore, that the de- 
crease can be as large now that 
the readjustment period has set 
in. 

In the first place, the farm im- 
plement business is an old, well 
established industry in which 
keen competition for years has 
brought about economical, pro- 
duction and a low margin of 
profit, both for the manufacturer 
and implement dealer. The busi- 
ness is somewhat more stable 
than many others, the fluctua- 
tions in volume being less violent 
and far reaching than in many 
lines. Furthermore, it was one 
of the industries which was put 
under government control early 
in the war, thus making it im- 
possible for the manufacturers 
and dealers to increase prices ex- 



orbitantly even had there been 
any inclination to do so. on their 
part. 

Official figures issued by the 
U.S. Federal Trade Commission 
and the Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics show that the increase in 
prices of farm machines during 
the period from 1914 to 1920 was 
only 78 per cent, while house 
furnishing goods increased 272 
per cent, clothing 258 per cent, 
building materials 244 per cent, 
and show similarly high figures 
for other commodities. 

Advances Were Essential 

When a commodity has in- 
creased in price from 200 to 300 
per cent there is obviously room 
for a very material reduction and 
yet leave a price much higher 
than the one which prevailed 
before the war. This fact is 
largely responsible for the opin- 
ion, held by many people, that 
farm machine prices have not 
been reduced in proportion to 
other commodities. The reason 
is simply 'this — the prices on farm 
machines were increased very 
little as compared with many 
commodities and such increases 
as were made were absolutely 
necessary to permit the manu- 



facturers and dealers to remain 
in business. There is every in- 
dication that the increases in the 
prices of some commodities were 
more than were absolutely neces- 
sary, and it is only na'tural that 
under present conditions consid- 
erable reductions can be made in 
these prices. 

Decline in Raw Materials 

Another fact which makes it 
possible for manufacturers and 
dealers to reduce prices on many 
commodities is the decline in the 
prices of raw materials from 
which goods are made. For ex- 
ample, the prices for wool, cotton, 
hides, etc., have fallen consider- 
ably and 'the manufacturers of 
clothing and leather goods can 
buy the materials with which to 
replace their present stock at 
prices considerably below that 
paid for the goods which they 
manufactured during the past 
few months. 

Steel and Iron Still High 

The implement manufacturer, 
however, is faced with an alto- 
gether different situation. The 
prices on his raw materials have 
declined very little, if at all, nor 
is there any prospect of such de- 
clines taking place for some time 




SPEED UP YOUR SALES— AND LOWER 
YOUR OVERHEAD EXPENSE 

This year, more than ever, it is important that the dealer handles goods that MOVE. 
Quick turnover, lines that sell the year around, are what you want to assure business. On 
this basis G.S.M. Lines are a real opporftunity for you. 

The "Beaver" Tractor, "Ideal" Windmills, "Maple Leaf" Grinders, "Ideal" Kerosene 
Engines, Concrete Mixers, Steel Saw Frames, Power and Hand Pumps, Pumping Equip- 
ment, Steel Tanks. We also handle Plows, Threshers, etc. 

Type ^*K^^ Brantf ord Kerosene Engines 

Solve the Farmer's Help Problem 

Three Sizes: 2, 4, 7 H.P. Adaptable, reliable power for every farm Job. A better 

engine at a price tliat meets any competition. Simple design; easily operated; Uses the' 

cheapest fuel. Speed changing device; governor; magneto ignition. Fuel tank built into 

engine base. Let us show you how a Brantford on the floor will put new life into your, 
engine business. 



" Maple Leaf" Grinders Are 
In Big Demand 

Sizes: 6 to IS-inch Plates 

Their reputation for quality work and big capacity 
is such that they sell easier than any other line. Have 
•nd-thrust ball bearings; ample shaft bearings; flexible 
plates; adjustable shake. Built to give smooth, even 
running e\(en at the highest spe;eds. Get a sample on 
the floor and deimonstrate their capacity to your 
customers. 



Double-Geared " Ideal " 
Pumping Windmills 

The best pumping outfit, dollar for dollar, on thet 
market. Few working parts. Wide-faced, special steel 
gearing is fully protected. Holler and ball bearings 
mean operation in the lightest breeze. They automati- 
cally adjust themselves to the wind, governor working 
independent of the brake. "Pull-in" design, automati- 
cally braking, avoids possibility of wrecking. Towers 
are strongly braced and girted every 5 feet. 



The New Beaver 15-30— A Real Power Investment 

Canada's Leader for Haulage or Belt Work 

The 1921 Beaver, with its special 4-cyl. 5x654 motor, is the most efiicient tractor that has ever been built in 
the Dominion. The patented 7-speed friction transmission reduces working parts 15 to 20 per cent. Gives steady, 
resistless power for all haulage work, and 50 H.P. on the belt — a capacity to handle the heaviest threshing. 
Specially designed for kerosene. No carburetor changes required. Smooth clutch action — no jerking, perfect 
control. Heavy frame; extra strong wheels; simple, effective steering device. A real, all-purpose, one-man 
tractor. 

No duty — no exchange — reasonable price. Get our 
attractive sales offer and liberal quantity discount 
to the trade. Don't delay; secure territory NOW. 




Goold Shapley& MuirCo. umited 

Distributing Warehouses: Portage la Prairie, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon 

Factory— Brantford Western Head Office— Regina 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



27 





Have you been Listening 
to the Scarecrow? |/ 

C "Don't order your Binder Twine now," 
wails the scarecrow. " Maybe there won't 
be a good harvest this year." 

C Perhaps, Mr. Dealer, you have been lis- 
tening to the' scarecrow. But even if you 
have, you will agree with us that the Amer- 
ican people are not going to starve next 
year. Wheat will be grown, and when it 
ripens it will need good strong Binder 
Twine — Plymouth Twine — to help har- 
vest it, just as it has every year since the 
coming of the self binder. 

C By placing your order now you safe- 
guard your own and your customer's in- 
terests. 

Plymouth Cordage Co* 

Welland, Canada 

Canadian Distributing Agencies 
W. G. McMahon Hobbs Hdw, Co., Ltd. 

(Representing Lindsay Bros.) Toronto, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 




PLYMOUTH TWINE 



28 



Canadian Farm Implements 



Murch, 1921 



to come. Steel and pig iron, 
which are 'the principal materials 
used in constructing farm ma- 
chines, are in such great demand 
for other industries that their 
prices have remained at the 
highest point which they reached. 
This is accounted for largely by 
the fact that the indus'tries which 
use the bulk of the steel and pig 
iron still require immense sup- 
plies to meet their present de- 
mands, and the steel mills and 
foundries have had a ready mar- 
ket for their entire output at the 
high prices referred to. 

While the amount of metal 
required for farm machines might 
at first glance appear to be con- 
siderable, it actually represents 
a very small fraction of the 
amount required by the railroads, 
building interests, and other large 
users of steel and iron. The im- 
plement manufacturers, therefore. 



are in no position to dictate the 
prices which they will pay for 
their raw materials, inasmuch as 
the tonnage they use represents 
such a small part of the tonnage 
turned out by the steel mills and 
foundries. So long as the de- 
mand for steel and iron continues 
as at present, and the prices re- 
main at their prevailing levels, 
implement manufacturers cannot 
produce farm machines any 
cheaper than those which were 
prodviced a few months ago and 
which are now on the market. 
They are not in the position of 
manufacturers in other lines who 
can sell their present stock and 
replace it with new stock made 
from cheaper material,- and, as 
already pointed out, keen compe- 
tition in the past has forced the 
margin of profit in farm machines, 
both to the manufacturer and 
dealer, down 'to a point where it 



is impossible for any material re- 
ductions to be made without en- 
dangering the safety of their busi- 
ness. 

Beyond Control of Manufacturers 

The fact that the farm imple- 
ment price situation is beyond the 
control of 'the implement manu- 
facturers and the dealers should 
be obvious to every thinking 
farmer — both the manufacturer 
and the dealer realize full well 
that with, high prices for ma- 
chines the volume of sales is 
necessarily reduced, and their 
business would be better if prices 
could be safely reduced and more 
sales made. They realize also 
that their own prosperity depends 
entirely upon the prosperity of 
the farmers, and that the farmers' 
interests are likewise their inter- 
ests. A history of the develop- 
ment of Western Canadian agri- 
culture would be incomplete with- 



out touching upon the tremen- 
dous assistance rendered to the 
pioneers by implement manufac- 
turers and dealers. While their 
interest has been a business one, 
and might even be described as 
a selfish one, it cannot be termed 
short-sighted, either in view of 
past records or of present condi- 
tions, and the manufacturers and 
dealers will welcome the advent 
of lower prices for raw materials, 
and consequent lower prices for 
machines, just as heartily as the 
farmers themselves. 



Board of Customs Dscisicns 



Three, four, five and six-horse 
steel hitches or eveners, per illus- 
tration, declared to be dutiable 
under Item 454, at the rate of 
30 per cent under the general 
'tarifif. 

Hay carriers, per illustrations, 
declared to be dutiable under 
Item 454 at the rate of 30 per 
cent under the general tariff. 



The Twin City 12-20 

The Minneapolis Steel and Ma- 
chinery Co., Minneapolis, re- 
cently issued their new 12-20 
Tractor catalogue. With the de- 
scriptive matter in terse and con- 
vincing language and replete with 
numerous fine photographic re- 
productions of the 12-20, this 
catalog will be a very useful 
booklet for Twin City dealers. 
Sectional views of the construc- 
tion of the tractor are shown, also 
cuts of component parts and field 
scenes are especially noticeable. 
A view of 'the Twin City fac- 
tories, interior shop views, the 
company's, line of Twin City 
threshers and a full list of speci- 
fications of the 12-20 complete a 
very interesting booklet. 



Timken Exhibit at;. Tractor 
Show 



The Timken Roller Bearing, 
Canton, Ohio, had a remarkably 
complete exhibit of 'their product 
at the Columbia Show. Charts 
showed the vital points of the 
tractor to which Timken bearings 
are adapted. An illuminated dis- 
play case contained a set of 
niclded bearings on a plush back- 
ground. On large tables a com- 
plete display of polished bearings 
in a great range of sizes, and a 
number of unassembled parts 
were shown. The company 
showed a very amusing travesty 
film, entitled "Tractoresque" dur- 
ing the show. 



A leader frequently is a driver, 
but he drives himself more than 
another. 



Increase Your Profits by Handling 

Crescent Plow Shares 

Leaders- -In Forge and Furrow 



MADE IN MORE 
THAN 1,200 
PATTERNS 



Crescent Reinforced Shares 
are foremost in quality, 
accuracy of fit and grade of 
materials. Our three-ply, soft 
centre steel and crucible steel 
are rolled exclusively for our 
requirements. Share production 
is our specialty. 




Regular Style. Bolted and Fitted Plow Share. 
Perfect in Fit. Best in Quality. 



THE FIT OF EVERY 
SHARE IS GUARANTEED 
FINEST STEELS ARE USED 



With Crescent Shares you 
have a share to suit practically 
every plow in use. This will 
be a big repair year. You can 
secure excellent business by 
supplying your customers with 
Crescent Shares. 



Demand— Quick Turn-over— Good Net Profits 




Crescent Engine Gang, Shares. Fitted and Bolted. 
Unequalled for Power Outfits. 



Reverse Side of Regular Style Share. Note the Wide 
REINFORCED POINT and WELD. 



Ask D. Ackland & Son, Ltd., for prices and latest lists of Crescent Plow Shares. Size up your demand. 
Lay in a stock to suit the plows in your territory. You will find this a fast-selling line, at a nice margin of profit. 
Get your spring requirements — NOW. 






HAVANA, ILL., U.S.A. 

Sales Agents for Western Canada: 

D. ACKLAND & SON, LIMITED 

WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



29 



Austin Will Sell English 
Tractor in Canada 



Major H. J. Cupper, represen- 
tative of the Austin Motor Co. 
Ltd., Birmingham, England, is at 
present at the Windsor Hotel, 
Montreal, with a view to securing 
a connection in Canada for the 
sale of the well-known Austin 
tractor. It is expected that this 
tractor will cost in the neighbor- 
hood of $2,000 in Canada. Major 
Cupper is also showing the line 
of touring, coupe and landaulet 
cars as manufactured by his com- 
pany. 

In the Austin tractor the front 
wheel flanges can be removed and 
fitted with road-hauling rubber 
pads for road haulage. Spuds 
and flanges can be fitted for work 
on the land. The main features 
claimed by its makers for this 
English-made tractor are: Light 
weight, two tracks, pivoted front 
axle, spring mounting, enclosed 
gearing and simple control. Low 
fuel consumption is a feature in 
the motor of the Austin. 

The Austin has capacity for 



plowing three furrows six inches 
deep in average soil. It is sold 
in very large numbers in Great 
Britain and is used by British 
farmers for all agricultural work. 
Two binders can be handled in 
harvesting. The patented spring 
pivot allows the front wheels to 
adapt themselves to the most un- 
even ground. Some of the lead- 
ing specifications are : 

Engine, 4-cylinder, 3^x5-inch 
stroke, cast en bloc, developing 
25 h.p. (British rating), Engine 
starts on gasoline and operates on 
kerosene. Air cleaner and ex- 
haust heated vaporizer are regu- 
lar equipment. Ignition is by 
high tension magneto. 

Cooling is by the- thermo- 
syphon system. Large radiator 
and gear driven fan. A gear 
wheel pump supplies oil tb the 
main bearings, crankshaft and 
crank pins. Transmission is by 
a . cone clutch, by bevel gear to 
the belt pulley shaft and thence 
through gearbox and spurs 'to the 
dififerential. Speeds : Forward, 
and 4^ m.p.h. ; reverse, 2 
m.p.h. On low gear with kero- 



sene, the tractor maintains a pull 
of 2,500 lbs. On the road it will 
haul a load of four British tons 
(8,960 lbs.) at 5 m.p.m. A 20-inch 
belt pulley is provided and all 
kinds of machinery can be oper- 
ated up to a 54-inch thresher. 

The wheelbase is 5 ft. 8 ins. 
Wid'th overall, 5 ft. 1 in. Length, 
9 ft. 2 ins. Front wheels, 30x6 
ins. ; rear wheels, 42x10 ins. 
Weight, fully equipped, 3,136 
pounds. The Austin turns in a 
24-foot circle. For its design and 
efficiency it has been awarded, 
since 1919, eleven silver and gold 
medals at agricultural shows, a 



money prize in India, and first 
place in the 1920 trials at Bour- 
ges, France. The company re- 
port that orders for 3,500 Austin 
tractors had been placed by Brit- 
ish jobbers for 1921, delivery be- 
fore the latter part of January, 



Williams at Fargo 



W. H. Williams, manager of 
the U.S. Tractor and Machine 
Co., Minneapolis, spent three 
days at the recent convention of 
implement dealers held at Fargo.- 
He reports that his firm have not 
yet entered Western Canada. 



Magneto Repairs and Replacements 



We carry in stock at all times BOSCH, BERLING, DIXIE 
and K-W Magnetos. 

Over 500,000 repair parts for all systems, and $20,000 
worth of special equipment enable us to give a 24-hour 
repair service on all makes and a real guarantee with 
each repair. 

Send for catalog to-day. 

Special terms to dealers. 




Acme Magneto & Electrical Co. Ltd. 

148 PRINCESS ST. : WINNIPEG, MAN. 

r/ic Foremost Electrical Repair Shop in Canada 




With Heider Tractors, 12-20 and 9-16 H.P, 

Your Customers Can Cut the Cost of Production 

Heider Tractors are the solution of lowering the cost of agricultural production. They are a 
proven success where plowing is hardest — assuring a big saving in time and money in all field 
and belt work. No gears to strip — 15 to 20 per cent fewer parts. The 7-speed friction drive takes 
the power direct from motor fly-wheel. No transmission power loss; no gear troubles. Complete 
control with one lever for both tractor and belt work. Engine uses gasoline or kerosene without 
carburetor changes. The Heider sells and stays sold. Your profits are not absorbed by con- 
tinuous service demands. 

"Rock Island" Tractor Plows and Discs 

Nos. 9 and 12 Tractor Plows work perfectly with any tractor. 
Have famous CTX moldboard. Furrow wheel lift. 2, 3 
or 4 bottoms. 

No. 38 Tractor Disc is a money-maker for the tractor 
dealer. Gangs work independently. All levers operate 
from tractor. 8 and 10-ft. sizes. 



"Waterloo" Champion Separators 

20x36, 24x36, 24x32, 28x42, 33 x52, 36x56, 40x62 

For over 60 years Waterloo Threshers have been Canada's standard of quality. A range of sizes for every demand 
Smaller sizes are just what you want to sell with your tractors. Guaranteed grain savers, they give clean 
speedy and efficient threshing. Easily driven. Equipped complete with Wind Stacker, Feeder, Wagon Loader and 
Register. Get the latest catalogs. 



"Waterloo" 
Steam 
Engines 

Made in 16, 18, 22 
and 25 H. P. Sizes 



Built to the highest steam 
engine ering standards. 
High pressure boilers. 
ExceptionaJ steam 
capacity. Economical; 
easily fired. Smooth- 
running, flexible power 
for both plowing and 
threshing. Ask for par- 
ticulars of this line. 





"Waterloo"--"Rock'fIsland". -An Agency Worth While 

Write us^for Literature, and our Attractive Sales Plan 

"Waterloo" goods have over 60 years' unequalled reputation behind them. 
The Rock Island Line is the climax of over 65 years' experience in implement 
building. Put those lines back of your business and you assure satisfactory 
volume. Our full line includes: Kerosene Tractors, Plows, Portable and 
Traction Steam Engines, Separators, Wind Stackers, Baggers, etc. 

Waterloo Manufacturing 
Company Limited 

Regina - Portage la Prairie - Saskatoon 

ALBERTA DISTRIBTTTORS : 
UNITED ENGINES & THRESHERS LTD. 

Calgary and Edmonton 



30 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



Rating 
18-25 




'-^the most efficient tractor in America 

The Bates Steel Mule 

EACH season sees a constantly increasing number of Crawler 
Tractor owners in your territory. The Dealer who is able to give 
the customer a Crawler Tractor which will not call for excessive 
service, will be able to take advantage of this trade at a good profit 
for himself and constantly increasing satisfaction to his customers. 



During Spring work when rush work has to be 
done when the ground is soft, the advantages 
of a durable Crawler drive is each year more 
apparent to the farmers who see that a Crawler 
Tractor is equally useful the year around whereas 
a Wheel Tractor is mostly used on Fall plowing. 

The Bates Steel Mule makes new customers 
faster than any other three plow tractor built 
and the Dealer who gets this machine started in 
his territory will be on a permanent and profit- 
able basis for the future, because the demand 



for Crawler Tractors is increasing in every 
territory where many wheel tractors are now in 
use. 

The Bates Steel Mule is the ripened product 
of over eight years building Crawler Tractors. 

Our Dealer discounts are larger than has been 
the average custom heretofore. We want only 
live Dealers but those Dealers who can get the 
Bates contract will make real money. 

Wire or write for proposition. 



atc^ MachinE ^Iraetor Po. 

^ V Established 1883 ■» 



Dept. 3.K 



JOLIET, ILLINOIS 




DOES NOT PACK THE SOIL 



J-71 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



31 



Rating 
15-25 



PP^ TH' BATES 




— the most dependable wheel tractor in America 

The Bates Wheel Tractor 

THE Model "H" Bates Tractor is the product of nearly ten years 
experience in manufacturing quality Tractors. The Model "H" 
is built for the man who wants a light three plow wheel tractor 
and appreciates the big money making advantages of dust proof 
roller bearing construction and high grade tempered steel for 
keeping the Tractor on the job day in and day out. 



For durability and freedom from 
repairs this Bates Tractor probably 
excels every other wheel tractor on the 
American market, today. 

It is light, speedy, and a marvel in power 
when given favorable footing conditions. 

Dealers handling the Bates Tractors 
have the advantage of approaching their 
prospects with both Wheel and Crawler 
machines at a moderate price commen- 
surate with their quality. 

One line of repairs will take care of 
both machines. 



With the exception of the drive wheels, 
the Bates Wheel Tractor contains the 
same high grade construction as does the 
Bates Steel Mule, having the same radi- 
ator, motor, transmission, bearings, etc., 
only drive wheels are used in place of 
Crawlers, and the selling of the Wheel 
Tractor correspondingly reduced. 

Our Dealer discounts on this Wheel 
Tractor are equally as liberal as on the 
Bates Steel Mule for the Dealer who 
can get the Bates Contract 

Wire or write for proposition. 



BaiB^ MachinE#1rflctflr To. 

^•-^ ^ ^ Established 1883 «l» \^ 



Dept. 3.K 



JOLIET, ILLINOIS 



J -71 



32 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



Monitor Stove Company, Ltd., 
is Organized 

To bring true winter comfort 
to the Dominion is the purpose of 
The Monitor Stove Company, 
Ltd., with headquarters at 9 Rich- 
mond Street, Toronto, Ontario, 
which is distributing the Caloric 
Pipeless Furnace. The Caloric is 
the same heating plant that has 
been such a phenomenal success 
in more than 125,000 buildings in 
England and other European 
countries, Alaskd^ and the United 
States ; hundreds of Calorics also 
being' used throughout this coun- 
try. 

Its principle of warming build- 
ings by natural circulation of air 

■iiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiia 

I How is Your Stock of | 

I Bill Heads and | 
I Letter Heads? | 

I Is it running pretty low ? | 

I If so write us and find | 
I out what is most up-to- | 
I date in this line. | 

I We will let you have all | 
I information promptly. | 

I The CTOVEL CO. Ltd. | 

= A Complete Printing Service g 

I Bannatyne Ave. WINNIPEG | 
■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 



is a complete departure from the 
old and wasteful methods of 
heating by radiation. The 
Caloric banishes drudgery and 
discomfort of grates and fire- 
places. 

As its name implies, the Caloric 
has no hea't pipes. The warm air 
rises through the central section 
of the Caloric register to all 
parts of the building; the cool air 
returns through the outer section 
of the register. In 'this way 
constant air circulation is main- 
tained. The basement of the 
building remains cool for the 
storage of perishable foods. 
Whether the home be the modest 
cottag'e of four or five rooms, or 
the larger residence of eight to 
eighteen rooms, the manufactur- 
ers state that the Caloric heats 
the building more uniformly, 
more healthfully and with 1-3 to 



1-2 less fuel than other systems 
require. An average temperature 
of 70 degrees in coldest weather 
is guaranteed by the manufac- 
turers. 

The personnel of The Monitor 
Stove Company, Limited, is as 
follows : C. F. McLain, general 
manager ; J. Marshall Knox, office 
manager ; W. J. Shibley and D. 
W. Mclntyre, sales. Besides 
the headquarters in Toronto, the 
organization has established dis- 
tributing points at Winnipeg, 
Vancouver, Quebec, S't. Johns, 
Cliarlottetown and Saskatoon. 
Among the well-known distribu- 
tors are McLennan & McFeely, 
Vancouver, and P. T. Legare, 
Ltd., Quebec. . 

The Monitor Stove Company, 
Limited, is conducting a nation- 
wide campaign of advertising in 
many of the foremost Canadian 



publications and is prepared to 
furnish detailed informa'tion con- 
cerning its heating system to all 
interested persons, whether pros- 
pective dealers or prospective 
users. 



Gregg Visits West 



J. P. Gregg, northwestern sales 
manager for the Hart-Parr Co.. 
has returned to the head office 
from a tour through Western 
Canada. He found Alberta im- 
proving steadily as to prospects 
for business. Banks are extend- 
ing credit to farmers, who in turn 
are preparing to buy tractors and 
other goods. 



Proposed Resolution at 
Ottawa to Standardize 
Implement Parts 

On February 16th, A. B. Mc- 
Coig (Kent West) proposed a 
resolution at Ottawa to bring in 
a measure to provide for the 
standardization of farm machin- 
ery parts. Following is the text 
of the resolution, which is now 
passed by the House : 

"That from and after the first 
day of November, 1922, all agri- 
cultural implements and farm 
wagons manufactured in Canada 
for use within Canada, shall with 
respect to the following parts, 
namely : Grain Binder Knife Sec- 
tions, Knife Heads and Pitman's, 
Mowing Machine Knife Sections, 
Mowing Machine Knife Heads, 
Mowing Machine Pitman's 
Clamps, Mowing Machine Guards 
and Guard Lediger Plates, Hay 
Rake Teeth, Land Cultivator 
Teeth and Cultivator Points, 
Sprocket Chains — different sizes, 
Plow Points, Plow Sole Plates, 
Plow Clevises, Ensilage Blower 
Pipes, Nuts for Wagon Arms, 
Machine Bolts and Nuts ; be 
made to conform to 'the standards 
prescribed by regulations to be 
made by the -Minister of Agricul- 
ture prior to the first day of No- 
vember 1921, and approved by 
the Governor-General-in-Council ; 
and that further and other regu- 
lations may be made by the Min- 
ister from time 'to time. 

"That from and after the first 
day of November, 1922, no agri- 
cultural implement or farm 
wagon shall be manufactured in 
Canada for use within Canada 
which with respect to the said 
parts fails to comply with the 
regulations 'then in force, and any 
manufacturer of agricultural im- 
plements or farm wagons for use 
within Canada violating these 
provisions or regulations shall in- 
cur a penalty ,of not less than 
$200, and not more than $1,030." 

It isn't the first kiss that 
counts — it's the upkeep. 




DEALERS, DISTRIBUTORS 

At Last You can Secure a 
Proven Safety Hitch— The 

BELCHER TRACTOR 
HITCH 

ABSOLUTELY AUTOMATIC— A 
LOAD CONTROLLER, SAFETY 
HITCH AND SHOCK 
ABSORBER 

STOPS THE TRACTOR 

Breakage of tractor or implement absolutely 
eliminated. Adjustable to the load. Tractor 
stops immediately excess load is encountered. 
The only tractor hitch made with this ex- 
clusive, patented feature. Tested in the field 
— guaranteed to the limit. 

It Does Not Uncouple 
the Tractor from the Load 



Made for all Standard Tractors. Illustra- 
tion shows our Style A for the Titan 10-20 
h.p. It will sell to every Titan owner in 
your territory. Adds years to the life of 
both, tractor and implements ; does away with 
95 per cent of all tractor troubles. Saves all 
excess and breakage strain. We can make 
prompt delivery. Complete literature supplied. 
Order AT ONCE. Handle this profit-maker 
this season. 



Get Prices and Folders 



Write at 
Once to 



FRED. P. BELCHER, 



717 Grain 
Exchange, 



Winnipeg 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER'S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
district. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



33 





Here They Are! 

Watch Hart-Parr Dealers 
in 1921— 



They have a three -plow tractor for the large farm 
and a two-plow for the small farm. 

These tractors are both economical power units — ^fundament- 
ally and practically correct because built by a factory with 
twenty years experience as tractor specialists. 

Our sales contract is an extremely liberal one — discounts 
and territory that enable our dealers to get volume and 
make big profits. 

The Hart-Parr dealer has unequalled factory co-operation in 
sales, service and advertising — a smashing big national cam- 
paign and a rebate of 50 % on the dealer's local advertising. 

Eight thousand owners of Hart-Parr 30s are boosting for 
Hart-Parr dealers. Scores of farmers still own and operate 
Hart-Parrs that are from ten to eighteen years old — more 
prestige for the Hart-Parr dealer. 

Some desirable territory still open for live 
dealers. Write to-day for full particulars 

HART -PARR COMPANY 

Founders of the Tractor Industry 

357 Lawler Street, Charles City, Iowa 



Grab the 
Hart-Parr 
contract — 
if you 
can get it 




Many of the old Hart- 
Parrs that plowed the 
virgin prairies of the 
Northwest are sti.l in 
use today. The great 
grand-daddy of all 
Tractors was old Hart- 
Parr No. 1 , built in 1 901 . 



f^^^ POWERFUL STURDY KEROSENE TRACTORS /^Wg 





FOUNDERS OF TRACTOR INDUSTRY ^ZO^ 



34 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



A Tractor Safety Hitch With 
Novel Features 

A tractor hitch which is a dis- 
tinctly new type in such equip- 
ment is announced by F. P. 
Belcher, 717 Grain Exchange 
Bldg., Winnipeg. A practical 
power farmer who has handled 
tractors for years, Mr. Belcher 
has had his safety hitch under de- 
velopment for over two years. It 
has been thoroughly tested in the 
field, and used with great success 
on the most s'tony and root-bound 
soil. Tests of this hi'tch seen by 
a representative of Canadian 
Farm Implements show that the 
Belcher tractor hitch has wonder- 
ful efficiency in eliminating all 
possibility of strain or breakage 
of both implement and tractor. 

The Belcher tractor is made 
with attachments to suit all lead- 
ing tractors, such as the Titan 
10-20, Case, Waterloo Boy and 
Twin City tractors. The hitches 
are manufactured in Winnipeg, 
under the personal supervision of 
the inventor. 

The Belcher tractor hitch is the 
only tractor hitch that we have 
seen which absorbs all sudden 
shocks or overstrains without 
uncoupling the tractor from the 



load. It functions as an auto- 
matic load controller, safety hitch 
and shock absorber. The clutch 
of the tractor is automatically 
released the instant an overload is 
attempted. The pre-determined 
pull on the drawbar at which 'the 
clutch is released is regulated by 
a hand lever beside the driving 
seat of the tractor. It is adjust- 
able to function at any desired 
pull, from 50 lbs. to maximum 
capacity of the tractor, while the 
tractor is in motion. 

At all times carrying the nor- 
mal load, the strong spring gives 
even, cushioned traction, ' When- 
ever sudden shock or strain is 
met, instantaneously 'the clutch 
automatically releases and the 
tractor stops. Positive operation 
is given regardless of the angle 
of the tractor to the plow or 
other implement, yet the clutch 
cannot be released prematurely. 

The value of such a safety 
hitch to the tractor owner is 
obvious. He loses no time in 
backing-up the tractor and re- 
coupling the load, as with the 
ordinary type of spring hitch. 
Breakage of plows, shares, and 
ben't beams, is eliminated. A very 
great proportion of tractor break- 
ages have been due to overstrain 



through obstructions 'met, or 
overloading. This hitch saves the 
tractor as well as the toof. Delay 
due to frequent s'toppage, fuel 
wastage, heavy repair bills — all 
expensive items for the tractor 
owner — are eradicated by this de- 
vice, which cushions the normal 
load, automatically prevents over- 
, loading, and adds years to the 
life and efficiency of the tractor. 



Gray Tractor Co. in 
New Quarters 



Hart-Parr Catalog 



The Hart-Parr Co., Charles 
City, Iowa, recently issued a new 
folder catalog describing and 
illustrating the Hart-Parr "30". 
This publication is very attrac- 
tively gotten up and gives in a 
clear and concise form the con- 
structional fea'tures and leading 
points in design of the tractor. 
Many illustrations of component 
parts, including the kerosene 
shunt, give an excellent idea of 
the machine. A view of the Hart- 
Parr factory, which covers 22 
acres, and interior views of the 
machine and erecting shops, com- 
plete a catalog which will be of 
great interest to Hart-Parr deal- 
ers and prospective purchasers. 



The Gray Tractor Co. of Can- 
ada, Ltd., Winnipeg, now occupy 
their new premises on Lombard 
street in that city, opposite the 
Grain Exchange. The Gray 
company have a nice one-storey 
brick building, with display space 
for their tractors and ample office 
room. Manager A. Pugh reports 
a good demand for the wide drive 
drum tractors, and cordially in- 
vites dealers visiting the city to 
call upon them at their new ad- 
dress. 



Beaton in West 



J. Beaton, general sales mana- 
ger of the McLaughlin Division 
of General Motors of Canada, 
Oshawa, recently returned east 
following a business trip during 
which he visited Winnipeg, Re- 
gina. Saskatoon, Calgary and 
Vancouver. 

George Ansley, formerly man- 
ager of the McLaughlin head- 
quarters at Montreal, and well 
known to the Western trade, has' 
been appointed assistant general 
sales manager at the head office 
of the company at Oshawa, Ont. 



British 
Built— 
British 
Quality 




LISTER Farm Engines 




Satisfied Customers Follow 
Sales of the ^^LISTER'* Line 

--LISTER Engines Sell the Year Around 

British built, and to the British standard of durability. The best materials and best 
workmanship. High tension ignition — no batteries. Automatic lubrication. Economical 
to run. Shipped complete with skids. Lister engines are what the farmer wants. Sell 
them this spring and make money. 

--LISTER Grinders have Great Capacity 

We guarantee Lister GraiA Grinders to grind more feed on the same power than any 
grinder of the same size on the market. Heavy steel shaft with extra long bearings 
gives durability and rigidity. Ball thrust bearing. Large feed trough; ample screening 
capacity. Strong, reversible plates with worm force feed. All machines are fitted with 
bagger pulley. Sold with or without base. 

--The Complete LISTER Line Includes: 

"Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene Engines, Grain Grinders and Crushers, 
Electric Lighting Plants, "Melotte" and "Lister-Premier" Cream Separators, Milking 
Machines, Churns, Ensilage Cutters, Silos, Sawing Outfits, Pumps, Pump Jacks, Power 
Pumping Outfits, etc. 




Cream Separators 

12 Sizes: Capacities, 280 to 1,300 Lbs. 

We can make immediate delivery of all sizes. The "Melotte" bowl is self- 
balancing and frictionless. Hangs free from a ball-bearing spindle. In con- 
struction and skimming efficiency the "Melotte" is the World's Foremost Separator. 

"LISTER"-the World's Leading Milker 

SIMPLE, RELIABLE, EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL 

Our 1921 model is the last word in milkers. Lister milking machines 
have been in use all over the world for 15 years. Made in single or 
double units. Simple in design. An ordinary 1J4 h.p. engine or motor 
will operate them. The Lister Pulsator gives a perfect release of the 
teats. The cups cannot fall off, and the stroke of the pulsator can be 
altered instantly to suit the individual cow. DEALERS— Send for 
special literature. 

IS YOUR TERRITORY OPEN? IF SO, WRITE AT ONCE 

R. A. LISTER & CO. {Canada) LIMITED 




LISTER Grinders 

Five Sizes. 6 to 12-lnch Plates 




MELOTTE Cream Separators 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 



LISTER Milking Machines 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



35 




Cletrac Dealers Sure of a 

Big Year— 



BECA USE : They're backed up by the strongest advertising campaign 
we have yet put over. It will reach every farmer from Nova Scotia to 
Vancouver Island — ^not once, but many times throughout the year. 

BECAUSE : Cletrac's a sure seller. It works fifty-two weeks in the 
year. Its construction makes it dependable in all weathers. 

BECA USE : Cletrac dealers are real, live salesmen, who have studied 
Cletrac, and know that every progressive farmer is a Cletrac prospect. 

BECAUSE : Our increased production insures they'll have Cletracs 
in plenty to sell this year. 

BECAUSE: The Cletrac proposition provides for a good margin 
of profit. 

Why don't you get in with the Cletrac crew and be in line for a successful 
year? We have an attractive dealer offer which we will be glad to send you. 

Go After Prospects Hard and Get Your Orders in At Once! 

The Cleveland Tractor Company 

Of Canada, Limited 

HOME OFFICE - - 21 Ottawa Street, Montreal 

Western Sales Office - 261 Fort Street, Winnipeg 



EASY ON A TRACK 
THE CLETRAC WAY 

Specifications — 

Horsepower: 12 at draw-bar, 20 

at belt-pulley. 
Length: 96 inches. 
Width: 50 inches. 
Height: 52 inches. 
Weight: 3,455 pounds. 
Turning circle: 12 feet. 
Traction surface: about 800 

square inches. 
Centre to centre of tracks: 38 

inches. 

Belt -pulley: diameter 8 inches, 
face 6 inches. 



The New Phase in Farming 

Farmers are to-day faced with 
lower prices for farm pro- 
ducts. Production costs must 
be reduced. The Canadian 
farmer turns naturally to 
Cletrac. Cletrac cuts the cost 
of crop production to the bone. 
It means better yields and a big, 
sure margin of profit. 



Cletrac 

JANK'TYPE 
TPACTOJL 



36 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



Bates Tractors for 1921 



The Bates Machine & Tractor 
Co., Joliet. 111., announce their 
line of tractors to the trade for 
the coming season. These com- 
prise the Model H Wheel Trac- 
tor, 15-25 h.p. ; the Bates Steel 
Mule, 18-25 h.p.. Model F; and 
the Model G, Bates Steel Mule 
Industrial Tractor, 25-35 h.p., de- 
signed for industrial work ex- 
clusively. 

This well known company has 
been established since 1883 and 
have been manufacturing quality 
machinery ever since. As well as 
agricultural and industrial trac- 
'tors they produce Corliss engines, 
complete power plants, flywheels, 




Bates Steel Mule, Model F, 18-25 H.P. 



Bates Wheel Tractor, Model H, 15-25 H.P. 



general machinery, etc. 

Former models of the Bates' 
tractors have been sold in the 



Canadian West, but this year, 
with greatly increased production 
the company are entering the 



A FAST SELLING 

GREGG 4 or 



LINE FOR YOUR STORE THIS SPRING! 

5-HORSE PLOW EVENERS 



The Best 
Plow Hitch 
Made. 




Order 
Your Stock 
Now. 



Our No. 410 Four -Horse Gang, Sulky and Disc Plow Evener works four horses abreast, one horse in the 
furrow. Perfect distribution of draft; every horse pulls its share. Extra heavy eveners and single-trees. 
Strong malleable castings; straps of high-grade steel. Can be used on any plow with a cross clevis hitch, or any 
flat draft bar for disc plows. With special clevis attachment it is adaptable to any frame or vertical clevis hitch. 

The No. 420 works five horses abreast, one horse in furrow. Ample working room. Heavy construction; 

strongly made of specially selected hardwood. Adaptable to any gang with a cross 

nil clevis hitch. With clevis attachment, fits any gang frame hitch or frame beam gang 
— — — g * ' I design. We'll be glad to supply full details of those profitable spring lines. 

GREGG Wagon Hardware— A Paying Specialty 

We manufacture a full line, comprising Neckyoke Centre Irons, Singletree and 
WhifHetree Ferrules and Hooks, Neckyoke End-vlrons, Wagon Box Straps and Braces, 
Box Rods, Wagon Wrenches, Screw Pin Clevises, etc. 




ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR GREGG 
GOODS — ACCEPT NO OTHERS. 



Our lines led in quality, popularity and demand last year. 
Add to your profits in 1921 by selling Gregg Goods. 



Gregg Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, Man. 



** MacLachlan 

(Patent applied for) 

Wide-Spread Disc 
Harrow Coupler 



4,. '% 



An Attachment 
that every 
Farmer 
requires 



,1 Sole Manufacturers: 

MAGNET METAL & FOUNDRY Co. Ltd. 

WINNIPEG : : CANADA 




Write for 
Prices and 
Particulars 



Western Canadian field in a large 
Avay. They are now appointed 
dealers 'throughout the territory. 
The Bates Steel Mule tractors 
were recently reduced to pre-war 
prices. Following is a brief de- 
scription of the constructional 
fea'tures of Bates tractors'. 

The Bates Wheel Tractors 

The Model "H" Bates Wheel 
Tractor is mounted throughout 
from front wheels to draw bar on 
Tim'ken nickel steel roller bear- 
ings. It is of the back-bone type 
with transmission bolted direct to 
'the motor, and all working parts 
completely enclosed agatnst dust. 
The Bates-Midwest motor devel-- 
opes about thirty-eight horse 
power on the brake at one thous- 
and piston feet. The crankshaft 
is two and one-half inches in 
diameter, and oil is forced 
through i't from thirty-five to fifty 
pounds pressure. 

Plowing speeds of this tractor 
are three and one-half miles per 
hour on high, and two and one- 
third miles per hour on low. 
Tractor is rated at 15 h.p. on the 
draw bar, and 25 h.p. on the belt. 
The weight is 4,000 pounds. 

With the exception of the 
drive > wheels the Bates wheel 
tractor contains the same high- 
grade construction as does the 
Bates Steel Mule, having the 
same radiator, motor, clutch, 
transmission, bearings and etc., 
only drive wheels are used in 
place of crawlers, and the selling 
price of the wheel tractor is cor- 
respondingly reduced. 

Model "F" Crawler Type 

The Model "F" Bates Steel 
Mule is equipped with a Bates- 
Midwest motor, which is de- 
signed for over-load work in very 
dusty conditions. All working 
parts of the motor are big enough 
for a five-inch cylinder and then 
a four and one-eighth-inch cylin- 
der is put on. This prevents the 
farmer overloading his motor. 

The fuel 'tank on the Model 
"F" is hinged at the dash board 
so that it can be raised when 
working at the engine valves. 
The Model "F" Bates Steel Mule 



March, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3: 



also has different turning brakes 
than it's predecessor, the Model 
"D" Bates Steel Mule. The 
braking system is now made so 
the operator can hold either 
crawler perfectly still and pivot 
around it with the other crawler. 

With the exception of the 
motor, turning brakes, water air 
cleaner, carburetor and hinged 
fuel tank, the Model "F" is iden- 
tical with its predecessor, the 
Model "D". No change has been 
made in the crawler construction 
nor in the transmission, clutch, 
etc. 

The rating is changed to 18 
h.p. on the draw bar and to 25 
h.p. on the belt, and the weight 
is changed to 4,850 pounds. A 
platform has been added and a 
few little modifications made to 
make the driver more comfort- 
able. 

All working parts throughout 
are enclosed against dust and 
operate in oil. The front vvheels, 
transmission, belt pulley and 
crawlers all run on nickel steel 
roller bearings. 

Bates Industrial Tractors 

The Model "G" is a heavy 
Bates Steel Mule built for indus- 



Speed Up 
Spring Sales 



A Share for 
Practically Every 
Plow in Use 




trial work exclusively. It is made 
so that a power driven winch can 
be attached to the front end for 
logging and other work. It 
weighs approximately 6,500 
pounds and has a rating of 25 
h.p. on the draw bar and 35 h.p. 
on the belt. 

Like the Model "F" Bates 
Steel Mule, all working parts are 
incased against dust and run in 
oil bath. Wheels, transmission, 
and crawlers are full roller bear- 
ing throughout. The clutch is 
hand operated, dry plate disc type 
and can be operated either from 
driver's seat or platform of 'trac- 
tor. The driver's seat is made 
a swivel so that it can be pushed 
out of the way when driver is 
standing. Hauling speeds are 
two and one-third miles per hour, 
and three and one-half miles per 
hour, and the reverse speed is 
approximately two miles per 
hour. 

The motor has a three-inch 
hollovv- crankshaft and four and 
one-half-inch cylinders. The oil 
pressure carriage is b e 't w e e n 
thirty-five and fifty pounds. The 
Jones Tractor & Implement Co., 
Regina, are distributors for Bates 
tractors. 



Handle the 
''Star'' Line 



Guaranteed Per- 
fect in Quality, 
Fit and Finish 



"STAR" FITTED 
PLOWSHARES 




This will be a big re- 
pair year, with a phe- 
nomenal demand for 
shares. Star shares are 
finished complete with 
bolts ready to attach 
to the plow. Size up 
your needs, and order 
now. 



A reinforced land- 
side on all shares 
strengthens the 
weld. Sell Star and 
you assure repeat 
orders from your 
trade. 




No share sold equals the Star for 
satisfactory service. Make your store Star head- 
quarters for your district. No line assures better de- 
mand or a nicer margin of profit . Made exclu sively by 

Star Manufacturing Co. 

CARPENTERSVILLE, ILL., U.S.A. 



For prompt ship- 
ment write the 
nearest jobber: 

J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co., 
Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary 

Western Implements, Regina 

Wilkinson-Kompass Ltd. 
Winnipeg 

F. G. Wright & Co., Winnipeg 
Metals Ltd., Calgary and Ed- 
monton 

Western Canada Hardware 
Co., Lethbridge 

Ask for the 
latest price lists. 



U.S. Implement and Twine 
Exports 



Figures issued hy the U.S. 
Department of Commerce show 
that the total farm implement ex- 
ports of that country in 1920 were 
$46,277,269, as compared with 
$41,195,494. The increase is at- 
tributed to higher prices. Slight 
declines are shown in exports of 
mowers and reapers and an in- 



crease of $.3,000,000 in exports of 
plows and cultivators. A big in- 
crease is noted, in thresher ex- 
l)orts. 

•The exports of hinder twine for 
the year were 17,292,858 pounds, 
valued at $4,101,886. In 1919 the 
exports were 20,286,256 pounds, 
valued at $4,316,109. 



A slap in the back beats two in 
the face. 




Clean Grain and 
Clean Profits 

Follow the sale of the 

"NEW DUAL 
CLEANER and 
SEPARATOR 

Immense capacity. Does better 
work in less time. Reduces the 
heaviest mixtures in ONE RUN ■ 
at a rate that would require two 
ordinary mills. Cleans and sep- 
arates twice as fast as the best 
fanning mill of the same size ever 
made. 

One Operation Cleans the Dirtiest Mixture 

The double gangs and cut-off system are the secret of New Dual efficiency. Get a 
New Dual on your floor. Prove our claims for yourself. Show the farmers how 
this mill does finished work, in a few minutes, on any combination of dirty grain. 
No middlings — no half-and-half mixtures — but PERFECT SEPARATION of Wheat, 
Barley or Oats. Complete sieve and screen equipment with every mill. To show 
it is to sell it, and the New Dual gives the dealer a better margin of profit than 
the average mill. Let us tell you about it. 

Sellthe Western Pulverizer, Packer 

and Mulcher 

It Guarantees Bigger Yields 

and Earlier Crops 
A Size for Every Farm 

PLOW PACKER— 2 ft. 6 in. two- 
furrow; 4 ft. three-furrow. 

SINGLE SECTION— 4, 6, 8, 10 
and 12 ft. sizes. 

THREE SECTION— 11, 15 and 21 
ft. sizes. 




It saves all 
the moisture 



"Western" Pulverizers have revolutionized agriculture. They are different from 
any other machine on the market. Pulverize, pack and mulch the soil in one opera- 
tion, giving a seed-bed that conserves all available moisture. Wherever used, they 
have given bigger, sturdier yields and earlier harvests. They eliminate loss through 
dry seasons. Get your spring requirements — NOW. 

Dealers : Meet the Demand for — 

Lincoln Smut Cleaners 

Made in Two Sizes 
Order Now 

Sold on a positive guarantee to 
prevent smut. Separate smut 
balls, wild oats, king heads, and 
all light seed from wheat, also 
wild oats and all light seed 
from barley. Grain is thor- 
oughly pickled, dried and elevated 
to wagon box. Automatic 
skimmer an exclusive feature. 
Strong, heavy construction. 
Large, rustless solution tanks. 




The 
Cushman 
Line 
Pays 



Get the Cushman Contract for 1921 

We are exclusive Selling Agents for: Tractors, Light Tractor Plows, Combination 
Threshing Outfits, Engines, Land Roller and Sub-surface Packer, 24x46 Tractor 
Separators, Electric Lighting Plants, "New Superior" Fanning MiUs, Lincoln 
Grinders, Smut and Pickling Machines, Saws, Vacuum Washers, Slflfcn-Flat Lightning 
Conductors, Holland Wild Oat Separators,- Automobile Accessories, etc. 

Ask for Particulars, Prices and Agency Offer 

Cushman Motor Works of Canada, Limited 

Builders of light weight, high grade Gasoline Engines for ail Farm Power Work 



DEPT. C.F., WHYTE AVE. AND VINE ST. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



38 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



Subscribers' 
Information Service 

Under this heading we will reply 
to enquiries from jobbers and 
dealers concerning the location of 
machine manufacturers, where re- 
pair parts may be obtained, etc. 
Endeavor always to give name of 
manufacturer. For immediate re- 
ply, enclose stamped, addressed 
envelope. Send enquiries to In- 
formation Dept., CANADIAN 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, Winnipeg. 



J. M. R. & Co., Alta.— The only' con- 
cern that we know of in the Canadian 
AVest who are handling stubble burners 
is the Agi'ieultural Supply Co., 902 
Union Bank Bldg., Winnipeg. They 
liave a burner that retails for $15.00. 

R. H. G., Man.— The "Perfection" fan- 
ning mill is not being sold in. the Cana- 
dian West. It is manufactured by the 
Johnson & Field Manufacturing Co., 
Racine, Wis. Repairs may be obtained 
from the factory. 

E. & B., Sask. — We regret that we 
cannot locate the repair source for hay 
rake with "Carnegie" stamped on each 
side of frame. This hay rake has tooth 
liolder No. 78, and pawl holder lOR. 
Can any subscriber identify this hay 

T. & I. Co., Sask. — The "Vos's" 
power-driven washing machine is manu- 
factured by the Voss Bros. Manufactur- 
ing Co., Davenport, Iowa. Repairs for 
this line are carried by the J. H. Ash- 
down Hardware Co., Winnipeg. 

W. E. W., Alta. — The disc harrow with 
spool DD186 and box DD18l7, also collar 
DD182, is a type formerly made by the 



American Harrow Company, Detroit. 
Mich. You can get repairs for this har- 
row from Montgomery, Ward & Com- 
pany, Cliicago. 

M. T. Co., Man.— The Whitney tractor 
is made by the AVliitney Tractor Co., 
Upper Sandusky, 0. It it rated at 9-16 
h.p. and is recommended for two 14-in. 
plows. Tractor is foiu'-wheel type; 
drivers are 48 x 10. Motor is two- 
cylinder opposed type, SVs by GYz- 
Final drive is by chain. The Whitney 
weighs 3,000 pounds. Its 1920 price at 
factory was $1,175. 

J. T. W., Alta. — Disc harrow with 
bearings DD182, DD184 and DD185 is 
an American harrow formerly made by 
the American Harrow Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Repairs can be procured from Mont- 
gomery, Ward & Co., Chicago. 

I. K., Alta. — You can obtain repairs 
for Judson engines from the J. F. Mc- 
Kenzie Co., Gait Bldg., Princess St., 
Winnipeg. 

T. H. S., Sask. — The plowshare you 
quote as P2658 is, we believe, incorrect. 
It is P2653. This is a blue share for the 
Massey-Harris "New Idea" plow — 16-in. 
size. You can get replacements by 
writing the Swift Current branch of the 
Massey-Harris Company. 

G. W. G., Sask.— We do not quite get 
the idea of your inquiry. Do you want 
to make a truck with wheels operated 
by sproickets and a chain drive, to be 
operated by hand by either wheel or 
pump action? We know of no firm 
manufacturing such a truck, whieli 
would approximate the idea of a rail- 
way hand car for track use. Send fur- 
ther particulars and we will place you 
in touch with supply sources for the 
chain and gearing you require. 

J. A. M., Alta.— The Port Huron light 
saw-mill is manufactured by the Port 
Huron Engine & Thresher Co., Port 
Huron, Mich. No repairs are carried in 




Farmer Jones 

Convertible "p ^M^C 
Mulcher MT €1.1^1% t^l » 

Truly the greatest jjacker on earth, and wonderful patented features will always 
maintain its superiority. 

ALSO SURFACE AND SUB-SURFACE PACKERS 
All sizes and widths in stock for immediate shipment — 2, 3 and 4-furrow, 10, 12, 15 
and 21-foot widths. Write for full information and place your order early. 




WOOD 
GOODS 

We carry a full 
line of well and 

STAR PLOW SHARES 'Tood'oo'I™ 

We have a complete stock in our warehouse of all makes 

and sizes to fit all plows including: Bradley, Bement, Write for Price 
Canton (P. & O.) Case, Cockshutt, Deere, Defiance, Emer- 
son, Fuller & Johnson (Madison), Grand Detour, Hamilton, l^isi. 
Morrison, MoUne, Oliver, Paris, Reliance (Janesville), Rock 
Island, Rumely, Sattley, Thompson, Tudhope-Anderson, 
Verity. 

F. G. WRIGHT & CO. 



72-74 HENRY AVE. 



WINNIPEG 



the Dominion. Write the makers direct. 

T. & D., Alta.— Part 3305 for a disc 
harrow is from a harrow manufaictured 
by the J. I. Case Plow Works, Eacine, 
Wis. No repairs are carried in Canada. 
Address the J. I. Case Plow Works at 
Racine or Minneapolis, Minn. 

S. M. L., Man.— VBll and VB12 are 
plates for an old Buckeye feed grinder, 
as made by the iBuckeye Feed Mill Co., 
now out of business. You can get repairs 
from Bauer Bros. Co., Springfield, Ohio. 

A. J., Sask. — ^Thimble for disc harrow 
boxing, NH7, is from a La Crosse disc 
harrow. For repairs address the La 
Crosse Plow Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

C. F. T., Sask. — We have no record of 
a machine called the Murkes Thistle 
Eradicator. Are you confusing this with 
the Burch weeder, made by the Burch 
Plow Works at Crestline, 0.? The only 
machine of this type we know of is the 
Rotary Rod Weeder, made by the Ro- 
tary Rod Weeder Mfg. Co. of Cheney, 
Wash. This machine has given good 
results in Southern Alberta. 

L. G. W. Co., Sask. — The Empire 
Cream Separator Company are still in 
business. The head office of the com- 
pany is at Bloomfield, N.J. They also 
have an office in Toronto. The distrib- 
utors of Empire cream separators in 
Western Canada are the Robinson- 
Alamo Co., 140 Princess St., Winnipeg, 
who can supply you with all Empire 
line repairs. They can also supply 
catalogs on the line. 

T. J. W., Sask. — You can obtain re- 
pairs for the No. 2 "Domo" cream separ- 
ator by addressing the Domo Cream 
Separator Co., St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. 

R. McK., Man. — Repairs for K-W 
magnetos are carried in Winnipeg by 
the Acme Magneto & Electrical Supply 
Co., 148 Princess St., Winnipeg. This 
company specialize in repairing all 
makes of magnetos. 

J. G. F., Alta. — You can obtain repairs 
for the "Hero" fanning mill from the 
Twin City Separator Co., Quelch St., 
Winnipeg. 



G. A. W., Alta. — Repairs for the 
"Fosston" fanning mill, also sieves for 
same, can be obtained from the John 
Deere Plow Co., Calgary branch. Repairs 
for all Moline implements, plows, discs 
and seeders are carried by the John 
Watson Manufacturing Co., Chambers 
St., Winnipeg. 

A. E. D., Sask. — The well drill oper- 
ated by a Cushman engine is, we believe, 
the "Improved Powers" drill, manufac- 
tured by the Lisle Mfg. Co., at Clarinda, 
Iowa. This company have a branch 
office in Saskatoon, operating under the 
same name as the parent company. 
Other manufacturing concerns producing 
well drills and equipment are: The On- 
tario Wind Engine & Pump Co., Regina; 
North Star Drilling Co., Regina; Bran- 
don Machine & Implement Works, 
Brandon; Armstrong Manufacturing Co., 
Waterloo, la.; American Well Works, 
Aurora, 111. 

0. W. E. P. Co., Ont.— The windmill 
referred to in editorial, as developed for 
producing electric current, is a type 
manufactured by the Perkins Corp., 
Mishawaka, Ind. The idea of generat- 
ing current from a windmill is not new. 
Many installations of this type are in 
use in England, Holland and Denmark. 

J. H. McC, Man. — You can secure 
repairs for "National" scales from the 
manufacturers, the National Manufac- 
turing Co., Ottawa, Ont. 

K. & S., Ma«.— You can get any re- 
pairs required for a "Kentucky" seed 
drill from the International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Winnipeg. 

H. B. U., Alta. — For information and 
particulars on a line of weed burners, 
address the Agricultural Supply Co., 
902 Union Bank Bldg., Winnipeg. 

R. H. & I. Co., Man. — ^Incubators are 
handled by the following firms: Wood, 
Vallance & Co., Winnipeg; J. H. Ash- 
down Hardware Co., Winnipeg; W. 
Rennie Co., Steele Briggs & Co. and 
J. A. Simmers, Ltd., all of Winnipeg. 



EXPLANATORY 



AS TO 
THE 



Vega "CREAM SEPARATOR 

An extensive and (from a sales point of view) most successful adver- 
tising campaign directed to the consumer has been in operation for 
some time throughout Western Canada. 

It is true that- sales have taken place direct, but only in a few cases 
in which no representing agency was in or near the neighborhood. 

TO DEALERS 

We are anxious to secure an agent at every point of settlement where 
we are not now represented, and the terms of our agency are most 
generous. 

In fact, no live dealer can fail to make big returns from this finely 
constructed, simple and fast-selling dairy machine— second in rank to 
nothing in Cream Separators, from whatever source of origin. 
If you are open to handle the "Vega" and co-operate in this big selling 
campaign, let us hear from you. We will guarantee that the fullest 
publicity covers your district and that commission is paid to agent on 
all sales, whether they come through him or reach us direct. 

Correspondence from all parts of Western 
Canada is cordially invited and complete 
literature will be sent by return mail. 

FORTUNA Cream Separator 



COMPANY LIMITED 

DIRECT FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES 



WINNIPEG 



MANITOBA 



The NorWest 



The Pioneer 
Fanm Journal of 
Western Canada 



Vol.40. No. 4 



February 21, 1921 



Firms Advertising 
Tillage Machinery 

in The Nor' - West Farmer 



T. E. Bissell Co., Ltd. 

Elora, Ont. 

Christiansen Implements. Ltd. 

Winnipeg 

Canadian Oliver Chilled 

Plow Works Saskatoon 

Cushman Motor Works, Ltd. ^ 
Winnipeg 

Cockshutt Plow Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg 

J. L Case T. M. Co. 

Racine, Wis. 

J. L Case Plow Works 

Racine, Wis. 
Canadian Avery Co. 

Winnipeg 

The Dunham Co. 

Berea, Ohio 

John Deere Plow Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg 

Emerson, Brantingham Co. 

Rockford, in. 

Fairbanks-Morse 

Winnipeg 

International Harvester Co. 

Hamilton 

Massey- Harris Co., Ltd. 

Toronto 

Magnet Metal Works 

Winnipeg 

Rock Island Plow Co. 

Rock Island, III. 

Saskatchewan Grain Growers 

Regina 
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg 

United Grain Growers, Ltd. 

Winnipeg 

Waterloo Manufacturing Co. 

Regma, Sask. 

John Watson Mfg. Co. 

Winnipeg 



Selling Seeding Machinery 

Tillage and seeding machinery is now in demand. Farmers 
are sizing up and adding to or replacing their equipment for 
spring work. This year they are buying cautiously. Every 
machine will be sold on its merits, and those implements 
which have the quality that guarantees low operating and 
upkeep cost will be selected. Value has regained its place as 
the greatest selling argument. 

Plows, harrows, drills, packers, etc., are being carefully 
investigated, and thousands of farmers throughout the West 
are gaining their first impressions of the leading lines through 
the advertisements in The Nor' -West Farmer. They are deciding 
now what implements are worth further consideration. 

It means a lot to have the best farmers in your district 
favorably impressed with the quality and value of the machinery 
you sell. Their confidence has been gained for the lines manu- 
factured by the firms listed on this page, and the way has 
been paved for live dealers to secure the business. Your chances 
of making sales this spring will be twice as good if the lines 
you handle are well advertised. 

It pays to keep tah on advertising in The Nor'- 
West Farmer. Subscription, $1.00 per year. 



THE HEAD OF A HEREFORD CHAMPION 

Winnipeg : THE NOR'-WEST FARMER LTD., PUBLISHERS : Canada 



Canadian Farm Implements 



March, 1921 



MADE IN CANADA 



$2,300 

RUGGLeS 

1-Ton 

RAPID DELIVERY 

TRUCKS 

A 
quick 
reliable 
motor 
transportation 
unit 

Made in Canada 




motor truck 

users 
everywhere 

Equipped with standard express body, canopy top, 
pneumatic cord tires, electric lights, electric 
starter and horn, full length running 
boards and rear mud guards 

$2,300 F. O. B. London 



STANDARD MODELS 



RUG6LCS ton Chassis 
Seat and Solid Tires, $2,845 

RUGGLCS ^2 ton Chassis 
Seat and Solid Tires, $3,695 

RUGGL£S 33^ ton Chassis 
Seat and Solid Tires, $4,875 



F. O. B. London 



RUGGLCS 

TRUCKS 



Address all Correspondence to Department 7 



RuGGLEs Motor Truck Co., Ltd., London, Canada 



VOL. XVII., No. 4 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, APRIL, 1921 



8UB8CRIPTION PRICE IN CANADa|^^ '^"^g^ 



National Importance 

of the Farmer 

" While the farmers place in the cornmunity has 
always been important, all classes now recognize, as 
never before, that the national welfare depends on 
increased agricultural production."' 

Manning W. Doherty 

Ontario Minister of Agriculture 

As the pioneer Bank of Western Canada we 
are bankers for the United Grain Growers, 
the United Farmers of Alberta and the Sas- 
katchewan Co-Opera tive Elevator Company. 



454 



UNION BANK OF CANADA 



Head Office 



WINNIPEG 



Reduce Your Fire Cn\° 
Insurance Overhead by wUo\ 

Our Hardware Companies have returned 60% of the premium 
paid (based on board rates) to United States Hardware and Imple- 
ment policy holders since 1908. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK, MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life BIdg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

,„„ PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 

INSURANCE IN FORCE OVER $274,000,000 00 

NET CASH SURPLUS qVER $ 1 900 000 00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOMINION OP CANADA $ 160,000.00 

REFERENCE: BANK OF MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 



Sell WATSON'S HARROWS 




WATSON'S BOSS WOOD HARROWS 

These Harrows are made of seasoned hardwood. Each tooth securely set by two 
rivets. Fitted with malleable draw clevis. They are harrows of correct design. 
Have exclusive features. Easy sellers.* Sizes: 78 Tooth, 14 feet; 102 Tooth 
17 feet; 150 Tooth, 24 feet; 174 Tooth, 30 feet; 222 Tooth, 38 feet. Consider no 
statement that you can get harrows "just as good" as Watson's. There is but 
one Watson. Order it from us. 

WATSON'S All-Steel Diamond Harrows. Made in two weights: 35 and 50 pounds 
per section. Interchangeable on any diamond harrow draw-bar. The best imple- 
ment made for cultivating soil around growing grain. Ask for prices. 




Genuine Moline 
"ACME" Shares 

The original soft centre 
share. Give perfect 
wear. Order your 
stock now. 

Repairs for Monitor" Drills, Moline Plows and 

Moline Disk Harrows— Malidt Wagons and Farm Trucks— National and Mandt 
Manure Spreaders— Moline Engine Gangs— Adriance Binders, Mowers and Rakes. 



Also Repairs For 

Janesville Plows, 
Disc Harrows, etc. 

SEND US YOUR 
REPAIR ORDERS 




311 CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



Ronald-Smith Cultivators 





I ' 

The Best Cultivator on this Continent 

\1 wt\^^ kV<?J^^I^^ CULTIVATION-This means a better seed bed. 
IT WILL NOT CLOG— Just think of it. 

IT HAS A SHEAR THAT WILL DO THE WORK— And a little more. 
It has a frog to support the shear wing with quantity and quality of material that 
enables us to guarantee that it wiU sUnd up to the vsrork you put it at and do that 
work with ease. 

Agencies open' for this machine — Write before it is too late. 

Western Implements Limited 

6TH AVE. & SCARTH ST. - - - REGINA, SASK. 



TO PROTECT 
DEPENDENT ONES 

is the bounden duty of every man, and this is best done by means 
of suitable Life Insurance. Insurance in its most attractive form 
is offered under the Limited Payment Policies issued by the Great- 
West Life. Not only is adequate provision made for dependents but 
the insured is able to provide for his own future as well. 

The cosf — profit returns— and every other feature of this plan 
makes it a most desirable form of Insurance. Ask for the 
leaflet "Common Questions Briefly Answered," giving interesting 
information. 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

DEPT. P 16 " 
HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921^ 



As Sure as Fate! 

€I,In bottom lands or rolling prairies, from 
the iierce heat of Texas to the cool plains 
of Canada — wheat will be grown this year. 

C And wherever grain is grown there will 
be a demand for good, strong, clean-run- 
riing binder twine. Our mills are oper- 
ating- night and day to prepare for the 
demand we know to be as sure as fate. 

CWhy wait until the last minute to file 
your order? 

Plymouth Cordage Co* 

Welland, Canada 

Canadian Distributing Agencies 
W. G. McMahon Hobbs Hdw. Co., Ltd. 

(Representing Lindsay Bros.) Toronto, Ont, 

Witinipeg, Man. 





PLYMOUTH TWINE 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 





Are You Canvassing Thresher Prospects? 

THRESHERMEN and farmers are now checking up on grain acreage 
for the year and analyzing the opportunities for new threshing rigs. 
Are you doing the same ? If not, we suggest that you check up the 
threshermen and farmers in your vicinity who need new machines. 

Farmers this year are going to be more insistent than ever about a real 
job of threshing. 
They will demand: 

Clean threshing; thorough separation; perfect cleaning; 
unequalled saving. 
With a Case Thresher: 

They can thresh grain from the heads clean, by the 
use of the scientifically designed Case cylinder. 
They get thorough separation from the violent agita- 
tion of the Case balanced straw Rack. 
They secure perfect cleaning through the Case ad- 
justable sieves, end shake shoe and full width, 
underblast fan. 

They are finally assured of unequalled saving of grain 
and protected against possible losses that might 
result from faulty thresher adjustment, by the Case 
Grain-Saving Wind Stacker. 
Send us the names of thresher prospects in your vicinity so that we can 
co-operate with you in developing their interest in Case Threshing 
Machines. This will result in sales that will mean more profits to you. 

J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company 

Dept. 0*216 Racine, Wisconsin 

Canadian Branch— J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company, 345-9 Dofferin Street, Toronto, Ontario 




4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Renfrew Cream Separator 

Gets More Cream and Better 
Butter With Less Work 



HOW your customers its great skimming record, its 
simplicity of construction and the ease with which 
it is operated, and they are interested at once. 



It has several exclusive features that make it a "best seller." 
The patented curved wings in the bowl distribute the milk 
in a thin sheet to the discs so that each disc gets an equal 
amount to skim. The wings themselves do more than half 
the skimming, leaving the discs free to do the balance 
to perfection. 

The only separator with a successful interchangeable 
capacity — an important feature to the farmer with a 
growing herd. 

Easy to Fill Easy to Turn Easy to Clean 

Write our nearest branch office for supplies of literature on the Cockshutt — -Frost & 
Wood line. Business this spring is going to come all at once. Are you ready for it? 

COCKSHUTT PLOW COMPANY LIMITED 




WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



SAWYER-MASSEY CO. 

Tractors ; Threshers : Road Machinery 



Comprise a line that will help Western Dealers build a local business that will 
endure and increase. From the Sawyer-Massey 20-40 and 25-50 h.p. kerosene- 
burning tractor's to the 11-22 general purpose farm tractor you have a tractor line 
that you can sell with pride, profit and added prestige. 

Sawyer-Massey products are made in Canada for Canadian Trade. Represent 
our line and become identified with a permanently successful tractor and thresher 
business. Write us at once. Your territory may still be open. 

WALLIS TRACTORS 

In good demand from the farmers who require a light-weight, durable 
tractor of proven dependability. Backed by a record of 10 years' perform- 
ance at every type of farm work. Special "U" shaped one-piece steel 
frame. All parts enclosed in dust-proof casing, and run in oil bath. Let 
us send you full particulars. 

A Don't Delay. Write 
for Literature, 
Prices and Agency 
Offer. 





Sawyer-Massey Company Limited 



Head Office and Factories: Hamilton, Ont. 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 



Vol. XVII., No. 4 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, APRIL, 1921 



SUBSCEIPTION PEICE IN CANADA { pgj q^^' 



Per Year. $1.00 
y, 10c 



New Farm Buildings Demand New Equipment 



Building in the United States 
did not slump before the end of 
1916. In Canada it dropped dead 
in the fall of 1914. Our building 
permits for the Dominion were 
$105,264,237 in 1914. In 1915 
they dropped to barely a 'third 
of that amount — and have never 
yet come back to normal. When 
we consider that the building per- 
mits for Canada in 1913 — our last 
normal year — were over 167 mil- 
lion dollars and yet by 1919, had 
only come back to 75 millions, 
in spite of the greatly increased 
cost per building we can readily 
see how pronounced and serious 
the shortage is. 

This is quite as true of the 
rural districts as of the cities. 
Barns are just as scarce as apart- 
ment houses. In every section 
dozens of farmers have postponed 
the erection of a new, or remodel- 
ling of an old barn until such 
time as costs would go down. 

High priced material ; scarcity 
of carpenters, cement men and 
framers ; poor or reduced trans- 
portation service — all these things 
combined to make the farmer 
just as much as his city cousin 
say, "I'm going to wait and rub 
along somehow." 

In 1921 a great number of fac- 
tors have combined together to 
make the demand for new barns 
and other similar buildings par- 
ticularly acute. 

Growing Interest in Live Stock 

During recent years, a prom- 
inent Western agriculturist re- 
marked that his only wonder was 
that the Western farmer did not 
go out of live stock altogether. 
He could make as much or more 
money out of grain, sell his crops, 
shut up everything and go to 
California for the winter on the 
proceeds. 

This situation is reversed now. 
It is necessary to market some 
product which will make use of 
' the cheaper feed and sell for a 
higher price. Thus the lower 
prices for oa'ts, corn or wheat are 
encouraging the breeding of cat- 
tle, raising beef stock, going into 
dairying and other similar activi- 
ties. 

The result naturally will be 
that more and bigger barns will 



By D* ALTON POTTER, Beatty Bros. Limited 



be needed. Livestock must be 
sheltered and kept in reasonable 
comfort if they are to do 'their 
best. Where one farmer did 
much dairying, for instance, when 
grain was way up in price, half 
a dozen will be doing so now. 

Many men will be going into 
livestock more heavily this year, 
in view of the vastly increased 
supply of farm labor which our 
present industrial depression is 
setting free. There is a very 
distinct "back-to-the-farm" ten- 



hibited from shipping milk to the 
City of Montreal. 

All these influences— educating 
here, compelling there, reminding 
this man, and warning another — 
are at work to show farmers the 
folly of "carrying on" with out 
of date, unsanitary, awkward or 
otherwise undesirable barns. 
Is the Rush Coming this Spring? 

From every indication we cer- 
tainly think it is — and coming 
fast ! A conference of technical 
and business newspapermen held 




Interior of a Modern Barn Fitted with Steel Stall Equipment 



dency, now that factory jobs are 
getting precarious. 

Increasing Stringency of 
Regulations 

Another factor which is lead- 
ing hundreds of farmers to con- 
sider very seriously this impor- 
tant matter of building or re- 
modelling is the rapidly increas- 
ing stringency of government 
regulations. All 'the Western 
Provinces now have cream-grad- 
ing laws by which the producer 
of dirty milk of low quality is 
penalized. Government slaughter- 
ing of the tuberculous herds is 
now in full sway in practically 
every province. 

Every city of any size main- 
tains a most rigid inspection of 
the premises in which its milk 
supply is produced. Only a week 
ago, three farmers were ordered 
to put in an efficient ventilation 
system at once or else be pro- 



in Toronto early in October ex- 
pressed the view that Canada and 
the United States would see the 
beginning of the biggest building 
boom in years in the spring. 

Here are a few reasons for this 
belief on our part : 

In December this firm received 
three times as many inquiries 
from farmers intending to build 
or remodel, than we did in Decem- 
ber, 1919. Our inquiries from 
farm paper advertising last fall 
and winter are away ahead of last 
year for half the expenditure of 
money. 

In December we received more 
inquiries for s'teel stable equips 
ment than for the same period 
either 1919 or 1918. In January, 
1921, up to the 24th of the month 
we had received nearly six times 
as many inquiries as in the whole 
month last year; three times as 
many as in the whole month 
1919; twice as many as in Janu- 



ary, 1918, and three 'times as 
many as in January, 1917. 

These are straight barn build- 
ing inquiries sent in by men who 
are thinking of building or re- 
modelling in practically every 
case this year. Nor are these 
mere empty inquiries. We are 
selling these men equipment to 
go in those new and remodelled 
barns, a pretty safe indication 
surely, that a big volume of build- 
ing will be done this coming year. 

Despite a great deal of ill- 
informed talk about dropping 
prices for farm produce, we are 
convinced, from first-hand study 
of the conditions, that last year's 
crop put the average Canadian 
farmer well on his feet financially. 
Much of the grain was marketed 
before prices came down mater- 
ially. Last year's participation 
certificates were not cashed until 
this season, thus putting about 
$48,000,000 into the fafmer's 
pockets from the previous year's 
operations. Moreover, the plenti- 
ful supply of coarse grains has 
made the life easier for the stock- 
man and dairyman, and he, after 
all, is the man who needs barns. 

Building Costs 

The las't few months have 
altered the situation very greatly. 
Had we been writing this last 
August, we should have been 
forced to say that prices were at 
the peak. Looking at the situa- 
tion to-day we should say that 
prices are lower than they will 
be later. The farmer who gets 
on the job early, decides on his 
plan, orders his material and lets 
his contracts, is going to save 
money as compared with the man 
who hangs off and waits. 

A representative of this firm 
was in B.C. recently and was told 
that the mills on the coast were 
selling for $20 per thousand, lum- 
ber which was cut out of logs 
worth $24 per thousand before 
any work was put on them. 

Naturally, such a situation can- 
not last. It is temporary circum- 
stances, brought about by a sud- 
den slump which caught the lum- 
ber mills off their guard. Ordin- 
ary building lumber is now $20 
per thousand less than it was in 
fall. It is probably $10 per thous- 



ti Canadian Farm Implements Apni, 1921 



and, at least, less than it will be 
later on, because as stocks get 
liquidated or get into strong 
hands, prices will naturally rise 
to a profitable level again. 

At present prices the farmer 
gains a lot. For instance, in a 
small barn 30x60 feet, for which 
we supply plans and lumber bill, 
there are approximately 26,000 
feet of lumber — counting joists, 
rafters, purlines, plates, sheeting, 
siding, etc. The gain to the 
farmer as compared to last fall, 
for the lumber alone is $520. 
Quite a considerable saving. 

In that same barn there are 
75 bags of cement. Cement is 
now about 45 cents per bag lower 
than it was last fall — a gain of 
$33.75 more. Paint, locks, nails, 
spikes, corrugated sheets, barn 
door track, stable equipment — 
practically everything is down 
from its peak. Labor is perhaps 
not much cheaper, but it is vastly 



During the second, week in 
March the leading producers of 
binder twine announced their 
prices for the coming season. 
The prices show a reduction of 
one-half cent per pound on all 
lengths. The prices are based 
as they have been for many years 
on the average cost of fibre, 
prices of which have covered a 
wide range during the past ten 
months. 

The factories state that the 
present cost of converting fibre 
into binder twine is the highest 
jever known in the entire history 
of the binder-twine industry. 
This applies not only to the cost 
of the fibre but also in actual 
cents per pound. The cost is 
said to be almost double what it 
was when the U.S. food admin- 
istration allowed the manufac- 
turers a margin of 4 cents in 1918 
and 1919. 

Increased freight rates have 
added to the average cost of the 
fibre delivered to the mills. 
Ocean freights from fibre-grow- 
ing countries remain higii, and 
twine for the Western Canadian 
trade has reflected in its value the 
factors of higher freight rates and 
the rate of exchange on Canadian 
funds. 

Brantford Cordage Co. 

The Brantford Cordage Co., 
Brantford, Ont., issued its twine 
prices for the season on March 
12th. The following are the 
wholesale or cost prices to deal- 
ers on the four Maple-Leaf brands 
of binder twine : Per lb. 

Gilt Edge (650 ft.) 21Kc. 

Gold Leaf (600 ft.) 20>4c. 

Silver Leaf (550 ft.) 18^c. 

Maple Leaf (500 ft.) \7y4c. 



more efficient — which amounts to 
the same thing. 

The conclusion we reach is that 
the wise farmer who needs build- 
ings — and most of them do to 
some extent — will build or re- 
model this spring. For years we 
will not get a better chance. Tak- 
ing an average survey of the 
Dominion, he is more than able 
to afiford it. We do not wish to 
be misunderstood. We are too 
close to the farmer to imagine 
him as rolling in wealth. But, 
on the other hand, it is only good 
business for him to bring his 
buildings up to an efficient level. 

The implement and barn equip- 
ment dealer who also handles 
building material has a great 
opportunity in front of him. Not 
only can he develop a good local 
business in new farm buildings, 
but for such buildings the up-to- 
date farmer requires barn and 
stable equipment of all kinds, 
from ventilators to steel stalls. 



Brantford twine is payable net 
October 1st, 1921. For cash re- 
mitted promptly on arrival of 
goods a straight discount of 5 
per cent will be allowed. Freight 
is allowed to stations in Ontario 
in lots of 300 lbs. and over. The 
usual rebate of J^-cent per pound 
on five tons or over and }^-cent 
per pound on carloads or over is 
allowed. 

Brantford twine prices in 1920 
Avere as follows: Maple Leaf, 
500 feet, 17^ cents; Silver Leaf, 
550 feet, 19% cents; Gold Leaf, 
600 feet, 20^, and Gilt Edge, 650 
feet, 21 j^^ cents. 

International Harvester 

Following is the schedule of 
the International Harvester Com- 
pany of Canada : Per lb. 
Sisal and Standard (500 ft.) 17^c. 
Standard Manila (550 ft.) IS^c. 

Manilla (600 ft.) 20j4c. 

Superior Manila (650 ft.) . . 21>4c. 

The above prices are f.o.b. FoTt 
William, Ont. On orders for 
24,000-pound orders a discount of 
34-cent is allowed, and on 12,000- 
pound orders a discount of y^- 
cent. The cash discount is 5 per 
cent ofif for cash. 

Comparing this with last year's 
quotations, we find the following 
as 1920 prices on twine manufac- 
tured by the International Har- 
vester Company : 

Prices in 1920: Standard,! 17% 
cents per lb. ; Standard Manilla, 
19;^ cents per lb.; Manila, 20% 
cents per lb., and Superior Manila, 
21% cents per lb. This gives a 
reduction of J^-cent per lb. on 
the 1920 price. 

Plymouth Cordage Co. 

The schedule of the Plymouth 
Cordage Company is as follows : 



Per lb. 

Sisal and Standard (500 ft.) 17%c. 

Extra (550 ft.) 18%c. 

Superior (600 ft.) ,. . 20%c. 

Gold Medal (650 ft.) 21%c. 

Above prices are f.o.b. at Fort 
William, with a discount for 
quantity of jE^-cent per pound on 
10,000-pouncl lots and %-cent a 
pound on carload lots. The cash 
discount is 5 per cent. 

Plymouth prices in 1920 were 
as follows: Standard, 17% cents ; 
Extra, 19^ cents; Superior, 20% 
cents; Premax (650 feet), 21% 
cents. This then gives the same 
reductions per pound on 1920 
twine as in the case of the Inter- 
national, as quoted above. 

Prison twine prices in (the U.S. 
are low this year. Wisconsin 
giving Standard at 12 cents per 
lb. and 600 foo't at 15 cents. 
Minnesota state prison make a 
price of 12 cents per lb. on stan- 
dard and sisal and 600 feet at 
15 cents, 650 feet at 16 cents. 
Prison twine cannot be sold in 
Canada. 

U.S. Sales by Bale 

In the United States both the 
International Harvester Co. and 
the Plymouth Cordage Co. have 
put into effect the plan of selling 
binder twine by the bale instead 
of by the pound. On this basis 
the prices per bale for the various 



grades are as follows : 

Sisal (500 ft.) $7.25 

Standard (500 ft.) 7.25 

Standard manila (500 ft.) . . 8.00 

Manila (600 ft.) 8.75 

Superior (650 ft.) 9.25 

Pure manila (650 ft.) 9.75 



Allowance of 6% cents per bale 
on lots of 200 bales, and 12^ 
cents per bale on carloads of 400 
bales or more. 

This change in U.S. territory 
has been made necessary by the 
existence of net-weight twine 
laws in several states. These 
laws require that the price per 
pound shall apply 'to the net 
weight of the twine, 48 pounds 
to the bale, leaving the tare, con- 
sisting of bag and lashings, to be 
covered in some other way if at 
all. There was a choice of two 
solutions — make a charge for the 
net weight at the pound price and 
an extra charge for 'the bag and 
lashings, or sell by the bale. The 
latter was chosen. The result to 
buyer as well as seller is the 
same as it was under the old 
system. The bales weigh 50 
pounds each, including sack and 
lashing. 

The Sisal Market 

Reports state that negotiations 
are pending between 'the govern- 
ment of Mexico and the bankers 
who own a large stock of sisal 
fibre on which money was loaned 
to 'the former sisal monoply — the 
Comision Reguladora, .and taken 
in default of payment. If this 



deal is completed and the Mexi- 
can government buys the im- 
mense stock of fibre owned by 
the bankers, no doubt it will 
undertake to control the sisal 
market in one way or another, 
says Farm Implement News. 
One of its reported plans con- 
templates a big increase in the 
export duty up to two cents a 
pound. This amount would be 
an arbitrary charge against the 
Yucatan shippers of sisal, and of 
course would have to be covered 
by their price for the fibre. There 
is also the possibility of the 
government taking charge of the 
sale of all Mexican sisal through 
another commission, in which 
event competition would be de- 
stroyed. Manufacturers seeiking 
fibre would probably be compel- 
led to accept shipments from the 
bankers' stock until it was ex- 
hausted. 

A report from Mexico City 
says in this connection : 

"The henequen industry, 
centred in Yucatan, is now at a 
very low ebb. The stock on the 
market at Merida has been run- 
ning from three to four cents a 
pound, instead of from 12 to 14 
cents, as it had been during the 
war. It is claimed in Yucatan 
that this condition is caused by a 
surplus of nearly 500,000 bales in 
the hands of the Eric Corporation 
for which 'there is no market. 
The expense of marketing the 
crop has been increased by load- 
ing charges, which, it is claimed, 
are $25 per ton, or a little over 
one cent a pound. 

"The Comision Reguladora has 
been bankrupt for some time, and 
the government is now trying to 
reorganize and refinance it in the 
sum of $15,000,000 to $25,000/)00. 
The object of the new corporation 
will be to carry the accumulated 
stocks in the United States, 
valued at $10,000,000 or more, and 
to carry as large stocks on the 
local market as may be neces- 
sary." 



Tractor Show Facts 



A't the recent tractor show at 
Columbus, Ohio, approximiately 
100,000 square feet of floor space 
was sold. Forty per cent of the 
total attendance of 52,000 classed 
themselves as farmers. 

In all there were 201 firms ex- 
hibiting. The exhibits classified : 
Accessory, 80; tractors, 47; im- 
plements and^ belt-driven ma- 
chinery, 45 ; farm and trade paper 
publishers, 20; mo'tor trucks, 10; 
oils, 10; garden tractors, 9; light- 
ing plants, 3 ; two engineering 
societies and one engineering 
company. 

Most checkered careers lead to 
stripes. 



Lower Twine Prices for 1921 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 



G. B. HOLMES 




General Merchandise and Implements. 

Auto Tires and accessories 
Specializing on advance-RUMELY LINE 

Union mills and Kingsbury, Ind., 

January 24, 192i 

Advance -Rumely Thresher Co., Inc. 
La. Forte, Ind. 

Gentlemen: 

During my first year with the Ruraely contract 
I sold over $78,000 worth of Rumely goods, not to mention 
my increased farm implement sales. For fifteen years 
previous to taking on the Rumely contract I jhiad repre- 
sented a strong competitive line, hut my first Rumely 
year exceeded the total of the previous years' "business 
with the other line. 

I cannot imagine a more profitable and satis- 
factory line than OilPull tractors. Ideal threshers. 
Universal steamers and Rumely trucks. 

Very truly yours 




A Letter From Holmes 



The above letter from Guy 
B. Holmes, Advance- 
Rumely dealer at Kings- 
bury, Indiana, gives a 
glimpse into the possible 
future of any dealer who 
aecures the Rumely con- 
tract this Spring. 

The Rumely contract not 
only brought Holmes $78,- 
000 worth of Rumely busi- 
ness the first year, but 
increased all the other 
branches of his business 
as well. 



There are many latent 
Rumely dealership possi- 
bilities as rich as this in 
many states — perhaps there 
is one in your immediate 
neighborhood. 

Will you grasp such an 
opportunity, or let someone 
else develop it? Read the 
above letter carefully and if 
you would like to build a 
similarly profitable busi- 
ness, have us send you our 
proposition for your con- 
sideration. 



ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER CO., /nc. 
sStea'a^SL LaPorte, Indiana ^.^^-^Sask 

48 Abell Street, Toronto, Ont. 




G. B. HOLMES 





ADVANCE-RUMELY 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



U.S. Firms Lower Prices 



Recent reports from the United 
States show that several large 
farm equipment houses have gone 
to the trade with substantial re- 
ductions. Reductions by the In- 
ternational organization are an- 
nounced elsewhere in this issue. 
The Oliver Chilled Plow Works 
annoimced reductions in the mid- 
dle of January. The reports state 
that it appears probable that 
other manufacturers will follow 
in price readjustments. 

The J. I. Case Plow Works 



Co. announces approximately a 
15 per cent cut on all its products, 
effective immediately. This cut 
will affect tractors, power farm- 
ing implements and tillage tools 
of all kinds. 

President Wallis stated that 
this cut in prices of farm imple- 
ments is no't based upon present 
production costs, but is made to 
meet the popular demand of the 
farmer to-day and to be helpful 
in the readjustment of business. 

Emerson-Brantingham Imple- 
ment Co., Rockford, 111., an- 
nounce a 15 per cent reduction 
on wagons and gears, trucks, 
boxes, vehicles, five models of 
'their tractor plows, hay presses, 
grain drills and attachments. The 
U.S. price of their 12-20 h.p. 
tractor is reduced from $1,700 to 
$1,545. The new price on the 
Model "Q" tractor is $1,000. The 
companies prices on engines have 
been reduced in the U.S. as 
follows: h.p., from $72 to 

$60; 3 h.p., from $105 to $95; 
4 h.p., Type U, from $140 to $120 ; 
4 h.p.. Type N, from $147.50 to 
$125; 6 h.p., from $176 to $155. 
The new price of the 2 h.p.. Type 
U, engine is $62.50. 

The Samson Tractor Co., Janes- 
ville. Wis., announces a 20 per 
cent reduction on their Model M 
tractors, and 10 per " cent on 
power plows and disc harrows. 



B. F. Avery & Sons, Inc., 
Louisville, Ky., announces sub- 
stantial reductions on the follow- 
ing goods : Tractor moldboard 
plows, two-way plows, farm 
wagons, farm trucks, wagon 
boxes, grain drillsj hay pre-sses- 
and ensilage cutters. 

A report on March 14 states 
that the Moline Plow Co. have 
advised 'their dealers in U.S. terri- 
tory of some price readjustment 
in connection with machines, in 
the Moline line. 

The Vulcan Plow Co , Evans- 
ville, Ind., under date of Mar. 18, 
sent out a general letter to dealers, 
says Farm Implement News, 
Chicago, announcing a reduction 
of 20 per cent, in the prices of 
Vulcan plows and repairs, with 
the exception of itractor plows and 
pulverizers and repairs for them. 
This reduction is from the price 
list issued April 29, 1920. 

Bateman & Companies, Inc., 
of New York City are advertising 
a 15 per cent, reduction on all im- 
plements of their make except 
mowers. This reduction applies 
to plows, harrows, rakes and ited- 
ders, cultivators, sprayers, spread- 
ers, fertilizer sowers, potato dig- 
gers, ensilage cutters, corn shel- 
lers and some miscellaneous 
items. The 15 per cent reduction 
applies to the price list of Jan. 1. 

A telegram from S. L. Allen & 
Co., Philadelphia, under date of 
Jan. 25, states ;that the company 
is reducing prices on all Planet, 
Jr., goods from 10 to 15' per cent. 

The Champion Corp., Ham- 
mond, Ind., has revised its price 
list of June 1, 1920, as of Jan. 1, 
1921. The new prices show an 
average reduction of 12.2 per 
cent. In the case of the No. 22 
and 25 planters and the No. 1 and 
No. 6 diggers, the reduction 
amounts to 10 per cent. The No. 
3 digger is reduced 12 per cenit., 
the No. 5 digger 13.3 per cent, and 
the four-row traction sprayer 20 
per cent. A news despatch states 
that the Ford Motor Co. has just 
announced a cut in the price of 
the Fordson .tractor of $165. The 
company is quoted as stating that 
the cut was made possible by 
lower cost of materials. 



-An Automatic Advance 
Coupling 

The Splitdorf Electrical Co. 
have developed an automatic ad- 
vance coupling. . This device is., 
applicable to magnetos - without - 
impulse starters, such as on 
motor cultivators, sniall trucks, 
etc., and mechanically controls 
the spark timing for all varia- 
tions in speed. Its control is 
accurate and scientific — better 
than can be ob'tained by the most 
expert hand, control, =- - 



I.H.C. Reduces Tractor and 
Engine Prices 

The International Harvester 
Co. of Canada has authorized its 
branch houses 'to reduce prices on 
_all. sizes of tractors and engines. 

In Western Canada the present 
prices are as follows : Inter- 
national Titan 10-20, $1,250; In- 
ternational 15-30, $2,640. These 
prices are based on cash, f.o.b. 
Winnipeg. Prices further west 
are slightly higher in keeping 
with the added freight. 

In Eastern Canada the present 
prices are as follows : Inter- 
national 8-16, '$1,235 ; Interna- 
tional Titan 10-20,' $1,260 ; Inter- 
national 15-30, $2,700. These 
prices are based on reasonable 
terms, f.o.b. Hamilton. In the 
extreme east prices are slightly 
higher in keeping with the added 
freight. A substantial reduction 
has been made also on all sizes 
of International Harvester kero- 
sene engines. 



Sell Dairy Equipment 



Falling grain prices are a factor 
that makes the farmer consider 
the value of mixed farming— of 
the steady revenue and satis- 
factory prices that follow the sale 
of dairy products. " The present 
should be a good season for 'the 
trade to promote a demand for 
dairy equipment, to push this line 
and interest their customers in 
modern dairy appliances. 

The necessary equipment for 
dairy farming has found more or 
less demand for some time, and 
this demand is picking up ' as 
spring approaches and the time 
for getting cat'tle on grass draws 
nearer. • Separators have found 
steady demand and also milking 
machines. Barn equipment, also, 
has been in demand along with 
other dairying equipment. 

Much has been said of late 
through the press as to the im- 
portance of dairying at this time 
when grain and hay are cheap 
and dairy products comparatively 
high. Farmers themselves have 
been quick to grasp this situation 
also, and many consider convert- 
ing their farms into some sem; 
blance of a dairy by milking 'all 
the cows i^ossible and getting .rid 
of their 'cheap feed. The dealer 
should; cash in on this interest in 
dairying. 



A Big Shipment of Machinery 

Avery Co., Peoria, 111., made; up 
a trainload shipment of tract6rs, 
threshers and power farming 
machinery, which was shipped to 
Columbus, O., and points ekst, 
the week preceding the National 
TraetoT- Show. 



PUMPS 

AND 

Clothes Reels 

Made in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle piunps for 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys- 
tems. 



SncCESSOBS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(EBtablished 1882) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS' PRICES 




North-West Pump Co. 

T. N. WILLIAMS.ON W. J. MEBBELL 
Phone 607 

19-6th street Brandon, Man. 




or better. That's what 
your customers buy a 
cream separator for — to 
get out ALL 
the butterfat 

that's in their milk. And that 
is the only reason they buy one. 
They don't buy it as an ornament- 
they don't buy it because it skims soma ■ 
cream — but, they buy it to save ALL the 
cream. And hundreds of dairy farmers are 
daily learning that the "Viking" is the only 
machine guaranteed to do Just that. And 
that's why more and more dealers are writ- 
ing for our new dealer proposition, No. 166 

SWEDISH SEPARATOR COMPANY 




April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



De Laval 




The De Laval Milker occupies the same 
position among milkers that the De Laval 
Separator does among separators — head 
and shoulders above all. 

The value of the De Laval Separator 
Agency Contract is appreciated — not alone 
because it enables the dealer to secure the 
lion's share of the separator business, but 
because the De Laval is a leader among 
leaders and, through the friendship which 
it creates, pulls other business to the 
store. 



Think of adding another leader to your 
line as good as the De Laval Separator, 
the sales possibilities of which have not 
been scratched, and the need of which 
among dairymen is as great as the need 
for De Laval Separators; backed by the 
same aggressive sales advertising and 
service which have made De Laval famous. 

If you have not already done so, inquire 
about the De Laval Separator and Milker 
Contracts. 



THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, Ltd. 

MONTREAL PETERBORO WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 

Sooner or later you will sell the 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



10 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Agents, Machinery-Merchants or What ? 



A Letter from "Old-Timer" 



The Editor, "Canadian Farm Imple- 
ments." 

"Dear Sir: — At the present time when 
the volume of business in practically 
ever}' department of the trade is con- 
siderablj' reduced, it is of interest to 
consider for a little the tj'pe of indi- 
vidual who can actually be classed as 
a farm machinery and equipment dealer. 

"In your various issues, which I find 
of great interest and much assistance 
to me in carrying on my business, at 
times there are articles by executives 
which seem to hint at the fact that 
the dealer is, in many instances, lacking 
in energy and aggressiveness in boost- 
ing business and in getting every pos- 
sible order that may exist for his lines 
in the territory which he covers. 

"Now, as a trade we have many 
grievances,, as have most classes of 
merchants. Our grievances, as voiced) at 
association meetings of the Old Inter- 
provincial Association, and of late years 
in the implement and automobile deal- 
ers sections of the Retail Merchants' 
Provincial Associations, are too well 
known to require recapitulation. Our 
trouble has been, and is, to secure a 



Move, clean and grade your erain in ONE oper- 
ation; fill "bins and cars without scoop- 
ing and make more money by asing the 

Liberty Grain Blower 

Elevates 30 feet— 300 to 800 bu. an 
hoar. Only ONE moving part. 6 H. 
P. runs it . One man can move it. 
Costs half price of oldstyle elevator. 
EDCC RAAif illnstrated, tells 
rnCC DUUn hew to increase 
grain profits . Send name for copy— 
B card will do. 

LINK MFC. CO. Dept. 708 
Portage la Prairie^ Man. 




sufficient margin on the goods we sell to 
give the service necessary in the fann 
machinery business, and to come out 
with the money necessary to live de- 
cently and rear and educate our famil- 
ies. We are the last link in the chain 
between factory or jobber and farmer, 
and we take the kicks from both "fore 
and aft." The farmer's jirotests against 
the high price of machinery are levelled 
at us as though we were any deciding 
factor in setting prices. The whole- 
saler or manufacturer too often forgets 
that 'overhead' which is common in his 
own branch of the business is also 
common to the retail implement trade. 
While those of us who follow our costs 
closely have proven that our overhead 
I'uns from 15 to 18 per cent, or more, 
the average wholesaler or manufacturer 
seems to consider that it should be 
far less. I wish it were. 

"But apart from this, let us consider 
for a moment the type of men who 
represent the wholesaler and manufac- 
turer. Firstly, how many of us have 
died possessed of indecent wealth — 
made purely from selling farm mach- 
inery? I have yet to hear of one. And 
how many dealers are in good financial 
condition, able to do business as every 
sane dealer would like to do — to buy 
the goodis outright, sitock them in sea- 
son and finance his own sales. 

"Again, for years the trade has 
suffered from a surplus oif dealers, from 
what may be termed 'over-representa- 
tion.' How many towns are there in 
existence in Western Canada to-day 
with from three to five dealers in busi- 
ness, where there is actually only a vol- 
ume of business that Avould justify the 
carrying on of two implement ware- 



WINNIPEG Jka^^ CALGARY 

lA/RITE US, mentioning tiiis publication, for 
catalogues and prices of the famous 
ALL-STEEL RUTH SELF FEEDER, any of tiie 
six styles of Maytag Wasliing Machines, Oils, 
Belts, Headlights, and all other Threshers' 
Supplies. (rE'^^?c°E~u'^,^I^IVLe^g) Do Not Delay. 



^^Eastlake" Tanks Build Business 



A Type 
for 

Every Farm 
Use 




Durable 
Serviceable 
In Demand 
Everywhere 



Turn Water into Dollars 

Well watered livestock pays in the end by increased weight and better 
quality of meat. A satisfied customer is an asset, and "Eastlake" Tanks 
assure satisfaction. The "Eastlake" Tank line has proven its superiority. 
They have proven their worth. Built without a weak spot. Known every- 
where for quality construction. 

Stock Tanks, House Tanks, Cisterns, Gasoline and Oil Tanks, Wagon 
Tanks, etc. 

Catalogs and Agency Offer Sent on Request 

The Metallic Roofing Co. of Canada, Limited 

Winnipeg 



797 Notre Dame Avenue 



Manufacturers 



houses. Is this altogether the fault of 
men rusliing into the retail trade be- 
cause they thought that therein lies a 
nice, profitable and easy living? It is 
not. As all of us know, both the large 
and small manufacturers want as wide- 
spread representation as they can get. 
One company wants a dealer to sell 
its goods, so as to comjpete locally with 
the competitive line. Another company 
has the same idea, then another, and 
before you know a jerk waiter station 
has enough implement business around 
it to serve a town o;f a thousand popu- 
lation with a wide country district. 

"'Why do men take on the lines?' 
may be asked. I would reply — 'what 
kind of men take on the lines?' There 
are to-dlay hundreds of implement deal- 
ers in business who in energy, ability 
and business aggressiveness would do 
well in any line of merchandising. But 
there are hundreds of men who were 
never intended to be in the implement 
business, and who are; men who lack 
the business and technical experience, 
the ability and the capital. WJiy so, 
and iwho are they? There may be the 
retired farmer, who_ considered' aifter a 
lifetime of paying for implements that 
getting in the game is a sure road to 
wealth. Then there is the livery stable 
man, the garage man, the blacksmith, 
the machinist, the lumber yard man, the 
grain man, the hardware man — oh, any 
old type of man wiho heard the oft-told 
tale of the producing or jobbing con- 
cerns that in the retail implement trade 
lay the road to good and profitable 
business, a sure demand, little worry 
and a pleasant livelihood!. What is 
the result? Obviously, it is over- 
representation and inefficient retail 
merchandising when gauged from the 
standpoint of what a real implement 
and tractor dealer is and should be. 

"Mark you, these men are not neces- 
sarily failures, nor do they go out of 
business rapidly. No, it is usually the 
man who is an implement dealer, and 
nothing else, who falls in the battle. 
Why? Because the other men are, 
more or less, according to their own 
line of business, only 'side-line dealers.' 
They handle implements and farm 
equipment, often tractors, not as a 
major business, but as an added line, in 
which they may make some money, [f 
they don't — well, they have their own 
business to carry them on. What I 
consider, sir, is this: that if a man is 
not solely and earnestly engaged in the 
implement business he cannot size up 
toJ;he real requirements thalt are the 
obligation of a live and up-to-date farm 
machinery dealer. And the fact that 
such men are in business has doubtless 
had a bad effect upon the margins 
which the trade are allowed by their 
supply houses. If a man has several 
irons in the fire he is naturally less 
prone to kick on the commission offered 
than if he depends only upon the sale 
of implements and farm equipment for 
a living, and knows his costs. 

"Will it in the end produce a better 
class of dealer, real farm machinery 
merchants, experts in the techuioal end 
of the game knowing what their com- 
munity requires and the service they 
owe that community, or will it not? 
The man who is blacksmithing, running 
a livery, or selling lumber, and who car- 
ries a line of implements, will assured- 
ly tell John Smith he can sell him a 
plow, when John mentions he needs 
one. Of course, he may have little 
or no stock, few or no repairs, and a 
catalogue or two in some corner, but 
what's the odds — (he is, by virtue of 
liis contract, an 'implement dealer.' 
How many dealers are operating solely 
implement businesses to-day who have 
that class of competition? Eradicate 
it. How? So long as the companies 
must have representation of some kind 
so long will such dealers exist. 

"The best way to solve the problem, 
in my humble opinion, begins not with 
the dealer, but with the wholesaler or ' 
manufacturer. Could not these factors 
in the trade, through their representa- 
tives who place agencies, do all that 
they can, by sizing up the meii, to ap- 
point men who are really qualified' to 
give them good, live, efficient dealer co- 



operation. Would it not be better, in 
terms of volume of business secured to 
have fifty real dealers in a given ter 
ritory than 160 half or quarter time 
men who are simply reprnsenling a 
line because they 'took it on.' I ven- 
ture to suggest that in the end possibly 
fewer but better dealers would mean 
better business not only for the com- 
panies but for the men in the retail 
trade. The weeding out process would 
leave the right class of men, who grant- 
ing adequa)te margins would inakc good. 
I don't mean the men who do business 
in a livery stable or back lot, but real 
dealers — men who stock samples, carry 
repairs, use a prospect list, advertise, 
who a/re located in nice premises on the 
^ain street, who are, in faot, imple- 
ment, tractor and farm machinery deal- 
ers, not curb-^tone and part time 
'agents.' This industry is too big, too 
impojitant, to place its distribution 
through inefficient channels. 

"For example, down the street from 
my store is a blacksmith shop. This 
worthy man is also an implement agent. 
My heart is kindly toward him, for he 
is a good scout ,even though he is mak- 
ing a lot more money than me between 
gas weld'inig. car and tractor repair 
wagon repair and shoeing. I only re- 
gret that I didn't learn to be a black- 
smith, for they, at least, show imple- 
ment dealers what can be done through 
organizaion. 

"The point is: My friend down the 
street has no idea what the over- 
head in his implement business is. If 
he is not too busy sharpening shares at 
50 cents each he'll talk over the sale of 
a ploiw or seeder with the farmer. He'll 
sell him a seeder in fact, and will tell 
him to take the blame thing and set it 
up himself. Again the point is, that 
Jack is a mighty good blacksmith, but 
is not exactly what an implement dealer 
should be. He does not lose any sleep 
over the volume of implement business 
— it's jusit a sidle line with him. 

"As I said, the responsibility for- such 
conditions lies not with the men who 
are agents, but with those they repre- 
sent. Those of us, and we are many, 
who have followed the game from the 
single share to the engine gang, from 
the horse to the gas tractor, believe 
that we can do more business without 
being forced into other classes of busi- 
ness, if only we were not hedged about 
with such selling systems. Tlhis is the 
age of specializajtion in everything — es- 
pecially in farm equipment retailing. It 
has been my lifetime's business. I like 
it — if only I could see where the trade 
is to end, and how. Personally, I hate 
like hell to open a soda fountain on my 
warehouse floor — but I, too, will have to 
take up a side line.' " 

Thanking you for the space, Mr. 
Editor, I am, yours etc., 

"Old-Timer." 



Climate and the Dairy Barn 



The committee on ventila'tion 
of farm buildings of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers 
is making, a study of the proper 
housing conditions for stock in 
different parts of the United 
States and Canada. 

As the cow is the source of 
heat in the dairy barn, it follows 
that the construction and ventila- 
tion of the barns must be different 
in the northern part of North 
America than in the southern to 
maintain the proper temperatures 
and sanitary condition of the air. 

An article under the head .of 
"Climatic Dairy Barns" by W. 
B. Clarkson and C. S. Whitnah 
will be published in a future 
number of the society's journal 
"Agricultural Engineering", 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



11 



I 




I 



A Spectacular Car 

What does this mean 
to you as a Dealer ? 



1 


I 





T means that the new Briscoe will 
almost sell itself on the strength 
of its extraordinary virtues. 



The 1921 Briscoe has beauty, power, 
riding comfort, speed and stamina— yet it 
is economical in every sense. 

Beauty of lines and splendor of finish 
are its first impressive feature. 

The vast reserve power of the 4-cylinder 
Briscoe Motor accomplishes the most spec- 
tacular hill-climbing, or throttles down to 
an effortless crawl in traffic, to dash ahead 
the instant there is an opening. Its gas- 
oline and tire economy is amazing. 

The new Briscoe starts with surprising 
ease, the clutch engages with velvet 
smoothness. The gears shift silently with 
only a touch of the gear lever. And the 
operation of the brakes is so smooth and 
positive that it gives a demonstation of 
perfect control, quickly obvious to a pro- 
spective buyer. 

The use of extra long springs, and soft, 
luxurious upholstering achieves an impresr 
sive riding comfort. 

The 1921 Briscoe proves far beyond any- 
thing expected of a car at so moderate a 
price. 

It is a spectacular car — therefore the 
ideal car — both from the standpoint of 
quick, profitable sales, and dependable 
satisfaction. 



THE 



Canadian Briscoe Motor Company 

LIMITED 

Head Office and Factory - Brockville, Ont. 

Western Service Station, 156 Princess St., Winnipeg, Man. 




I 



WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS: 
F. N. McDonald & Co., 156 Princess St., Winnipeg. 
McKee Motor Company - - Regina Diamond Motor Co. - 
Gillespie & Mansell - - Saskatoon J. R. N. Cooke - - 



Calgary 
Edmonton 



I 



This is the 
Business-builder for You 



This life-sized boy and his big slate with a new and 
interesting little saying on it every other day; it's 
the feature that is producing sales, getting people 
talking and bringing new business to En-ar-co Deal- 
ers all over the country. 

Have you got it? If not, let us tell you about our 
system of supplying it, along with the interesting 
epigrams that make it a real business-getter. 

Use the coupon below at once. Your big season is 
just beginning. You are anxious to make it the best 
you have ever had. The En-ar-co Boy and Slate Sign 
will help you. Tear out and Mail this coupon imme- 
diately to the En-ar-co Branch nearest you, and full 
and free particulars will be forwarded you by return 
mail. 

CANADIAN OIL COMPANIES Limited 

Branches: 

Toronto, London, Montreal, Quebec, St. John, Halifax 
Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary 

COUPON 

TO CANADIAK OIL COMPANIES Limited 

Nearest 
Branch 

Tell me without obligation how I can secure the En-ar-co "Boy and Slate" 
and Epigram Service. 

NAME 

STREET 

POST OFFICE. : PROV. 

I AM IN THE .BUSINESS 

(Indicate kind of Business) C.F.I.4 



12 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



The Development of a Great 
Canadian Business 



From 1847 to 1920 is a long 
time, as years go, in a country- 
like Canada, and "Massey-Harris 
— An Historical Sketch", a new 
book published by this pioneer 
implement concern, is of interest 
to every man in the industry. It 
outlines vividly the beginning of 
the. company and its remarkable 
development until to-day it mar- 



kets its products all over the 
world. 

The Massey implement busi- 
ness began on the farm. Before 
1847, Daniel Massey, a farmer 
near Coburg, Ont., set up a little 
shop to make plows, scufflers and 
sugar kettles. In 1847 he built 
a lit'tle one-story plant at New- 
castle. His son entered the busi- 
ness, and in 1855 became sole 
proprietor, remaining its head 
until his death in 1896. In 1861 



the firm brought out the Woods 
mower, and in 1863 the Woods 
self-ra!ke reaper. 

The Harris side of the com- 
pany started in 1857 when Alan- 
son Harris moved into a little 
shop, at Beamsville, and with five 
men began to manufacture re- 
volving hay rakes. John Harris, 
his son, entered the business in 



opened a branch of their business 
in Winnipeg, and in 1883 at 
Prince Albert. In 1884 'their 
goods were shipped from the 
"end of steel", then at Qu'- 
Appelle, in Red River carts, north 
300 miles to the Prince Albert 
branch. In this year the first 
self-binder that ever worked in 
the Canadian West — a Harris 




Display a Sample 




OIL WAGON TANK 

on our special "Sample Tank" terms and 
you will find it a great help in closing 

sd.les 

EVERY OIL USER 

in your district is a prospective purchaser 
of some Oil carrying or storing equipment. 

UNDERGROUND STORAGE SYSTEMS 
OIL WAGON TANKS 
OIL BARRELS 

are built to meet this demand. 

Western Steel Products Limited 




WINNIPEG 

Man. 



REGINA 

^ Sask. 



CALGARY 

Alta. 



EDMONTON 

Alta. 




1862. In 1872 the firm df A. 
Harris, Son & Co. moved to 
Brantford. The book gives many 
interesting particulars of how 
those pioneer implement makers 
developed mowers, plows, reap- 
ers, root-cutters, corn-shellers, 
etc. 

In 1879 A. Harris, Son & Co. 




Dealers ! Grasp this Opportunity 
for Quick, Clean, Profitable Sales 

We are Clearing our Separator Stock at Special Snap Prices 

"VIKING" 

Cream Separators 

Model A, $35.00 Model B, $45.00 

CASH- Prices are F.O.B. Regina 

Model A (weight about 85 lbs.), has capacity of 200 lbs. per hour. Model B (weight 
about 140 lbs.), has capacity of 400 lbs. per hour. Get a stock. Give your customers the 
biggest separator value on the market at a price that nets you a nice margin of profit. Every 
separator is guaranteed by the manufacturers, the Swedish Separator Co., Chicago, 111. 

Shipment to Manitoba, Saskatchewan or Alberta 
Don*t delay. Get yours while our stock lasts. W] 

The Viking is the easiest-running separator on the market. Thei famous Viking disc skims 
to .003. Easily cleaned and kept clean. Few parts; enclosed gearing; heavy castings. They 
save more butter-fat each year than will pay for their cost. 



DEALERS — You won't have to wait for delivery, 
received. Write or wire your requirements — to-day. 



We will ship the day your order is 



Our line includes: A complete stock of Conway Buggies, Heney Harness and Blankets, 
Ford Commercial Bodies. Catalog and prices on request. 

THE BERT CONWAY ESTATE 

Albert and South Railway St. (Box 33) ^ - REGINA, SASK. 



machine — was tes'ted on a farm 
near Edmonton. 

In 1864 the Massey Works, at 
Newcastle, were burned down but 
were replaced. In 1869 they pro- 
duced the "Ithaca" steel rake, the 
first automatic dump horse rake 
to be built in North America. In 
1870 the business was incorpor- 
ated as the Massey Manufactur- 
ing Co., and in 1879 they moved 
their entire plant to Toronto. 

An exceedingly interest- 
ing chapter in this book deals 
with the development of the self- 
binder in Canada. 

As time passed, the Massey 
company developed a strong per- 
sonnel through the members of 
the family. In Brantford the 
Harris company had attracted 
such rnen as J. K. Osborne, Ly- 
man Jones, J. H. Housser and 
J. N. Shenstone. Each company 
during the eighties' and nineties' 
of last century was showing great 
progress; medals and diplomas 
for their machines were being 
won not only in Canada but in 
Great Britain, France, India and 
other countries. In fact the two 
concerns were strong competitors 
so that in 1891 they resolved to 
make competition co-operation, 
and the amalgamation of the 
Massey and the Harris interests 
was consummated. 

Patterson Bros. & Co., of Pat- 
terson, makers of mowers and 
other lines, had started in 1850. 
In 1891 they amalgamated with 
J. O. Wisner, Son & Co., of 
Brantford, and in the same year 
the two were taken into the 



Ai)ril, 192 



Canadian Farm Implements 



Massey-Harris organization. In 
1892 'the Verity Plow Co. joined 
the amalgamation of concerns, 
and in 1895 the Bain Wagon Co., 
of Brantford, was affiliated. In 
1910 the Massey-Harris Co. ac- 
quired control of the Johnston 
Harvester Co., of Batavia, N.Y., 
and in 1913 they bought out as a 
going- concern the Deyo-Macey 
engine plant, of Binghampton, 
N.Y. This plant was removed 
to Canada, where Massey-Harris 
engines are now made in Weston, 
Ont. Two other acquisitions by 
|;he organization were the Corbin 
disc harrow business at Prescott, 
Ont., in 1893, and the Kemp 
Manure Spreader Co., of Strat- 
ford, Ont., in 1904. 

The company developed its 
foreign trade rapidly, as is shown 
in an interesting section of 'the 
book. Many honors were awarded 
their products at shows and fairs 
all over the world. 

Facts and Figures 

Such is briefly the development 
of the Massey-Harris Company 
and its associates. What of the 
company to-day? The yearly 
out-put is 275,000 complete ma- 
chines. These products travel to 
53 national markets. The firm 
manufactures over 1,000 types of 
machinery and implements. They 
have 3,500 Canadian agencies, and 
700 in Australia and New Zea- 
land. 

The total floor space of the six 
factories is 83 acres ; in all, fac- 
tories and manufacturing space 
cover 161 acres. Twenty million 
board feet of lumber are caf ried 
in stock ; eight miles of railway 
siding bring in raw materials and 
take out finished machines. Sev- 
enty cars can be loaded with the 
company's products at the same 
time. The workers at the six 
plants aggregate 7,800 men of 
whom 2,500 are in the Toronto 
factory. A timber limit of 22,000 
acres is owned in Arkansas. The 
total capitalization of the com- 
pany is over forty million dollars. 
For repair service 'there are al- 
ways approximately 30,000 differ- 
ent spare parts kept in stock at 
distributing points. The com- 
pany's Canadian branch houses 
alone employ over 1,000 men. 

The executive of the company 
at the present time is as follows : 
President, Thos. Findley ; hon. 
pres., C. D. Massey ; vice-pres., 
J. N. Shenstone ; general mana- 
ger, Thos. Bradshaw ; asst. gen- 
eral manager, Geo. Valentine ; 
sales- manager, C. L. Wisner ; 
secretary, Vincent Massey, also 
R. H. Verity; Sir Edmund 
Walker, E. R. Wood and Lloyd 
Harris. 



Lister Line Selling in Coast 
Province 



D. N. Jamieson, manager at 
\'Vinnipeg, for the R. A. Lister 
Co. (Canada) Ltd., recently re- 
turned from a business visit to 
Vancouver and other British Col- 
umbia points. He reports that 
Charles Mulvey, 110 Water St., 
Vancouver, has been appointed 
B.C. distributor for the Lister line. 
Mr. Mulvey now has a complete 
stock of Lister goods in his ware- 
house to meet 'the demands of the 
British Columbia trade. 




LONDON COMBINATION MIXERS 

Two machines in one. A Concrete or Mortar Mixer and Builders' 
Hoist. Mixes and hoists at same time Built in two sizes — -N'os. 
4 and 6. Any contractor who has both m'xing and hoisting on 
the t!ame job saves money using a London Combination Mixer. 

Implement and machinery dealers send for catalogue with price 
list giving agents* discounts. 

London Concrete Machinery Co. Limited 

DEPT K LONDON, CANADA 



I'^xperience is a dear teacher ; 
the rest are underpaid. 




A HIGH GRADE CANADIAN 
ENGINE. MODERATE PRICE 
Made in five Sizes 
Wriie for Catalogue 
LONDON GAS POWE* CO. 
32 York St. Loiidon,Oni. 



The "VEGA" 

Cream Separator 

has for some time been the subject of wide publicity specially directed 
to the consumer in Western Canada. The result has been a most 
gratifying number of sales which cannot fail to reproduce themselves 
because of the unanimity of satisfied owners, who have volunteered 
to us their high appreciation of the machine and the character of 
its work. 

Sales have been made direct from headquarters, but this has only 
taken place in a few instances in which no agent or representative 
of the Company was within reach of the purchaser. We are anxious 
to secure 

AGENTS AT EVERY POINT 

where there is any development or prospective development in dairy 
farming in sight. 

If you, Mr. Dealer, are open to handle The "Vega," get in touch 
with us at once. We have a splendid proposition — an indispensable 
that sells at sight — and every encouragement and backing will be 
given to really live, energetic dealers. We will thoroughly canvass 
the neighbourhood with first rate "pulling" literature in addition 
to the publicity given through the farm papers, and pay commission 
to appointed agents whether or not a sale comes to us direct from 
their territory. 

Write and get full details of what we consider to be the finest Cream 
Separator in existence to-day — the top-notch of Sweden's great 
achievements in dairy machinery. 

FORTUNA CREAM SEPARATOR 

COMPANY, LIMITED 

Direct Factory Representatives 
WINNIPEG : : MANITOBA 



A man on his uppers is far from 
the top. 



Haulage Equipment will be in Big Demand 

Stock Gregg Wagon and Implement Woods 



The Best 
Plow Hitch 
Made. 




Order 
A Supply 
Now. 



4 or 5-Horse Eveners for Gang, Sulky and Disc Plows 

Horse haulage is coming back—fast. Tractors and tractor equipment are high-priced. Farmers will be on the 
market for wagon and implement woods. Why not supply them with this fast sellin? profitable line. Let us tell 
you about our Ncs. 410 and 420 four and five-horse plow eveners, which give the most perfect distribution of draft 
of any evener sold. A set on your wall will assure you nice business, quick turn-over and good profits. 

Our line includes: Plow Eveners, Wagon Sets, Wagon Neck- Yokes and 
Singletrees, Plow Singletrees, Wagon and Plow Doubletrees, Plow Doubletree 
Sets, 3 and 4-horse Hitches, 5 and 6-horse Tandem Eveners, etc. 



Carry 

GREGG Wagon Hardware 
Your Trade Needs it. 

We supply clips, ferrules, 
hooks, neckyoke center 
and end irons, wagonbox 
straps and rods, etc. 



If your jobber can't supply you, write us direct 

Gregg Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



London Motors Ltd. will start 
assembly of their "London Six" 
car in their new plant at London, 
Ont., during the month. 

The Clemens Implement Co., of 
S't. Paul, has been incorporated to 
engage in the implement and 
hardware business. The capital 
stock is $25,000. 

With a capital stock of $200,000 
the Krasberg Piston Ring Co. 
has been incorporated at Chicago 
by Herbert Bebb, Rudolph Kras- 
berg and Julius Keller, Sr. 

H. L. Pierce of the Oliver 
Chilled Plow Works, Minneapo- 
lis, died at his home in Minneapo- 
lis, Sunday morning, March 13, 
after an illness of only a week. 

The A. C. Spark Plug Plant, at 
Brantford, Ont., is completed, 
which, Avith sixteen acres of land, 
has been purchased outright by 
the General Motors Corporation. 

The Vim Tractor Company of 
Schleisingerville, Wis., have 
undertaken the manufacture of 
Tiger drills and .seeders. 

Deere & Co., Moline, 111., has 
placed a new $10,000,000 bond 




Separators 




We can make immediate delivery of all 
sizes. The "Melotte " bowl is self -balancing 
and frictionless. Hangs free from a ball- 
bearing spindle. Unequalled in construction 
and slumming efi9ciency. Sell the "Melotte " 
this season. For full particulars, address : 

R. A. Lister & Company 
(Canada) Limited 

Winnipeg : : Toronto 



issue on sale at 99. The bonds 
bear interest at 7^ per cent, and 
have been issued in denomina- 
tions of $1,000 and $500. 

The Parrett Tractor Co. and 
the Hicks Tractor Co. have been 
consolidated under the name of 
Parrett-Hicks Tractor Co. The 
Hicks concern manufactures a 
crawler type machine. 

W. D. Hoyt, who has been 
manager of the Samson Ttactor 
Co. of Omaha, has been trans- 
ferred to Flint, Mich., and will 
have charge of the company's 
business in that territory. 

Canadian Oil Companies re- 
cently announced a reduction of 
25 cents per gallon in the price 
of all grades of En-ar-co motor 
oils and 35 cents per gallon in the 
price of heavy oil for tractor use. 

L. H. McQuesne, the well- 
known representative of the Bate- 
man-Wilkinson Co., Limited, as 
general agent in Nova Sco'tia and 
Prince Edward Island, has been 
transferred to British Columbia. 

The S. F. Bowser Co. Ltd., 
head office, Toronto, capital $750," 
000 has been registered to do 
business in Saskatchewan. This 
concern manufacture gasoline 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTEDO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for : 

Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Ltd.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
Co.; J. I. Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian TillsoiJ Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadian Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; Emerson-Branting- 
ham Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Stajoley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.; 
Minneapolis Threshing Machine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer- Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



and oil tanks and measuring 
pumps. 

Parker Motors Limited, 101 
Closse St., Montreal, have com- 
pleted distributing arrangements 
for their "Parker Six" cars with 
Grey Motors Ltd., 301 Burnell 
St., Winnipeg. 

The Chatham Malleable and 
Steel Manufacturing Co., manu- 
facturers of automotive parts, 
sanitary stable equipment, etc., 
have completed an addition to 
the plant at Chatham. 

Tractor fans can be driven by 
means of roller chains. The Dia- 
mond Chain & Mfg. Co., Indian- 
apolis, Ind., has developed a chain 
drive of this character that has 
especially interesting features. 

The Caswell Mfg. Co., Chero- 
kee, la., advises that its special 
binder hitch- designed for use 
with the Fordson tractor was 
approved by 'the Fordson imple- 
ment distributors in the United 
States. 

Kroyer Motors Co., Stockton, 
Cal., has awarded a contract for 
the construction of its new plant. 
The first building will be 90 x 
440 feet, of steel brick and con- 
crete. Work will be started im- 
mediately. 

The Grid-Iron Grip Wheel Co., 
Toledo, O., has contracted to 
manufacture grid-iron grips and 
wheels for the Grid-Iron Grip 
Co., of Rock Island, 111. The 
Toledo plant will have a capacity 
of 100 wheels and grips a day. 

C. L. Messecar, general man- 
ager of the Brantford Cordage 
Co., Brantford, Ont., reports that 
the plant is working to utmost 
capacity with all employees on 
a ten-hour day. Much overtime 
is being worked. 

The Stewart Sheaf Loader Co., 
Winnipeg, has decided to issue 
$150,000 of preferred stock to fill 
the authorized capital of the com- 
pany of $500,000. The company 
state that they have orders in 
hand to the value of $100,000. 

W. W. Clark, export manager 
of the Hart-Parr Comipany, has 
just returned from a four-months 
business trip through Europe. 



Mr. Clark visited the Hart-Parr 
distributors in England, Spain, 
France, Belgium, Denmark and 
Sweden. 

« 

W. H. Van Dervoort, president 
of the Root & Van Dervoort in- 
dustries, centred in East Moline, 
111., died recently at his home in 
Moline. He was one of the best 
known gas engine and motor 
manufacturers .in the United 
States. 

The new 1920-1921 edition of 
the Burd Piston Ring Directory 
is just off the press, and the Burd 
High Compression Ring Com- 
pany, who are the publishers, 
claim that it is the most complete 
book in existence devoted to pis- 
ton rings. 

The Stoughton Wagon Com- 
pany of Stoughton, Wis., have 
put on the market a new 1-ton 
speed truck governed to thirty 
miles an hour. It has a wheel 
base of 130 inches, weighs 3,300 
pounds, and is equipped with 
Waukesha engine. 

Coincident with the acquisition 
of the farm wagon business of 
the Studebaker Corporation, the 
Kentucky Wagon Mfg. Co., of 
Louisville, Ky., has outlined a 
definite sales campaign for 1921, 
adding a number of men to both 
field and office force. 

The Association of Commerce, 
at Oshkosh, Wis., is endeavoring 
to induce the La Crosse Tractor 
Co., La Crosse, Wis., to move to 
the former city. It is reported 
that the Oshkosh association has 
offered to raise one-half of the 
capital of $2,000,000. 

Grills Tractors Corporation, 
Limited, Toronto, is the name of 
a new company incorporated with 
a Dominion charter to manufac- 
ture the Grills tractor invented by 
Henry Milton Grills, broker, of 
Toronto. The authorized capital 
of the company is $150,000. 

The Armstrong Motor Works, 
of Lachine, Que., manufacturers 
of gasoline eng'ines for over six- 
teen years, have recently dis- 
continued this line to develop and 
manufacture, on high production 
basis, piston rings and pins, and 



KINGSTON 

IGNITION SERVICE 

SPARK PLUGS — COILS 
MAGNETOS— SWITCHES 

KOKOMO ELECTRIC CO. 

kOKOMO - - - INDIANA U.S.A. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



15 



Motfharn E/ectrfc 

POWER AND LIGHT 



A Complete Line of Electric 
Farm Plants and Accessories 



Belt Connected Plants 

Direct Connected Plants 

Water Systems 

Portable Motors 

Appliances 

Wires and Supplies 

This line will make you 
the Electrical Headquarters 
of your district. 





Belt connected plant — operates 
from any good engine 



Titan Storage Battery, 16 cells 
supplied with each plant, 120 
or 216 Ampere Hours 



With the Plant you can usually 
sell a Water System, while limit- 
less follow-up sales possibilities 
are yours with Utility Motors, 
Vacuum Cleaners, Washing 
Machines, Dishwashers, Irons, 
Toasters, Percolators, Wiring 
Devices of all kinds. Fixtures, etc. 

Write Our Nearest House Now 

Be the Farm Electrifier of Your 
District 





in 








110 Volt D. C. Universal Plant 
For installations of 4KW, 8KW or 12KW 



Nortf/(^rft Efectnc Company 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL QUEBEC TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY 

HALIFAX OTTAWA HAMILTON LONDON WINDSOR REGINA 



EDMONTON 
VANCOUVER 



16 



Canadian Farm Implements aphi, 1921 



other automotive parts for auto- 
mobiles, trucks and tractors. 

The Hart Stooker Co., Ltd., 
has been incorporated at Edmon- 
ton, Alta., with a capital stock of 
$2,000,000 to manufacture grain 
shockers and other implements. 
Incorporators are F. J. McCann, 
P. J. Boyle and A. Graham. 

William R. Stornsell is presi- 
dent and general manager of 
London Motors, Limited, and 
Howard W. Soper is first vice- 
president and secretary. G. D-. 
Pinner and Samuel Willis are 
second and third vice-presidents 
respectively. 

The Mcllroy Belting Works of 
Canada have opened a branch at 
Kingsville, Ont., employing 30 
hands for a start. The parent 
company is located at Hammond, 
Ind. The company will produce 
solid woven and stitched canvas 
belting and fire hose. 

The new offices of the John 
Deere Company, at Welland, 
Ont., are now completed and 
occupied by the company's office 
staff. The new buildinig includes 
a large sample room where a full 
line of the company's products is 
kept permanently on display. 

H. M. Carroll, advertising man- 
ager of the tractor and implement 
bearings division of 'the Hyatt 
Roller Bearing Co., has resigned 
to accept a like position with the 



Remy Electric Co., Anderson, 
Ind. Mr. Carroll has been with 
the Hyatt organization since it 
entered the tractor bearing field. 

The Model L Samson, made by 
the Samson Tractor Co., Janes- 
ville, Wis., is using a new water 
type air cleaner and is equipped 
with an impulse starter. It has 
an extension on 'the manifold, is 
equipped with radiator guard and 
has Hyatt bearings in the front 
wheels. It now weighs 3,650 
pounds. 

The British Thompson Hous- 
ton Magneto Co., of Rugby, 
England, manufacturers of the 
B.T.H. magneto, is another addi- 
tion tp the list of British auto- 
motive concerns seeking for a 
market for their goods in Canada. 
The Canadian General Electric 
Co. Avill act as Canadian distribu- 
tors and will appoint agents. 

The Delahey interests have 
purchased the controlling interest 
in the Macartney Milking Ma- 
chine Company, of Ot'tawa, and 
have elected a new board of 
Directors as follows : Thos. Del- 
ahey, Brockville, president and 
managing director; Alex. Dela- 
hey, Ottawa, vice-president ; Gid- 
eon Delahey, Ottawa, secretary- 
treasurer. 

L. N. Somes, general manager 
of the Macartney-Simes Milking 
Machine Co., Bloomfield, N.J., 



points out that in 'the recent an- 
nouncement regarding the forma- 
tion of the company it was stated 
that a Canadian factory was 
located at Ot'tawa. This is in- 
correct as the Bloomfield . com- 
pany have no branch factory in 
Canada. 



also stock a full line of repairs 
for Webster magne'tos, and have 
a line of electric-lighting outfits' 
for tractors. Dealers will do well 
to get a copy of this new catalog. 
Address the company as above. 



Steel Co. Did Well 



New Acme Catalogue 



We have recently received Cat- 
alog No. 4, issued by the Acme 
Magneto & Electrical Co., 148 
Princess St., Winnipeg. This 
company are the official service 
station for Gray & Davis equip- 
ment, Norma bearings and the 
following makes of magnetos : 
K-W, Berling, Bosch, Dixie, 
Webster, Splitdorf, Sumter. They 
have a fully eciuipped repair shop 
to handle repairs and replace- 
ments on all makes of ignition 
equipment. Their shop is stated 
to contain over $20,000 of special 
magneto repair machinery and a 
stock of over 500,000 repair parts 
for all makes of magnetos is 
carried. 

Dealers throughout the wes't 
are assured of prompt service in 
connection with magneto repairs, 
and also magneto overhauling 
and testing by this well-known 
firm. Their stock of magnetos is 
very complete, comprising makes 
for all the leading tractors. They 



The annual report for 1920 of 
the Steel Company of Canada 
shows that profits were $3,924,- 
042. After deductions for con- 
struction, sinking fund, bond in- 
terest and preferred dividends, 
$1,400,663 was left, or 12.17 per 
cent applicable to $11,500,000 
common stock. Common divi- 
dends took $805,000. Current 
assets total $15,496,019; current 
liabilities $4,825,095. 



Fordson Line Drive Attachment 



The Cole Manufacturing Co., 
Minneapolis, recently commenced 
production on a line drive attach- 
ment for Fordsons, which does 
away with 'the necessity for sit- 
ting on the tractor itself, and 
makes the outfit a strictly one- 
man affair. The operator of the 
machine can sit on his implement 
and handle the tractor just as 
easily as though he were on the 
tractor seat. The belt pulley can 
likewise be operated from a dis- 
tance, for the clutch is controlled 
entirely by lines. 




Same Good Twine in a New Big Ball 



Mccormick, deering 
international 




Saves Time 
when 
Time is Money 



|UST as McCormick and Deering grain binders have 
been accepted as the world's standard— so McCor- 

mick and Deering and International brands of 

binder twine are acknowledged to be the world's best. 

This year the same good old twine is being turned out 
in a new and heavier ball. Six balls to the bale instead of 
ten; same amount of twine in a bale, occupying a third 
less space. This saves storage room for the dealer — almost 
twice as much twine in the new ball, which is practically the 
same size as the old one. Two balls fit any standard twine 
can and tie almost twice as many bundles. 

These features are distinctly valuable' to the big grain 
farmer. The new big ball saves time when time is money. 
The farmers will demand the new size. Can you supply the 
demand ? Write today or see the blockman. 



International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA ^^o. 
HAMILTON CANADA 



EASTERN BRANCHES — HAMILTON. LONDON OTTAWA. ONT, MONTREAL. QUEBEC. QUE.. ST JOHN. N. B. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



Dealers ! 
Watch this 
Space for the 
Latest Addition 

to the 
"BULL DOG" 
Line 



The Twin City 

Separator Company Limited 
Quelch Street - WINNIPEG, MAN. 



r 




^1 




WIN 
WITH THE 
WINNER 



"Ideal" Green 
Feed Silos 

Pay For 
Themselves 



"nPHE winner is always popular. It doesn't make any difference 
whether it's an army, a baseball team, a race horse, or a silo. 
Everybody likes a winner. 

Dealers like to sell the "Ideal" Green Feed Silo because it is the 
best. Farmers buy the " Ideal " Green Feed Silo and are proud of 
it because they know it is the best. 

The superiority of the ' ' Ideal ' ' Green Feed Silo is so apparent 
to impartial judges that there is no comparison. 

More direct enquiries for Silos have been received during the last 
six months than during the last four years. 

Your sales of "Ideal" Green Feed Silos will not only be a profit- 
able line to you, but will bring about more prosperity to the 
community. 

Write for the De Laval price list and folder, and start the Silo 
business in your district right now. 

THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, LIMITED 



WINNIPEG 



EDMONTON 



VANCOUVER 



Saves Grain the Threshing 
Machine Wastes 



"5aDe the Qrain* 




Thia trade-mark (in colors) ia on each 
side of The Grain-Saving ^X'ind Stack- 
er. It is the trade-mark that farmers and 
threshermen know as identifying The 
Grain - Saving Wind Stacker — the 
Stacker which puts the grain in the 
sack and does not waste it in the straw 
stack. 



THE Grain-Saving Wind 
Stacker saves tke grain the 
threshing machine wastes — traps 
it before it gets to the stacker fan. 

Faulty sieve adj ustments, improp- 
er regulation of blast, excessive 
speed variations, unfavorable 
weather, careless feeding — these 
conditions are grain wasters, some 
of which exist on most every 
threshing job. This Stacker is a 
check on them ALL — puts' the 
grain in the sack where it belongs 
and not in the stack. 

"It saves the grain any good sep- 
arator puts over during heavy 
threshing, and we earnestly ad- 
vise our fellow threshermen to 



demand a GRAIN-SAVING 
WIND STACKER when buying 
a new separator." — Honzay Bro- 
thers, Olivia, Minnesota. 

Farmers throughout North 
America are insisting on having 
The Grain-Saving Wind Stacker 
on their threshing jobs. Protecft 
your customers — see that this 
Stacker is on the threshing ma- 
chine YOU sell. Leading manu- 
fadturers in the United States and 
Canada have adopted this Stack- 
er. Many supply it exclusively. 
Others can supply it if you de- 
mand it and insist on having it. 
Specify THE GRAIN-SAVING 
WIND STACKER and accept 
no other! 



Grain-Saving Wind Stacker advertising is running in twenty-nine lead- 
ing farm papers — reaching over three and one-half million readers. 

The Grain-Saving JVind Stacker originated "with 
The Indiana 3\lanufa&uring Company.Indianapolis, U. S. A. 



Olie GMAIN^SMNG SF"^ 




tacker 



l^art-'al 'view — 



looking into hooper, showing 
grain trap near stacker fan; lIs-^ 
auger runningfromundemeath 
trap for returning saved grain 



18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Price Reductions Common 



Reports from 'the United 
States show that a great many 
of the leading makers of farm 
machinery are lowering their 
prices. It can be taken for 
granted that this step has been 
necessitated owing to conditions. 
I't was a question of maintaining 
prices at a point fully justified by 
production costs, or cutting prices 
below cost and moving goods. 

The latter course has been 
adopted in many instances, the 
factories accepting very heavy 
losses as one of the penalties of 
readjustment. I't cannot be said, 
so far, that the lowered prices 
have stimulated buying to any 
great extent, but in summer and 
fall business the effect will doubt- 
less be felt. Without doubt 'the 
step was necessary. The farmer 
would not buy ; dealers were can- 
celling orders, and lower prices 
were urged from many quarters. 

Despite the many facts given 
as to why prices had necessarily 
to be maintained, the step had to 
be taken. One firm followed 
another, until many showed lower 
quo'tations. It simply meant re- 
duction under economic pressure. 
At the same time, no man in the 
industry should forget that the 
prices of farm implements never 
rose as did the great majority of 
lines. Throughout the war the 
indu.stry kept i'ts prices as low as 
possible, until now reductions 
have been announced largely be- 
cause of the fact that the farmer 
classes all manufacturers alike 
and cannot, or will not, believe 
that he has not had to pay too 
much for his farm equipment. 

While the reductions will do 
much to stabilize business, and to 
restore buying confidence, the 
dealer will be well advised to not 
make the factor of lower price 
the great argument in selling 
goods. The farmer will never be 
satisfied with the prices of farm 
equipment no mat'ter what they 
are; his mental attitude is that 
everything was, is, and will be, 
too high in price — except the 
products which he sold in' the 
past, or has to sell to-day. Avoid 
further price arguments. Sell 'the 
goods on the basis of what they 
mean to the farmer. If price is 
made a selling factor the dealer 
is up against the argument that 
this may be but the thin edge of 
the reduction wedge. As a mat- 
ter of fact, it is but a phase 
in readjustment, and considerable 
time must necessarily pass before 
it can be hoped that manufactured 
products can get bacik to 1914 
prices. When labor comes back 
to its old scales — and i't gives 
thousands of reasons why it can 
*iot — then it will be possible to 




When the Dealer Sells M.O. 
Goods 



THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPROVINCIAL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF DEALERS IN AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES, ENGINES AND MACHINERY 

Established in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLDG. WINNIPEG, CANADA 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
$1.00 per year in Canada: Foreign $1.25 per year 



Single Copies, Ten Cents 



ADVERTISING 
RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this oflSoe not later than the 25th of the 
month preceding issue in which insertion is desired. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name^* We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 

Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post OflSce as second class matter 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, APRIL, 1921 



produce goods at something like 
the prices which prevailed in the 
halcyon days of the peaceful past. 



Curing Cancellitis 



Nothing develops any human 
being quite so much as meeting 
every single obligation, real or 
implied, that he ever assumes. 
In business we have acquired a 
bad habit of "passing the buck". 
Whatever a man has agreed to 
do, even if it seems unwise or 
imreasonable afterwards, is the 
thing that must be dohe at all 
costs. 

If every man who sells mer- 
chandise would insist that buyers 
live up to the terms of the sale ; 
if buyers would solemnly deter- 
mine never to buy beyond the 
needs of their business or their 
capacity for paying; if no one 
would cancel orders under pres- 
sure — thus passing along the bur- 
den, with possible losses to some- 
one else — we should straightway 
enter into a new and golden era 
of business. 



some of the largest British manu- 
facturers have ceased to send 
representatives to call on their 
dealers, doing business by mail 
only. The importation of British- 
made machinery by Ireland has 
been falling steadily. In 1918 
the value of implements imported 
by Ireland was $940,415; in 1919 
it was only $710,500. 

In 1919, Ireland exported im- 
plements to the value of $80,705, 
and cordage and binder twine 
valued at, roughly, $5,855,800. 
Of the $710,500 worth of imple- 
ments imported in 1919, a- value 
of $123,255 went to Ireland direct 
from the United States and 
Sweden. 



Income Tax Law 



Ireland Boycotts British-made 
Machinery 



A cable report states that a 
decree adopted by the Irish 
Republican Party boycotts all 
importations of farm implements, 
machinery and equipment. In 
view of the condition of Ireland, 



Stringent changes have been 
made in the Federal Income Tax 
law. The 'taxpayer must now 
calculate what amount of money 
he is to pay and must send at 
least one-quarter of the amount 
he will pay in 1921, to cover 1920 
taxes, not later than April 30th, 
1921. The rest is payable later, 
with 6 per cent interest added, 
in three two monthly instalments. 
All corporations are required to 
send in a lis't of employees. 



With conditions fashions 
change — also, ways of doing busi- 
ness. It is, however, strange 'to 
learn that some dealers in West- 
ern territory are purchasing lines 
from mail-order catalog houses, 
and are re-selling same to their 
trade. .Such lines embody har- 
rows, trucks, wood goods, etc. 
Truly, the factor of price is a 
great thing to-day in doing busi- 
ness, but in 'the end will it profit 
the dealer -to sell his customers 
mail-order goods? 

■Granted that the re-sale price 
of such goods is low, and that 
with them some volume may be 
had, is the quality such 'that it will 
reflect credit 'to the dealer, or add 
prestige to his business? Cheap 
goods are cheaply built. When 
the implement falls to pieces — 
no matter how low a price the 
farmer paid — will he blame the 
mail-order house who sold it? 
No, he will blame the dealer who 
handled it — if he obtained it 
locally. And the fact of handling 
such stuf¥ will assuredly have a 
bad effect upon the future trade 
of the implement retailer. 

Cheap goods are dear at any 
price — especially so for the man 
who sells them. Through a cat- 
alog the farmer will get stung 
and say nothing. But he will 
say lots if he gets stung through 
the instrumentality of the imple- 
ment dealer. Viewed from any 
standpoint it is a short-sighted 
policy for the dealer to buy mail- 
order goods for re-sale in his 
territory. He is simply aiding 
the catalog concerns to slay small 
town trade, and as their agent 
assumes a responsibility that will 
in the end reflect upon his busi- 
ness in no uncertain way. 



Laying Off Men 



Early to bed, early to rise — and 
you don't meet many prominent 
people. 



A press despatch from Chicago, 
on March 24, states that the 
International Harvester Co. had 
made known proposed wage re- 
ductions for 45,000 employees. 
It was further stated that "pres- 
ent economic conditions" would 
necessitate the laying off of sev- 
eral thousand men within the 
next sixty days. 

On April first the Interna- 
tional Harvester Co., Chicago, 
according to a report, made a 
$10,000,000 slash in their payroll. 
The 45,000 employees involved in 
the wage reduction have been re- 
ceiving an aggregate pay of be- 
tween $70,000,000 and $80,000,- 
000. Men on piece work and 
hourly basis have been cut 20 per 
cent and officials and salaried 
employees trimmed 10 per cent, 
according to officials. A few 
employees were cut 5 per cent. 



April, 1921. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



19 



Personal 



H. Bannister has sold his gar- 
age at Sedley. *■ 

H. Bannister is a new automo- 
bile dealer at Gray. 

A. Demers, machinery dealer at 
Debden, has sold out. 

Jas. Thornton is opening a 
garage at Carberry. 

J. Belanger has opened a har- 
ness store at Courval. 

C. Issar has sold out his har- 
ness store at Theodore. 

The Roy Garage, in Saskatoon, 
suffered a fire loss recently. 



Heads Insurance Companie 



We reproduce a recent photograph of 
C. L. Clark, manager of the Canadian 
Hardware and Implement Underwriters, 
with head office at 802 Confederation 
Life Building, Winnipeg. The firm is 
Canadian underwriters for the policies 
issued by the Retail Hardware Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, Minneapolis; 
Minnesota Implement Mutual Fire In- 
surance Com,pany, Owatonna, and Hard- 
ware Dealers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Stevens Point, Wisconsin. 

Fire insurance is provided for imple- 
ment andl hardware dealers at very low 
cost. Board rates are charged and the 
dividend, or that portion of the pre- 
mium not used for losses and expenses 
is returned to the policy holder at the 
expiration of policj'. Every year since 
1908 the companies have given a divi- 
dend of 50 per cent. The guaranteeing 
companies hold Dominion license and 




C. L. CLARK 

the Underwriters are licensed in On- 
tario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Al- 
berta. It is announced that all Cana- 
dian premiums are invested in Canada. 

Mr. Clark started in the insurance 
business as a local agent at Menominie, 
Wis., where he worked for six years. 
He then went to Marsh & McLennan, 
the well-known Minneapolis brokers, 
for three years, and in 1919 joined the 
Retail Hardware Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company at Minneapolis, travelling 
Minnesota for tliat company. In the 
fall of last year the was appointed Cana- 
dian manager of the three companies is- 
suing the Canadian Hardware and Im- 
plement Underwriters^ policy^^^ 

Figures for the companies for 1929 
are interesting. Their premium income 
was! over $3,€0O,O0O. They paid losses 
of over $810,000, and gave policy hold- 
ers dividends aggregating over $1,180,- 
000. The insurance now in force is 
over $274,000,000. 



Parsons & Bell are owners of 
an auto concern at Elkhorn. 

C. E. Anderson, Marquis, has 
sold out to Dennis Mahoney. 

C. A. Mills has opened a har- 
ness business at High River. 

Craig & Daniel have opened an 
auto repair shop in Brandon. 

W. H. Gillespie has opened an 
implement business at Sidney. 

Robt. Grieve has commenced a 
garage business at Vancouver. 

Chas. Miller is the new owner 
of the Bulyea Garage, Bulyea. 

Partnership has been registered 
in the Gas Pickler Co., at Regina. 

J. M. Cooper is a new imple- 
ment and grain dealer a't Irvine. 
T. Isherwood is owner of a 
harness business at Strome. 
S. Pettet has opened an 
automobile business at Kaleida. 

T. Lambert has commenced in 
the harness business at Chaplin. 

P. Graff, a dealer at Edmonton, 
has sold to Blake & McClennan. 

Electric Supplies Ltd. have 
opened fpr business at Watrous. 

Johnson, a dealer at 
s reported to be selling 




M. N. 
Provost, 
out. 

J. M; Berg, a thresher agent 
at Altona,\ has gone out of busi- 
ness. 

Geo. SteWart is the name of a 
new implement dealer at Wey- 
burn. 

J. E. Johii.son, implement dealer 
at Mileston^, has sold out to M. 
Tate. 

J. A. Pakon, Pinkham, has 
discontinued ihis implement busi- 
ness. 

Partnership! is registered by the 
Garage Ownets and Operators, at 
Togo. I 

G. Strickland, auto dealer at 
Milestone, has sold out to E. B. 
Shield. 

Herbert Sm;il has commenced 
in the farm nfachinery trade at 
Piapot. ; 

A. J. Stokes a dealer at Est- 
uary, has mov( d his business to 
Burstall. 

J. Green has ; old his auto busi- 
ness at Strathc lair to Brown & 
Crooms. 

J. H. ys/arren, 
has sold out his 
Scaberg. 

Russell Kennedy is now oper- 
ating an implement business at 
Napinka. 

Orville Thomas, of the Coutts 
Machinery Co., Edmonton, died 
recently. 

Scott Bros, are owners of a 
new automobile business in 
Gleichen. 

PartneEship is dissolved in the 
Auto TjTe & Vulcanizing Co., at 
Yorkti^. 



a dealer at Unity, 
interests to J. L. 



Maksoff & Oglopp is the title 
of a new farm machinery concern 
at Benito. 

J. Walls, implement dealer at 
Strathmore, has sold out to C. 
M. Davis. 

Van- Wart & Nelson have 
closed their auto agency concern 
at Dysart. 

N. B. Gresmer, a dealer at 
Hodgeville, has sold out to D. B. 
Lockwood. 

J. M. Oke & Son have sold out 
their automobile business at 
Boissevain. 

W. S. Swaggert is the owner 
of a new auto service station at 
Vancouver. 

Boiteau & Thompson, vulcan- 
izers at Virden, have dissolved 
partnership. 

A. E. Flanagan, a dealer at 
Abbey, has taken a partner into 
his business. 

W. L. Mcintosh, a dealer at 
Rossburn, has sold out to N. 
Lock & Son. 

Stelter Bros, have sold out their 
auto interests, at Irvine, to Die- 
bold & Ross. 

W. S. Eraser, auto dealers at 
MariapoHs, has sold out to W. 
L. Choquette. 

O. Swedberg is reported to 
have sold out his auto business 
at Marshwell. ^ 

J. C. McCalpin has opened a 
garage and automobile business 
at Boissevain^ 

F. R. McLennan, farm machin- 
ery dealer at Wilkie, is succeeded 
by W. A. Shaw. 

Prey & Proctor have commen- 
ced in the auto repair business, 
at Port Alberni. 

McFarlane & Jeshberger have 
commenced in the garage busi- 
ness at Calgary. 

Frank Thompson, machinery 
dealer at Minburn, is succeeded 
by Anderson Bros. 

C. L. Race, implement dealer 
at Spirit River, has sold out to 
Harper & Dodge. 

Jackson & Wilson, garage 
owners at High Bluff, have closed 
out their business. 

Carnahan & McKnight, imple- 
ment dealers at Virden, have dis- 
solved partnership. 

O. Dechief has bought out the 
implement business of O. P. 
Thieven, at Forget. 

Sidney Jones, harness dealer at 
Swalwell, has sold out his busi- 
ness to I. Klassen. 

The Portage Battery Service is 
the name of a new firm at 
Portage la Prairie. 

Stein & Hausser have dissolved 
partnership in their implement 
concern at Neudorf. 

Moodie & Davis recently suf- 



fered fire loss in their auto busi- 
ness at Strassbourg. 

Smith & Morrow are owners 
of an implement and garage con- 
cern at Lake Valley. 

H. A. Williscroft has sold out 
his auto repair shop at Maple 
Creek to H. Phillpot. 

Thomas Sprague, implement 
dealer at Windthorst, has sold 
out to Adam Keppell. 

Maturskyme & Dyok have 
opened a vulcanizing and tire 
business at Davidson. 



England Orders Many Ruggles 
Trucks 



C. R. Clark, representing a large Brit- 
ish automotive firm in London, England, 
made a very careful inspection tour of 
the Ruggles Motor Truck Company's 
plant and carefully went over the Rug- 
gles models during March. Mr. Clark 
was very high in his praise of Ruggles 
trucks, the factory, the Ruggles organ- 
ization and the splendid progress made 
since its organization. Firm orders were 
given for all models of trucks for im- 
mediate sliipment, and schedules were 
presented for future deliveries in the im- 
mediate succeeding months up to .June. 




FRANK W. RUGGLES 
President, Ruggles Motor Track Com- 
pany, Limited, London, Ont. 

The combined interests in London 
which Mr. .Clark represents liave within 
the last nine months imported into Eng- 
land more than 700 trucks. It is safe to 
say that, from Mr. Clark's enthusiasm, 
the Ruggles Motor Truck Company's pro- 
duct will become a leader in quantity of 
trucks which they are using throughout 
Great Britain. 

At a luncheon given Mr. Clark by the 
directors and executives of the Ruggles 
Company, that gentleman expressed his 
full appreciation of the treatment and 
reception given him by the Ruggles Com- 
pany, and stated that as soon as inter- 
national conditions of exchange and 
credits became less keen he believed the 
motor trucks which were being manufac- 
tured in London, Ont., would find a 
steady and increasing demand in Lon- 
don, England, and throughout the British 
Empire. 



20 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Klassen Bros, have dissolved 
partnership in their automobile 
business, in Waldheim. 

The Regina Roofing & Cornice 
Co. is a new concern recently 
incorporated at Regina. 

Crane Limited, wholesale hard- 
ware, Regina, have increased 
their capital to $3,000,000. 

Crummy Bros., dealers at 
Grande Prairie, sustained fire loss 
in their premises recently. 

R. A. McAllister has opened a 
nice implement and farm equip- 
ment stand at Kelvington. 

Schweitzer & Rostalski are 
owners of a tractor and automo- 
bile repair shop at Dysart. 

Walter Shaw, the worthy 
'smith at Bulyea is now handling 
farm machinery in that town. 

Booth & Stinson, of Treherne, 
have dissolved partnership in 
their farm machinery business. 

A change is reported in con- 
nection with the ownership of the 
Assiniboia Vulcanizing Works. 

Sam Fishtrom is the name of 
an implement man who opened 
for business recenty at Kamsack. 

J. Stewart & Co., automobile 
men at Grassy Lake, have sold 
out at that point to S. Gibson. 

H. L. Kaufenberg & Co. suf- 
fered a fire loss in their automo- 
bile business at Leslie recently. 

The North American Lumber 
& Supply Co., Fairwood, suffered 
fire loss on their premises re- 
cently. 

Bethal Bros., implement deal- 
ers at Beausejour, have sold out 
their business to Kaszowski & 
Strecker. 

The Strath Motor Garage, at 
Strathmore, suffered considerable 
fire loss in connection with their 
business. 

H. Roberts is . reported to 
have bought out the implement 
business of E. P. Aldous,^ at 
Lemburg. 

G. W. Parkes, president of the 
Maxwell-Chalmers Motor Co., 
was a recent business visitor to 
AVinnipeg. 

W. Clemenson has sold otit his 
implement business at Clares- 
holm to a firm named Qually & 
Rompain. 

The Brett Manfg. Co., manu- 
facturers of incubators in Winni- 
peg, have increased their capital 
to $200,000. 

A report states that Frank 
Marks, implement and hardware 
dealer at Holdfast, is discontinu- 
ing business. 

O'Neil & Cannons are suc- 
ceeded in 'the implement business 
at Cypress River by Cannons and 
Brynjoelsson. 
" Richardson & Bradshaw, auto 
dealers at Bethany, have dis- 



solved partnership. J. H. Brad- 
shaw continues. 

D. >E. Crabb, electric plant 
owner and automobile dealer at 
Borden, has sold out in that town 
to Matske Bros. 

Strassburg has a new imple- 
ment firm in Cockran & Brown. 
We wish the new firm every suc- 
cess in their location. 

W. Reed, an implement and 
farm equipment man at Loug- 
heed, has sold out his interests 
to a dealer named Buxton. 

A. M. Brown and O. W. Or- 
well, partners in the A. M. Brown 
Motor & Electric Co., a't Leader, 
have dissolved partnership. 

J. & A. Bell, implement dealers 
at Oakville, have dissolved part- 
nership. In future A. Bell will 
be sole owner of the business. 

J. Moxley, hardware and im- 
plement dealer at Rivers, has 
taken a partner. The firm now 
operates as Moxley & Forman. 

The Williams Motor Co., Win- 
nipeg, are applying for authority 
to increase the capital of the com- 
pany from $40,000 to $150,000. 

Frank Bridge, an auto and 
hardware dealer at Carman, has 
sold out his hardware interes'ts to 
the Lena Trading Co., of Lena. 

Kerr & Thompson, implement 
and automobile and accessory 
dealers at Killarney, have dis- 
solved partnership in their busi- 
ness. 

At Rhein, W. J. Duncan & 
Sons bought out 'the machinery 
trade of Gulak Bros., who form- 
erly operated the store in that 
town. 

The J. L Case Plow Works Co., 
Racine, Wis., has appointed C. 
S. Heimbach manager of the Des 
Moines branch of the organiza- 
tion. 

K. E. Hicks has opened in the 
garage trade at Saskatoon. In 
the same city J. J. Olmstead has 
sold out to the Saskatoon General 
Electric Co. 

H. W. Hutchinson, vice-presi- 
dent of the Sawyer-Massey Co., 
Hamilton, Ont., recently spent a 
week at the Winnipeg office of 
the company. 

McPherson & Hall, automobile 
dealers at Minitonas have dis- 
solved partnership. G. R. Mc- 
Pherson will control the business 
in future. 

C. Peloquin has commenced a 
harness business at Retlaw. In 
in the same town the Murphy 
Garage is a recent addition to 
local business. . 

y. Mains & Son, implement 
dealers at Carievale, have dis- 
solved partnership. In future J. 
IT. Mains will have sole control 
of the business. 



Adolph Hull, implement dealer 
and garage man at Gravelbourg, 
has sold out his garage business 
and will concentrate on the im- 
plement lines. 

J. Green has sold his au'to con- 
cern at Strathclair to Brown & 
Croome; In the same town J. N. 
Weller has discontinued his im- 
plement business. 

Vincent Massey, secretary of 
the Massey-Harris Company, 
Toronto, has been elected a di- 
rector of the Mutual Life Assur- 
ance Co. of Canada. 

Mr. Greenway, formerly assist- 
ant manager of the Estevan 
branch of the International Har- 
vester Co., has been appointed 
manager at Lethbridge. 

Norton & Lief, the well known 
farm machinery and 'tractor dis- 
tributing concern at Calgary, 
have been succeeded by the 
Northern Machinery Co. 

Greig Bros., implement dealers 
at Reston, have discontinued 
business. Another Reston firm 
to discontinue is J. H. McLand- 
ress, automobile dealer. 

The Polar Liquid Co., Winni- 
peg, has changed its name to 
Robinson & Webber Ltd. The 
comjiany will handle Hercules 
bumpers along with other lines. 

Frank McSherry suffered fire 
loss in his automobile business 
at Weyburn recently. In the 
same town Thomas & Tate, im- 
plement dealers, have dissolved 
partnership. 

A change in ownership is re- 
ported in connection with Aglers 
Service Garage, Prince Albert. 
In the same town D. H. Wood, 
implement dealer, has discontin- 
ued business. 

Judge Locke, of Morden, will 
taice accounts of the partnership 
of Windam, Foley & Burrows, 
implement dealers, in that town, 
for the purpose of winding up the 
partnership. 

Fairbanks & Teatzel have 
opened up a new garage and 
repair shop in the old Tiltson 
garage at Claresholm. This 
makes five garages in this thriv- 
ing Alberta town. 

J. Jones, of the Jones Tractor 
and Implement Co., Regina, was 
a recent business visitor 'to Win- 
nipeg. Mr. Jones anticipates a 
good demand for the Bates line 
of tractors this season. 

A. Beischel, an implement 
dealer at Assiniboia, has sold out 
to Harvey Bros., who formerly 
operated a machine business at 
Macoun. They have closed their 
store in the latter town. 

M. Schibsby, manager at Min- 
neapolis for the J. I. Case Plow 
Works Co., was a recent busi- 
ness visitor to Winnipeg. Mr. 
Schibsby states that business in 



the United States shows signs of 
improvement. 

Announcement is made that 
the George White & Sons Co., 
London, Ont., with branches at 
Brandon and Moose Jaw, have 
been authorized to increase "the 
capital of the company from 
$170,000 to $1,000,000. 

In Bashaw, Brown & Wells 
have bought out the garage and 
auto and tractor repair business 
formerly owned by Forrestor & 
Wheeler. In the same town. 
Ruff & Witzke, hardware and 
implement dealers, have dissolved 
partnership. Mir. Rufif will con- 
tinue the business. 

H. C. Wallace, president of the 
Link Manufacturing Co., Kansas 
City, recently spent a day or two 
in Winnipeg on his way to the 
Canadian branch at Portage la 
Prairie. The Link Manfg. Co. 
may manufacture their line of 
tractor tenders at the Portage 
plant. 

Dave E. Darrah, sales promo- 
tion manager of the Hart-Parf 
Co., Charles City, Iowa, recently 
attended Hart-Parr dealers con- 
ventions in Saskatchewan and 
Alberta. Mr. Darrah has spent 
the last three months attending 
dealers conventions for his com- 
pany. 

AVe recently had a visit from 
our old friend, Geo. W. Mathe- 
son, formerly an implement 
dealer at Craik, Sask. Mr. Mathe- 
son spent the winter 'in Ontario, 
and reports that the 'trade in 
that province are showing a very 
live interest in organization. He 
will remain for a few weeks in 
the West, but has not yet decided 
upon his plans for the future. 

Winnipeg Trade Items. — Con- 
tant Bros., auto accessory dealers, 
have sold out. The Elmwood 
Auto Painting Co. have commen- 
ced business at 195 Riverton Ave. 
The Freeland Steel Tank Co., 
makers of farm 'tanks, have sold 
out to. the Metal Shingle & Siding 
Co. The Grand Service Garage, 
381 Stella Ave. have commenced 
operations, also the North End 
Radiator & Metal Co., who have 
opened on. Main St. The Radford- 
Wright Lumber Co., lumber 
dealers and silo manufacturers, 
have changed the name of the 
company to the Radford- Wright- 
Wilson Co. Ltd., and have in- 
creased their capital from $150,- 
000 to $500,000. 



Fiat Distributor for Canada 

M. A. Kennedy Limited, 106 
Adelaide St. West, Toronto, has 
been appointed Canadian distrib- 
utor for Fiat cars, trucks and 
tractors, as manufactured by Fiat 
Motors, of Turin, Italy. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



21 



John Deere Service 



PUTS KICK INTO 
THE SPRING WORK 




Simplest, Easiest Spreader Built 

^ I ''HIS top-notch, low-down manure and straw spreader has made 
A many friends for John. Deere throughout Western Canada. 
Here are an even dozen out of scores of advantages it possesses:— 

(1) It is easy to load from front to rear — only 36 inches to top of box. 

(2) HIGH DRIVE WHEELS lighten the draft and furnish extra traction. 

(3) Simple beater drive — gears run in oil in dust-proof case. 

(4) No clutches, no chains, no adjustments. 

(5) Only about half the parts necessary on the ordinary spreader. 

(6) Main working parts mounted on axle — true alignment maintained. 

(7) PATENT REVOLVING RAKE prevents bunching or choking— uniform 

speed assured. 

(8) Patented apron drive prevents racing of apron under all conditions; 

it does not act as a brake. 

(9) Easy to understand and operate — only two levers. 

(10) Turns in its own length. 

(11) Tractor hitch enables spreader to be operated- from tractor seat. 

(12) With straw-spreading attachment, it spreads straw perfectly — a 

two-in-one machine that one man can operate. 



THE MAN WHO DOESN'T OWN A JOHN DEERE WISHES HE DID. GET HIM NOW! 

The REAL BRAINS of the VAN BRUNT DRILL 

If a seed in the process of planting does not find its billet in the soil exactly at the correct depth for germination, that seed is lost. If this 
occurs to many seeds, the wastage may spell disaster to the season's production. 




This is how the Van Brunt makes its seed 
delivery: — • 

Note first of all the great clearance 
between the discs of the furrow opener. 
This is made possible by the narroA^ 
chilled bearings of large diameter, oil- 
tight, dust-proof, guaranteed not to wear 
out. 

The reproduction on your right shows 
exactly what happens in the Van Brunt 
Delivery system. The seed as it falls from grain tube 
drops straight to bottom of furrow before turn of the 
disc starts upward. It cannot escape and an absolutely 
uniform planting at the proper depth level is 
guaranteed. Every seed is protected until it 
reaches the bottom of seed furrow. The VAN 
BRUNT handles with complete success every 
kind of seed that can be planted with a drill 
and in any quantity per acre desired: Wheat, 
Oats, Barley, Flax, Rye, Alfalfa, Peas, CornJ etc. 



Keeps Inside 

OF Disc 
Blades Clean 




Grain Reaches' 
Bottom of Furrow 
Before Turn of Disc Starts Upward 



Van Brunt 
Disc Bearings 
Guaranteed 



Our 

Standing 
Offer 

We replace 
free of 
charge all 
Van Brunt 
Disc Bear- 
ings that 
wear out 



VAN BRUNT ADJUSTABLE GATE FORCE FEED 




Regular Position 



For Coarse Seed 



For Large Kernels 



4. 

To Clean Feed 



THESE ARE EXCLUSIVE FEATURES 



1. Regular Position. — A\l gates up, with 

latches in top notches at left side, to 
sow corn, beets, all grain and small 
seed. 

2. For Coarse Seed. — Fasten all latches at 

right side to sow peas, common beans 
and extra large quantity of trashy 
oats. 

3. For Large Kernels. — Fasten all latches 

in lower notch on left side to sow 
marrowfat or kidney beans. 

4. To Clean Feeds. — Loosen all hatches 

and drop gates to clean out feeds. 




The VAN BRUNT 

is the great original drill 
of its type from which 
other makers have made 
poor copies of its exclu- 
sive features. Some have 
made changes, but not 
improvements. Get the 
great original brought 
up-to-date. 



John Deere Plow Company, Limited 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



LETHBRIDGE 



22 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Tractor Tenders— A New Line 
for the Dealer 



H. C. Wallace, manager of the 
Link Manfg. Co., Kansas City, 
and Portage la Prairie, is now in 
the latter tOAvn and will remain 
at the Canadian headquarters of 
the company during the summer. 
He reports that the Link Manfg. 
Co. are now placing upon the 
AVest Canadian market their line 
of tractor tenders, which have 
had a remarkable demand in the 
U.S. following their appearance 
on the market at the start of 
1920. The company Avill arrange 
to build their tractor tenders at 
Portage la Prairie to supply Can- 
adian trade, but they have a 
stock in hand for prompt delivery 
to Western dealers. 

These tractor tenders are an 
at'tachment which should be very 



popular with tractor owners. 
They are an all-steel carriage 
which is drawn behind the trac- 
tor, with a platform and barrel 
holder attachment that take any 
make of steel barrel or drum and 
clamp it firmly in place. Space 
is also provided for carrying extra 
cans of lubricating oils and water. 
By means of a ratchet attachment 
and lever the kerosene or gasoline 
drums can be tilted automatically 
at any angle so that the fuel can 
be drawn. The tender runs on 
two strong 50-inch steel wheels 
with a tongue stand so that the 
tender is kept level when not in 
use. The farmer can hitch the 
tender behind the tractor, drive 
to the field, unhitch and start his 
work. He is assured of an ample 
supply of fuel, oil and water at 
all times, with no loss of time, 
no wastage in supply and safe 
transportation. In brief the trac- 



tor tender solves the problem of * 
extra fuel supply for the tractor 
owner. Made in Portage la 
Prairie the tenders will be sold 
at practically the same price as 
in the U.S. 

The Link Mfg. Co., as Western 
dealers are "aware, are also manu- 
facturers of the Liberty grain 
blower, a simple machine that 
acts as an elevator, re-cleaner and 
Sfrader at the same time. This 
equipment has no buckets, con- 
veyors, chains or gears. It has 
only one moving part — a steel 
fan. The grain is cleaned and 
elevated up to 30 feet, filling the 
biggest cars or bins without 
scooping. The company report a 
nice demand for the Liberty grain 
bloAver from this territory. In- 
terested dealers can obtain full 
information from the branch at 
Portage la Prairie. 



Sawyer-Massey Shows 
Increased Business 




The Display of D. Ackland & Son Ltd., at the 
Western Canada Automotive Equipment Show 



To-day there are approximately 400,000 cars registered in Canada. This assures an 
accessory demand that can be developed- in every territory in the West, i 

We carry a complete stock of Accessories, including Garage Equipment, Tools, Tires, 
Batteries, Car and Tractor Spark Plugs, Piston Rings, Wrench Sets, Jacks, Pumps, etc. 
Quick-selling, profitable lines, in big demand. Lay in a stock. It will put new life in your 
business. 

Dealers: --Write for Special Automotive 
Accessory Catalogs Nos. 20 and 20A 

D. Ackland & Son Limited 

WINNIPEG GALGARY 



The annual report of the Saw- 
)^er-Massey Co. Ltd., Hamil'ton, 
Ont., as recently issued, shows 
that the 1920 volume of business 
of the company was increased 30 
per cent over 1919 and 50 per 
cent over 1918. A large business 
Avas done in threshers sold to the 
United States, and a shipment of 
road-making machinery was re- 
cently sent to the government of 
Jamaica. The plant was in con- 
tinuous operation during 1920 
with the exception of two weeks 
shut-down in November, when 
inventory was taken. After de- 
ducting administration expense 
the profits for 'the twelve months 
totalled $223,815. In the previous 
year the net profits were $99,282, 
indicating a gain of $124,533. The 
preferred stock of the company 
is $1,500,000 and the common 
stock the same. The earnings 
were thus nearly 15 per cent on 
the preferred, or sufficient to pay 
'the 7 per cent dividend on the 
preferred, and nearly 8 per cent 
on the common. No dividend 
was paid, the earnings of the 
year being distributed as follows: 
Bond interest, $28,000; income 
tax, etc., $20,000 ; reserve for plant 
depreciation ; reserve for inven- 
tory, $50,000; profit and loss, 
$101,000. total assets of the 
company are reported at $5,915,- 
000. The debit profi't and loss 
account is now reduced to 
$352,000. 

H. W. Hutchinson, who has 
been general manager of the 
Sawyer-Massey Co. for the past 
two years, is a. prominent figure 
in the implement trade of the 
Dominion. It is reported that in 
future Mr. Hutchinson will spend 
more of his 'tirne in the West, 
where the company has five 
branches, making occasional trips 
to the East to keep in touch with 
production at the Hamilton fac- 
tories. 

I'liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinin^ 

I How is Your Stock of | 

I Bill Heads and j 
I Letter Heads? I 

I Is it running pretty low? | 

I • If so write us and find | 
■ I out what is most up-to- | 
I date in this line. | 

I We will let you have all | 
I information promptly. | 

I The QTOV EL CO. Ltd. | 

A Complete Printing Service = 



-s 



n 



□ 



I Bannawne Ave. WINNIPEG | 
iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM iiiiiiiiiiiiiii'B 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



23 



Lauson Lowers Prices 



The John Lauson Mfg. Co., 
New Holstein, Wis.,, announce 
the following reductions in prices 
of Lauson tractors : 

15-30 Lauson road-building 
tractor, reduced from $2,525 to 
$2,225; 15-30 farm tractor, $2,285 
to $1,985; 15-25 road-building 
tractor, $2,225 to $1,925 ; 15-25 . 
farm tractor, $1,985 to $1,685. 
The new Lauson 12-25 tractor 
which was placed on the market 
this spring has been reduced by 
$100 and now sells at $1,495. 



More Price Reductions 



Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chi- 
cago, has made the following 
reductions in its "Z" type gaso- 
line engines: V/t h.p., $22.50; 
3 h.p.. $27.50; 6 h.p., $45. 

A reduction of approximately 
15 per cent on its line of mold- 
board tractor plo'ws and 'tractor- 
drawn grain drills has been an- 
nounced by the La Crosse Plow 
Co., La Crosse, Wis. 

Deere & Co., Moline, 111., have 
announced a reduction of approx- 
imately $200 in the list price of 
the Waterloo Boy tractor in the 
U.S., and also a reduction of 
approximately 15 per cent on the 
following o'ther items in the line : 
Wagons, hay tools, hay presses, 
two makes of tractor plows, 
stationary engines. 



Plow Company May Re-enter 
Canada 



A report from Toronto states 
that a member of the foreiern 
sales department of the Moline 
Plow Co., Moline, 111., visited that 
city recently with a view to open- 
ing a sales branch in Eastern 
territory. The Moline line has 
hitherto been marketed in Eas't- 
ern Canada by the Willys-Over- 
land organization, but in future 
will be handled directly by the 
Moline Plow Company it is 
stated. The machine will be dis- 
tributed by dealers at various 
points throughout the country. 

As our readers are aware, the 
Moline Plow Co. formerly had 
branch houses in Western Can^ 
ada, but closed these when they 
discontinued operations in West- 
ern territory. 



British Tractor Firm Wants 
Canadian Manufacturer 



A British engineering firm 
wishes to get into communication 
with Canadian manufacturers 
Avho are prepared to undertake 
the manufacture of' a patent farm 
tractor under Canadian patent for 
both domes'tic and export trade. 
The features of this tractor, it is 
stated, are different from those 
of any other make. The name 



and address of the makers of the 
tractor, with a descriptive cata- 
logue and poster, are on file a't 
the Department of Trade and 
Commerce, Ottawa (quote File 
No. 19025), and available to in- 
terested Canadian manufacturers. 



Engine Company Held Annual 
Meeting 

The annual report of Manitoba 
Engines, Ltd., Brandon, manu- 
facturers of farm machinery and 
equipment, which was presented 
at the recent annual meeting pro- 
vides interesting sidelights on an 
industry which means much to 
Brandon in particular and the 
Wes't in general. During the past 
seven years this concern has paid 
$430,467 to its employees in 
Brandon and last year the com- 
pany's sales totalled approxi- 



mately $160,000. Despite the 
many handicaps which the un- 
certain conditions prevailing last 
year caused, the company made a 
very satisfactory showing, net 
profits 'totalling $4,811. The as- 
sets of the company now total 
$160,525 and paid up capital 
amounts to $36,800. The officers 
of the company for 1921 are: Dr. 
John McDiarmid, president; P. 
M. Ames, managing director ; 
directors: A. R. McDiarmid, John 
R. Little, G. S. Christie, John 
Wulfrum and E. Weller, all of 
Brandon. 



Annual Meeting of Avery 
Company 

At the annual meeting of the 
Avery Company, Peoria, 111., held 
recently, the. following directors 
were elected : J. B. Bartholo- 



mew, R. G. Boynton, G. L. 
Avery, E. R. Bowen, A. Y. Barth, 
Major Nelson, H. A. Rumsey and 
George J. Jobst. At a mee'ting 
of the directors the former ofificers 
were re-elected, as follows : Presi- 
dent, J. B. Bartholomew; vice- 
president, R. J. Boynton ; treas- 
urer, E. A. Cole; secretary, G. L. 
Avery. 



Distributing Fiat Tractors 



M. A. Kennedy & Co. Ltd., 
106-110 Richmond St. West, Tor- 
onto, have been appointed Can- 
adian distributors of the Fiat 
tractor, as manufactured by the 
Fiat Motor Co., Turin, Italy. 
The Toronto concern are now 
allotting dealers' territory. The 
Fiat tractor is a quality machine, 
of very superior workmanship 
and design. 




i m 



HARD THIS 
WAY, BUT- 




EASY ON A 
TRACK THE 
CLETRACWAY 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Horsepower — 12 at draw-bar, 20 at belt- 

pullejr. 
Length — 96 inches. 
Width — 50 inches. 
Height — 52 inches. 
Weight — 3,455 pounds. 
Turning Circle — 12 feet. 
Traction Surface — About 800 square inches. 
Centre to Centre of Tracks — 38 inches. 
Belt - Pulley — Diameter 8 inches, face 6 

inches. 



Cletrac is the ideal tractor for Canada. It 
makes the most of our short seasons and means 
bigger crops and more profit-money for every 
buyer. 

Cletrac is the tank-type tractor. There is 
nothing else like it — nothing to take its place. 
Cletrac does more kinds of work more days in 
the .year. Every farm, big or small, needs a 
Cletrac. Every farmer is a Cletrac prospect. 
Our increased production makes certain that 
there will be plenty of Cletracs for all dealers 
this year. Our enlarged plant is big enough 
to meet every demand. 

And Cletrac is backed by the biggest advertis- 
ing campaign we have ever put on in Canadian 
farm papers. Don't forget that. 
We have a gilt-edged proposition for good 
dealers. Let us tell you about it. Ask for our 
book, "Selecting Your Tractor." 

The Cleveland Tractor Company 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Home Office: 21 Ottawa St., Montreal 
Western Sales Office: 261 Fort Street, Winnipeg 



24 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Alberta Hart -Parr Dealers 
Held Meeting 



Very successful dealers' meet- 
ings were held by the Hart-Parr 
Company during the first week of 
March, at Calgary and Edmon- 
ton, with a total at'tendance of 
about seventy-five dealers from 
the Province of Alberta alone. 

The Hart-Parr distributor for 
Alberta is the Alberta Hart-Parr 
Company, of Calgary, which is 
also known as United Engine and 
Threshers Limited. This is a 
Canadian corporation, composed 
of T. R. Sco'tt, Mr. Norton,' G. P. 
Winchell and A. D. Martyn. In 
addition to their Calgary office 
and storeroom they have a branch 
at Edmonton which is in charge 
of Mr. McDonald. In addition 
to handling Hart-Parr tractors 
and tractor-^drawn implements, 
they do quite a large jobbing 
business in accessories for the 
automotive trade. 

Conditions in Alberta are good 
this spring and the dealers look 
for a fair business. Two days 
were spent in general sales and 
service instruction so that every 
dealer would thoroughly under- 
stand the Hart-Parr system of 
merchandising tractors. A large 
amount of business was trans- 
acted by 'the Alberta Hart-Parr 
Company at these conventions. 




tables and the motor clamps can 
be adjusted to size of motor. The 
clutch is an extra heavy toggle 
type, driving through a silent 
chain, which is noiseless in opera- 
tion. The machine can be oper- 
ated by 20 h.p. which is ample 
to run it to capacity with the 
largest motors. Full details may 
be had from the manufacturers. 



A Handy Machine for the Garage or Anto and Tractor Repair Shop 



The Hart-Parr Company was rep- 
resented by J. P. Gregg, Canadian 
sales manager, and D. E. Darrah, 
manager of sales promotion. 



New C-0 Universal Burning- 
in Machine 



A device which will be of direct 
interest to the garage owner and 
automobile and tractor repair 
man is the Universal burning-in 
and running-in machine, designed 
and built by the Canedy-Otto 
Mfg. Co., Chicago Heights, 111. 

The manufacturer claims for 



this machine that it will posi- 
tively burn-in and ruh-in the 
bearings of any type motor. Only 
one attachment is required and 
this is needed only for burning-in, 
valve-in-the-head V-type motors. 
It is quickly attached and comeg 
as part of the regular equipment. 
This attachment will also handle 
motors which do not have de- 
tachable heads, an operation 
Avhich has puzzled the repair man 
for many years. The table is 
raised and lowered by a single 
control. This table is grooved 
like all high class machine tool 



Handling the Waterloo Line 



Monarch Tractor Sales, Ltd., 
146 Princess street, Winnipeg, 
have been appointed Winnipeg 
sales agents for the full line of 
the Waterloo Mfg. Co., Portage 
la Prairie. They will carry 
"Champion" threshers, Heider 
tractors, Rock Island plows and 
disc harrows, Eagle tractors, etc. 
The Winnipeg concern will sell 
the Waterloo line in territory 
north, south and east of. Winni- 
peg- 



Truck Co. Prosperous 



The International Motor Truck 
Co., New York, shows that the 
company sold 7,020 trucks in 
1920, valued at $34,071,366. The 
total assets of 'the company on 
December 31 were $33,000,000. 
CuiTent liabilities are less than 
the cash on hand. 



With this Sort of Adver- 
tising we are helping the 
Agent to Sell TITAN— 
for Economy in a Doubtful 
Year 





T THIS WRITING it would seem that in the year 1921 many a 
man who now uses horses will have to plan with utmost care 
in order to keep a margin of profit in sight. He will have to 
make radical cuts in costs of production, and that means a 
reduction in the items of man and horse-power. These are by far the 
largest items in farm operating costs. Here the easiest and greatest 
reductions are possible by investment in proved tractor power. 

Seventy-five thousand Titan 10-20 owners are plowing, disking, 
seeding, and harvesting with les^help and in much less time. They are 
in a position to farm several acres now for every acre they formerly 
handled with horses, and they make a larger profit from every acre. Their 
Titans give them two-fold power for year-round service in belt as well as 
at drawbar. 

This company has put Titan 10-20 tractors successfully at work on 
many thousands of farms. Building on nearly a century of close rela- 
tionship with farmers and farm problems, we know that the tractor is 
just as sure of predominance as the automobile and motor truck. 

The Canadian farmer will not long be tied down to dependence on 
animal power alone. Do you believe that men who have been farming 
with Titan tractors will go back to the extravagance of horse farming 
in 1921 ? No matter how low the price of animals and feed, the horse 
cannot furnish the most economical power for farming. That is 
being demonstrated on every hand. We believe that Titan owners 
in your neighborhood will cheerfully recommend the Titan 10-20, 
the world's standard three-plow kerosene farjn power unit. ^ See 
the nearest Titan agent. 

International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA -^To 
HAMILTON CANADA 

WESTERN BRANCHES -BRANDON. WINNIPEG, MAN.. CALGARY. EDMONTON^ LETHBRIDGE, ALTA.. 
WESTERN SR'^'^^^^^y^^ BATTLEFORD. REGINA. SASKATOON. YORKTON. SASK. 

EASTERN BRANCHES - Hamilton. London. Ottawa Ont,. Montreal. Quebec. Que.. St. John. N B. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



2.5 



Canadian-made Motor Trucks 



Frank W. Ruggles, in the early 
days of the motor truck industry, 
saw that the big need of Canada 
was for a rugged, dependable, 
long-lived truck — a truck that can 
be sold at a reasonable price. 
The new Ruggles truck is de- 
signed primarily to give the long 
life of reliable performance here- 
tofore expected from the most 
expensive machines, but to offer 
these qualities at a reasonable 
price. 

With their immense manufac- 
turing facilities, the Ruggles 
Motor Truck Co., London, Ont., 
have entered quantity production 
in a way that assures low price 
and quality construction. Their 
trucks are powered by a 4-cylin- 
der Continental L-head motor, 
with enclosed valves and remov- 
able heads. This motor shows 
unusually low gasoline and oil 
consumption. Ignition is by the 
Bosch high-tension equipment, 
and the Stromberg carburetor is 
provided as regular equipment. 
The radiator is of special Rug- 
gles design. Throughout Rug- 
gles trucks Hyatt heavy-duty 
roller bearings absorb all shocks 
and vibration. The steering gear 
is of the double-threaded screw 
and half-nut type. Transmission 
is the Brown-Lipe, 3-speed unit 



type, with Chrome-nickel steel 
case hardened gears. The rear 
axle shows the Clark internal 
gear drive — a most efficient appli- 
cation for power. The power is 
applied to the rim of the rear 
wheels. Made in 1>4, 2>4 and 
3^-ton sizes Ruggles motor 
trucks should be in good demand 
in the farm districts and small 
towns throughout the West. The 
Breen Motor Co., Winnipeg, are 
distributors for Ruggles trucks in 
Winnipeg and district. 

Fiat Tractor Specifications 



Following are 'the specifications 
of the Fiat farm tractor, manu- 
factured in Turin, Italy, and sold 
in Canada by M. A. Kennedy 
Ltd., Toronto. The Fiat is 
named the model 702, and the 
price c.i.f. New Yofk is given as 
$3,200. 

Horse power — 18-25; 4 cylin- 
ders ; bore 105 millemeters ; stroke 
180 millemeters. 

Draw bar pull — First speed, 
5,520 lbs.; second speed, 3,750.; 
third speed, 2,540 lbs. 

Approximate weight — 5,300 
pounds. 

Average r.p.m. — 900. 

Total length— 126 inches; 
wheel track, 53 14 inches; wheel 
base, 69 inches; minimum turn- 
ing radius, 120 inches. 




^ Dealers I 



Your Customers will 
soon be in want of a 
new Pump for Spring. 
Are you stocked with 
an assortment so that 
you can give them 
good service and a 
GOOD PUMP? 

If not, let us ship you 
half a dozen or more. 

Liberal Discounts. 

A Profitable Line for 
Dealers to Handle. 

Our Lines of Pumping Jacks and Iron Pumps are also 
meeting every demand in the West. 

Our Double-Acting Peters Pump and Special Deep Well 
Tubular Pumps are excellent sellers. 

Write for Catalog and New Price List just off the press. 

Manitoba Engines Limited 

BRANDON, MAN. 



W/ien writing advertisers mention "Canadian Farm 
Implements." 



Sell Tractor Tenders 

Every Tractor Owner is a Live Prospect 

It is estimated that there are over 36,000 tractors in operation in Western CanaHa. <r,-„in„ 
dealers an unequalled opportunity for business handling the TRACTOR TENDER^ 
Tractor owners have been waiting for this tender. Thev can hitch it hXYr,A . . 
drive to field unhitch tender, and they have a fuU suppl^f kerose^^ fnd nJi 

always at hand. No delay— an ample supply always read^ Kerosene, gasolme and o.l 
Every make of steel barrel or drum can be handled by this eauic- 
ment. Strong plates and steel bands hold barrel finnly m 
position. They cannot jar loose on the road. 

Fit all Makes of Steel Barrels 

The tilting lever 
moves barrels to 
any position. 

Ratchet locks 
barrels in place 
at any angle. No 
lifting; no fuel 
waste. One hand 
does the job in an 
instant. 





Automatic Tilt— Not a Drop is Wasted 



, , ,. DEALERS: 

Write for prices and literature. Get the agency and make money Thousands in 
NOW " R"^°"=ble price. Get a sarp"f on your floor- 



BUILT FOR SERVICE 
Wheels are all-steel, 50 
in. X 214 in. tire. Barrel 
holder plates are im- 
mensely strong. Fit and 
hold all makes of steel 
barrels. Tongue rack is ly^ in. 
X 5-16 in. steel. Tongue stand 
holds tender level when not in 
Heavy hardwood blocks 
separate barrels and assure 
solid clamping. Weight, com- 
plete, 275 pounds. 



Link Manufacturing Company 

Portage la Prairie, Man. 



FitlsBinsai.dCars^^ 



Do away with d isty inside scooping 
time, labor and uacks and get more 
for your grain by using the 

Liberty Grain Blower 

Elevates, cleans and (radesSOO to 
800 ba. an hour with 6 H. P. Only 
ONE moving part. No buckets, 
chains or gears. One man can 
mov* it. Costa half price of old- 
vty'o eleTators. 

FREE RnOK llliutnited. ez- 
ntt DUUR plains tliis greBl 
unprov«meot. Send name for copy. 
LINK MFC. CO. Dept. 708 
Portate la Prairie, Man. 




A cleaner and fanning mill combined. As a 
grader alone they pay for themselves on the 
first job done. Simple, light, immense 
capacity. Get our attractive sales offer at 
once. 



2(3 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April; 1921 



Overseas Implement News 



A\'. Rae, Rosehearty, .Scotland, 
has been appointed a special 
demonstrator for the Austin 
Mo'tor Co. He will tour Africa, 
Australia and Canada. 

Recently the Austin Motor Co., 
Birmingham, shipped 25 tractors 
to India, which market, says the 
company, will soon absorb 10,000 
Austin tractors a year. 

A. Dugdale, Ltd., London, 
have been appointed British dis- 
tributors for the OtAvell mower, 
a power . mower for use with 
Fordson tractors, manufactured 
in America. 

It has been officially estimated 
that France needs 25,000 tractors. 
The domestic production of trac- 
tors in that country is only 2,500 
a vear, but even that number can- 
not be sold. 

A report states that the Ford 



Motor Co. intend to manufacture 
Fordson tractors in Germany. 
An annual output of 20,000 trac- 
tors is aimed at, it is stated. The 
price of the tractor will be about 
$500 to $650. 

The Power Farm Machinery 
Co., Coventry, England, are 
marketing a new farm power unit 
for Ford cars. The power is 
taken from the engine shaft, the 
starting handle being removed. 
A governor control to the engines 
is also provided. 

The Implement & Machinery 
Review, London, reports that 
tractor trade in Great Britain is 
slow, farmers not being disposed 
to buy because grain prices are 
on the down-grade. British trac- 
tor makers are looking for trade 
in the Far East. 

H. Pattison & Co., Streatham, 
London, have developed a new 
potato planter that will plant 



three rows of potatoes, with two 
other sizes to handle two and four 
rows. The spacing may be any- 
thing from 12 to 24 inches. The 
three-row machine can be drawn 
by one horse. 

Our British contemporary gives 
some particulars of the prices 
now obtaining for British tractor 
plows and cultivators. A Chippen- 
ham firm have lowered their 
prices on two-fu-rrow plows -to 
$197.50, and for three-furrow, 
$247.50. Seven and nine-tooth 
cultivators are quoted at $192.50 ; 
eleven-too'th cultivators at $200. 

This year the British tractor 
trials will be held during fall, at 
Shrawardine, near Shrewsbury. 
There will be no class for steam 
cable outfits, but a section for 
small garden tractors will be 
added. Direct haul and cable 
outfits operating by internal com- 
bustion motors will be tested. 




Dealers ! 



"WILKIE RINGS 



FOR 



Cars, Trucks, Tractors 
and Stationary Engines 

Save Gas 
Increase Power 
Reduce Oil Consumption 

The Demand Proves Their 
Quality. Lay in a Stock. 

Consider the Power Lost in Your Territory 

Help your customers say good-bye to carbon, pre-ignition, knocking, loss of power and similar engiile troubles 
How many internal combustion engines right in your district are stealing money from their owners? Sell 
them Wilkie Rings — they solve the problem. 

Wilkie Piston Rings are manufactured from single cast, close grained, properly proportioned materials. Lap 
joint type; perfectly round. Do not distort. As near perfect as modern machinery and brains can produce. 

EVERY RING CARRIES AN UNCONDITIONAL GUARANTEE 



In sizes from 3^ x ^ inch to 6 x ^-inch, and up. Standard 
sizes in width and diameter. Larger sizes quoted on request. 
Shipped in cartons; properly labelled. You select the size 
required in a moment. 

There will be a heavy replacement demand for rings this 
season. Are you prepared to profit by it? Stock Wilkie 
Rings and create satisfied customers and increased business, 

WRITE FOR PRICES, PARTICULARS AND 
TRADE DISCOUNT TO 



"FORD" SPECIALS IN A 
NEAT SHOW CASE 

Contains 100 rings, of which 24 are 
standard, the balance graded in six 
oversize lots. Each size in separate 
compartment with size plainly shov. n. 
Reasonable price — a real business- 
builder for the dealer. 



WINDSOR MACHINE AND TOOL WORKS 



86-88 PITT STREET WEST 



WINDSOR, ONT. 



The implements to be tested will 
include tractor plows, cultivators 
and disc harrows. 

In Great Britain, binder-twine 
manufacturers made an agree- 
ment with dealers that if lower 
quotations were in force after 
October first, last-year orders 
previously placed at higher values 
would bear a refund of the differ- 
ence. The twine factories lowered 
their price $20 a ton during Feb- 
ruary, to the benefit of the trade. 
Large steam plowing contractors 
in Britain report a heavy demand 
for contract plowing. They 
claim that the farmer in that 
country is not satisfied with the 
work of the gas tractor and finds 
up-keep expense and renewals 
very costly. 

Howard Ltd., Bedford, Eng- 
land, have adapted 'the self-lift 
principle to, a standard zig-zag 
harrow, for use with a one-man 
tractor outfit. Five harrow sec- 
tions are arranged about a three- 
wheel frame, two being pulled by 
side arms, one beneath frame and 
two behind to take out wheel 
tracks. By chain lift from 'the 
tractor the harrow teeth are lifted 
clear of the soil, carried over the 
dirt and dropped, permitting con- 
tinuous operation of the tractor. 
The manufacturers , state that 
they believe the chain harrow, 
used extensively in Great Britain, 
can also be adapted as a self-lift 
implement. 



Distributing Eagle Tractors 



The Waterloo Manufacturing 
Co., Portage la Prairie, with 
branches at Regina and Saska- 
toon, have secured the sole dis- 
tribution in Canada of the Eagle 
farm 'tractor, as manufactured by ' 
the Eagle manufacturing Co., of 
Appleton, Wis. 

Eagle tractors are made in two 
sizes, 12-22 h.p. and 16-30 h.p. 
The motors are twin-cylinder, 
horizontal, valve-in-head type, 
with Dixie H.T. ignition. With 
a long record of successful ser- 
vice in U.S. territory, the Water- 
loo organization should be as- 
sured a good demand for their 
new line from all over 'the Can- 
adian West. They are now 
appointing dealers throughout the 
territory. 



Sharpies Lower Prices 



The Sharpies Separator Co., 
West Chester, Pa., has announced 
a reduction of 20 per cent in the 
price of all standard Sharpies 
cream separators. This reduc- 
■ tion has been made, the company 
states, notwithstanding there has 
been only a slight decrease in the 
cost of production, but it is con- 
sidered advisable to anticipate a 
lower level of prices. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



27 



Manufacturing Piston Rings 



The Windsor Machine & Tool 
Works, Windsor, Ont,, manu- 
facturers of the famous Univer- 
sal cylinder re-boring tool, en- 
tered the piston-ring business in 
a big way some eighteen months 
ago. They are producing a full 
line of "Wilkie" piston rings in a 
remarkably wide variety of sizes, 
both standard and over-size types 
being produced. 

The Wilkie ring is made from 
single cast, close grained, prop- 
erly proportioned materials. The 
lap-joint type is adhered to, and 
with splendid machine-shop 
equipment the company report 
that their rings are as perfect as 
any product sold, with sufficient 
tolerance at all points to prevent 
distortion. Wilkie piston rings 
are made in sizes from 3}ix}i 
inch up. to 6xy2 inch, all standard 
sizes in width and diameter being 
produced. They also make a 
specialty of Ford rings in stan- 
dard and over-size patterns. 



Mower Attachment for Cletrac 



The Hullet-McCurdy Tractor 
Co., Kansas City, have developed 
a mower attachment for Cletrac 
tractors. It is stated that this 
attachment can be installed in the 
front end of the tractor in 30 
minutes. The power for oper- 
ating the sickle is taken from the 
engine pulley to the pitman wheel 
by a bel't, and a long pitman, 
always an advantage in a mower, 
must be used. The control levers 
are beside the operator on the 
tractor seat. 

The cutter bar is so attached 
that if it is driven against an un- 
yielding object it will shear a 
wooden pin in 'the yoke and allow 
the cutter bar to swing around 
parallel with the tractor and at 
the same time stops the sickle 
by lifting the belt idler pulley. 

This machine has been tested 
out 'thoroughly and has done 
satisfactory work in every case. 
The sickle being driven from the 
tractor belt pulley runs all the 
time the motor is running whether 
the tractor is moving or not. 
This feature assures against any 
clogging of the cutting mechan- 
ism. 



A Convertible Tractor 

The Racine Engineering Co., 
Racine, Wis., announce a new 
tractor that can be converted in 
connection with a standard trailer 
into a 2>^-ton motor truck. The 
tractor, which has a speed of 3^ 
m.p.h. is called the "Dodge". The 
tractor wheels can be removed 
and replaced by rubber tired 
wheels, the trailer being mounted 



behind to form a motor truck 
with a speed of 18 m.p.h. 

The Dodge is a 3-4 plow trac- 
tor, 90-inch wheel base, weight 
4,200 pounds. Motor is 4>^x6, 
Midwest. Transmission, three 
speeds forward and one reverse, 
separate speed for belt pulley. 
Motor speed, 1,000 r.p.m. Belt 
pulley, 15-inch diameter by Syz- 
inch face. 



Aspinwall Potato Machinery 



Bradstreet and Dun are two 
fortune tellers who will never be 
arrested. 



L. A. Aspinwall began to de- 
velop the potato planter in 1861, 
and for 21 years experimented 
and perfected his potato planter 
which finally got into quantity 
production at Trenton, N.J., in 
1883. The following year the 
Aspinwall Mfg. Co. was organ- 
ized at Three Rivers, Mich., and 
later moved to Jackson, Mich., 
where for 36 years the company 
have been manufacturing the 
Aspinwall line of potato cutters, 
planters, sprayers, diggers and 



sorters. Canadian business is con- 
trolled by the Aspinwall Can- 
dian Co., which was established 
at Guelph, Ont., over 14 years 
ago. The Canadian organization 
is under the management of L. 
Jacques, who has been with the 
company for 22 years. 

Although nearly seventy-nine 
years old, Mr. Aspinwall is still 
actively engaged in perfecting 
new potato machinery to be 
added to the line. 



The s,team that blows the 
whistle is nothing but hot air. 



Important Announcement to Dealers 



THE WATERLOO MANUFACTURING CO. Ltd. 
Portage la Prairie, Man, have concluded arrange 
ments with EAGLE MANUFACTURING CO. 
Appleton, Wis., for the exclusive sale in Canada of 

EAGLE TRACTORS 

12-22 H.P. and 16-30 H.P. 
Simplest Tractors Built 

Simplicity of design, ease of operation, 
reliability and durability — that's Eagle Trac- 
tors. Fewer parts to wear — fewer parts to 
repair. Note the illustration — the large, wide 
belt pulley, just Where it belongs. 

Read the Specifications 

12-22 H.P. — Motor: Twin cyl., horizontal, valve-in- 
head; 7-m. bore, 8-in. stroke, 425-450 r.p.m. High 
tension Dixie magneto with impulse starter; Schebler 
carburetor; force feed lubrication to cylinders and pistons 
heavy-duty roller bearing. Speed. 2 and 3 m.p.h Belt 
pulley 20-in. by 8i4-in. face. Fuel, Kerosene or Gasoline 

16-30 H.P. — Motor: Twin cyl., horizontal, valve-in-head- 
8-in. bore, 8-in. stroke, 425-450 r.p.m. High tension Dixie 




magneto with impulse starter; Schebler carburetor; force feed 
lubrication to cylinders and pistons, Hyatt heavy-duty roller 
bearings. Speed, 2 and 3 m.p.h. Belt pulley, 20-in. by 10-in. 
face. Fuel, Kerosene or Gasoline. 



Waterloo " Champion Separators 

20x36 24x36 24x42 28x42 33x52 36x56 and 40x62 



Guaranteed 
Grain 
Savers 



Assure clean, speedy and efficient 
threshing under all conditions. A range 
of sizes to suit every demand. Equipped 
complete with wind stacker, feeder, 
wagon loader and» register. 



Rock Island Tractor Plows and Discs 





"Rockllsland" 
Held er Tractors 

12-20 H.P. 

Equipped with heavy four-cylinder 
motor. Patented friction drive — seven 
speeds forward or reverse, with one lever, 
all on one motor speed. No gears to 
strip; 15 to 20 per cent fewer parts. 

Our Line Includes 

Kerosene and Gasoline Tractors. Plows, 
Portable and Traction Steam Engines, 
Separators, Wind Stackers, Baggers, 
Threshers' Supplies, etc. 



Get our Liberal Sales Offer 

Jhf Waterloo Manufacturing Co. Limited 

"^'^^'^A PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE 



Alberta Distributors: United Engines & Threshers Ltd., Calgary and Edmonton 



SASKATOON 



28 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



The Hardwood Lumber Industry 

By C. M. Ackland, Manager Lumber Department 
D. Ackland & Son Ltd. 



In the farm equipment trade 
the dealer has naturally felt the 
great increase in price of hard- 
woods, as shown in implement 
sets, whiffletrees, doubletrees, 
wagon and vehicle parts, etc. In 
many items of farm equipment 
hardwood plays a most important 
part, and advances in price of 
such equipment have been due, in 
part, to the higher cost of the 



common hardwoods being used. 

Hardwood production begins 
with the forest and 'timber owner- 
ship. The firm cutting the tim- 
ber may not own the land, but 
must secure timber rights. When 
cut, the product may be logged, 
then transported from forest to 
mill. Formerly cutting took 
place close to rail service. As 
areas were denuded of timber, a 



longer haul became necessary to 
the railways. Teams, light rail- 
ways, trucks and tractors are now 
parts of the equipment required 
for this work. After cutting, the 
timber is not in, shape to saw for 
at least six months. When fin- 
ally sawn it goes from the mill 
to the wholesaler or factory, and 
thence, as stock or finished prod- 
uct, to the retail merchant. 

If labor is high priced, the cost 
of hardwood stock is correspond- 
ingly high, and vice versa. To 
locate the stock, timber "cruisers" 
have to be engaged, and these 



are high-priced experts who cover 
the forest and size up every tree, 
estimating 'the probable grade of 
the stock and the quantity avail- 
able in the territory to be cut. 
Weather conditions are an im- 
portant factor, also location of 
the timber. If the timber is on 
high land it can be readily cut 
and logged the year around. If 
on low land, weather conditions 
may make logging impossible for 
a large part of the year. 

Higher Operating Costs 

Formerly, in the hardwood 
areas, many negroes were' em- 
ployed at a reasonable wage 
scale, but like other labor the 
negro has an enhanced idea of 
his value, with resulting in- ' 
creased wage outlays. The per- 
sonnel of the hardwood produc- 
tion force includes many high- 
priced experts and executives, 
such as: ^Foresters, survey men, 
timber estimators, sawmill engin- 
eers, industrial managers, equip- 
ment experts, accountants, traffic 
managers, advertising and sales 
departments, salesmen — and be- 
yond all, high priced labor in- 
cluding sawyers and filers. 

Villages have to be built, huts 
erected and stores opened for 
supply of necessities to the men. 
Therefore, primary production 
cost is no small matter, but all 
of us are more or less liable for 
the present high cost of hard- 
woods. 

The dealer in farm equipment 
naturally thinks that this indus- 
try is the main factor in hard- 
wood demand. It is not ; in fact, 
is but a small market for the 
available product. Prosperity has 
had a great efifect upon hardwood 
values. In any one family, now 
married -and settled how many 
gramaphones do-you find? Prob- 
ably one in every home. That 
means an increased hardwood 
demand. With high wages labor 
has invested heavily in good fur- 
niture — ^which means more hard- 
wood demand. 

Supply Below Normal 

The. average mill has to cut its 
supply of logs from the middle of 
September to the end of October, 
or at latest the middle of Novem- 
ber. The length of the season 
depends upon when rains set in 
in the cutting territory. As we 
knoAV, last fall hardwood users 
did not place orders owing to 
unsettled conditions. As a result, 
the mills only cut to meet the 
"visible demand". They decided 
upon a small cut, as Idgs cannot 
be cut to let lie so that worms 
destroy 'the stock— especially in 
the case of hickory. 

The cut for this season's re- 
quirements, as a result, was only 
about 40 per cent of normal. If 
the demand for hardwood reaches 



Dtlassey-Hartris 

Outstanding Features of 

Massey-Harris Cream Separators 

Mean Many Sales for the Live Dealer 



HE MASSEY-HARRIS CREAM SEPARATOR saves 
from ten to fifteen dollars a year per cow over the 
old methods of separation and furthermore it 
saves several dollars a year per cow over inferior separators. 

Both the cream and skim-milk have clearly defined 
separate courses— there is no re-mixing after separation, 
which takes place quickly and surely. 

Three outlets carry away the skim- milk quickly— 
there is no back flow. 

A thick cream can be run without clogging, because 
the cream screw adjustment regulates the cream density 
without reducing the size of the cream outlet. 

Only on the Massey-Harris Cream Separator are- 
there six V-shaped openings in the split wing extending 
from top to bottom— the milk is spread uniformly over 
every disc and before delivery to the discs is speeded 
up, thus the bowl runs freely and is not slowed down 
by having to speed up the milk. 

Also in the Massey-Harris Separator we find die- 
cast split wing made of rust-proof metal; pressed steel 
discs with spacing calks welded into place; bowl separate 
from the spindle; positive lubrication with the double 
oiling system; a ball clutch that takes hold instantly; 
and a really reliable speed indicator. 

The Massey-Harris Cream Separator is easy 
to sell, easy to fill, easy to turn, easy to clean 

MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

(ESTABLISHED 1847) 

HEAD OFFICE - TORONTO, ONT. 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



29 



even 50 per cent or 60 per cent 
of normal, a shortage is the re- 
sult. Then a wholesaler, for ex- 
ample, gets a demand for five 
cars. He cannot locate the stock, 
so offers a higher price than 
market quotations. We immedi- 
ately have buying on a strongly 
competitive market, firms out- 
bidding one another to get the 
stock and up goes prices. This 
is another factor in the price situ- 
ation in addition to increased 
production cost. 

Let us recollect the fact that 
the estimated average cost of 
producing hardw^ood in 1914 was 
$22 to $25 per thousand. In 1920 
this had risen to from $46 to $50 
per thousand. In addition, 
freight rates have advanced by 
a great percentage, and the Can- 
adian wholesaler has. the factor 
of a high exchange rate to still 
add to the landed cost of the 
stock. 

The Future Supply Situation 

Figures show 'that at the com- 
mencement of the year, in the 
United States, only 10 per cent 
of the hardwood lumber mills 
were in opera,tion, and those were 
only showing 13 per cent of their 
normal production. A gradual 



reduction of labor cost is evident, 
but this is necessarily a slow 
process, and so far labor cost is 
more than off-set by decreased 
sales and higher overhead ex- 
penses. The export situation is 
opening up to some extent, as 
Germany and South America are 
placing orders, and also Belgium. 
Furniture manufacturers are one 
of the biggest markets in 'the 
hardwood trade, and this line is 
low on stock at present. If they 
begin to buy heavily, then we 
may expect further price ad- 
vances, owing to their great de- 
mand on a restricted supply. In 
comparison with most lines the 
vehicle and farm equipment trade 
shows but a small demand for 
hardwoods. 

Demand and supply decide 
prices and the dealer should re- 
member that in connection with 
hardwoods the freight rate and 
exchange alone on imported 
woods are equal to what the 
price of lumber was at the mill 
in 1914. It is es'timated that 
Canada and the United States are 
16 months behind in building re- 
quirements. Should people con- 
sider that the time is opportune 
to build, then the increased de- 



mand for hardwoods will assur- 
edly be reflected in increased 
prices for the product. 

It is true that the prices of 
hardwoods have had a bad effect 
upon the prices of buggies, demo- 
crats, wagons, etc., also on im- 
plement woods as half-finished or 
finished and painted, but it is 
equally true that the manufac- 
turer of such products, or the 
wholesaler, cannot be blamed for 
this. We simply confront a situ- 
ation where, for a start, the avail- 
able supply of timber is short of 
the demand, and where operating 
costs are greatly increased. In 
addition, the demand from inter- 
ests with an immensely greater 
consumption of raw material than 



the implement trade makes a 
buyer's market in which the lat- 
ter trade is a comparatively un- 
important factor. 

Granting this, it must still be 
considered that 1921 will be a 
heavy repair and replacement 
year in the vehicle trade. New 
jobs will not be purchased to any 
great extent, but repair woods 
and tiaiilage equipment should 
show a very profitable demand 
for the dealer. It is, therefore, 
a good policy for the trade to 
carry an adequate assorted stock 
of the lines for which they usu- 
ally have a demand, as business 
may be lost through inability to 
deliver the goods. 



Magneto Repairs and Replacements 




We carry in stock at all times BOSCH, BERLING, DIXIE 
and K-W Magnetos. 

Over 600,000 repair parts for all systems, and $20,000 
worth of special equipment enable us to give a 24-hour 
repair service on all makes and a real guarantee with 
each repair. 

Send for catalog to-day. 

Special terms to dealers. 

Acme Magneto & Electrical Co. Ltd. 

148 PRINCESS ST. : WINNIPEG, MAN. 

The Foremost Electrical Repair Shop in Canada 





G.S.M. EQUIPMENT LOWERS FARM COSTS 
AND INCREASES FARM PROFITS 

Decreased prices for farm products Will increase the demand for power equipment for 
the farm. More work must be done, in less time, at lower cost. Our goods meet the need 
tor ethcient, economical production. Canadian-made for Canadian trade. 

Beaver Tractors, "Ideal" Windmills. "Maple Leaf" Grinders, "Ideal" Kerosene 
Engines, Concrete Mixers, Steel Saw Frames, Power and Hand Pumps, Pumping Equipment, 
Steel Tanks. We also handle Plows, Threshers, etc. 

Type "K^^ Brantf ord Kerosene Engines 

Will Increase Your Prestige and Profits 

Three sizes: 2, 4 and 7 H.P. A size to suit every demand. Adaptable, reliable power; 
they have a remarkable record of enduring service. Better engines, and at a price that 
assures good business. Use the cheapest fuels. Speed change device; governor; magneto 
ignition. Fuel tank is built into engine base. Write for special engine literature and let 
us show you how you can double your engine trade. 



"Maple Leaf" Grinders Give 
Universal Satisfaction 

An economical investment for any farmer. Sell them 
to hook up with the Type "K" Engine. Our Grinders 
are strongly built and have remarkable capacity. Perfect 
adjustment for regulating fineness. End-thrust ball- 
bearings. Heavy shaft; flexible plates; adjustable shake. 
Runs smoothly and evenly at even the highest speeds. 
Get a sample on your floor. 



Double-Geared " Ideal " 
Pumping Windmills 

The most economical and efficient power pumping 
installation sold. Now is the time to line up your 
prospects. The Ideal has few working parts. Wide- 
faced special steel gearing. Roller and ball bearings 
assure operation in lightest winds. Automatic adjust- 
ment to wind. "Pull-in" design — they brake 
automatically. No chance of wrecking. Towers strongly 
braced and girted every 5 feet. 




The Beaver 15-30 —Canada's Leading Tractor 

Gives Power Service of Proven Dependability 

■T^^,,^"* Beaver, equipped with 4 cyl., 5 x 6%, special kerosene motor, is no ordinary farm power plant. It 
in 3^ f ™^ ""k 'r>''^ splendid performance in all haulage and belt work. Steady, resistless power— day 

in, day out— for every job. Develops SO H.P. on the belt. Ample capacity for heaviest threshing. The patented 



backs every claim w^ •^^'^^ n''^, fP'^^ll? t?'^*°'''"^^"u''? ^" ^"<i ^elt work. Steady, resisUess power-day 

7 .r..Z . ^ - D«^«'°P^ 50 H P. on the belt. Ample capacity for heaviest threshing. The patented 

ierkfn^- nerfert nt^of v,ork,ng parts 15 to 20 per cent."^ Smooth, positive clutch action. No 

jerking, perfect control. Heavy frame; extra strong wheels. Light and strong canopy. Built to stand up 
and give service under the most trying conditions. 5 f " 1.0 »iaiiu up 



Made in Canada. No duty — no exchange — reason- 
able price. Cash in on the Beaver 15-30. Secure 
territory now. Our special sales offer and liberal 
quantity discount will interest you. Write 



;»::"MiiiiiO 

liHHiiniHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiHinii^^ 



Goold Shapley& Muir Co. Limited 

Distributing Warehouses: Portage la Prairie, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon 

Factory— Brantford Western Head Office— Regina 



■ 




•30 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Electric Wheel Co. Produce New 
Tractor 



The Electric Wheel Co.,Quincy, 
111., manufacturers of the AUwork 
tractor, announce a new model, 
the All work II Tractor. This 
machine combines the features of 
high power, light weight and com- 
pact design. Its width is only 
54 inches, its height 55 inches. 
It is rated at 12-25, weight* 4,500 
lbs. and is stated to have 3-plow 
capacity. A three-speed trans- 
mission gives forward speeds of 
lj4' and 3}i m.p.h. Complete 
enclosure of all parts is provided 



and a direct drive with only two 
reductions to the live axle. The 
engine is four cylinder vertical, 
4^4x6 inches, with removable 
cylinder heads. Other fea'tures 
in design are a particularly com- 
plete equipment of anti-friction 
bearings. A Kingston carburetor, 
Kingston magneto and Bennett 
air cleaner are points in accessory 
equipment. 

In belt pulley location the All- 
work II shows a departure from 
common practice. The pulley, 
llx7-inch face, is mounted on the 
front of the tractor and is con- 
trolled by a separate twin-disc 



clutch, operated by a lever at the 
front of the tractor. The dis- 
tributors of the Electric Wheel 
Co. should find a good demand 
for the new 12-25 Allworik, espe- 
cially from farmers whose acreage 
calls for a two-three plow outfit 
that will operate at high speed. 



Develop Repair Service 



A New Binder Hitch 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER'S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
district. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



The Taco binder hitch is an- 
nounced by the Tractor Appli- 
ance Co., of New Holstein, Wis. 
It is stated that this company are 
now completing distributing ar- 
rangements for their hitches in 
Western Canada. This hitch 
works with the Fordson as well 
as other makes of tractors. It is 
made of steel, reinforced with 
wood, strong without being cum- 
bersome. ' The design permits 
adjustment so that any width of 
swath desired may be cut and 
maintains the same width of 
swath on curves as on straight 
sides without skipping or over- 
lapping. 



The greatest heroine in real 
life— Mother. 





Profits In Dairying Are Certain ! 

DEALERS : Secure New Records in Volume with 

"LISTER-PREMIER" BRITISH- 
BUILT CREAM SEPARATORS 

A MONEY-MAKER FOR BOTH FARMER AND DEALER 

Seven Sizes: Capacities : 220, 280, 350, 500, 650, 800 and 1000 lbs. per hour 

Simple in design. Finest mechanical finish. Short crank; easily turned. All 
moving parts run in oil. Gearing entirely enclosed. Aluminum discs cannot corrode. 
• Easy running — easily cleaned. A high-grade separator at a reasonable price, with 
skimming efficiency second to none. 

"LISTER"— The World's Leading Milker 

Simple — EfRcien t 



Send for full particulars of our 1921 model. Lister milkers 
tave been in use the world over for 16 years. Made in single 
or double units. The Lister Pulsator gives perfect release of 
the teats. Cups cannot fall off, and stroke of pulsator can be 
altered instantly to suit the individual cow. Operates by any 
XYi H.P. engine or motor Our special literature will interest 
you 



Lister Engines Mean Dependable Power 

British Built— British Quality 
2, 3, 5, 7 and 9 H.P. 





The biggest value in a farm engine you can handle. Reliable, economical; great reserve 
power High tension ignition. No batteries. Automatic lubrication. Shipped complete with 
skids, 'ready to run. Get a Lister on the floor and you will increase your engine business. 

The Lister Line Sells Easily and Profitably 

Secure our sales plan on: "Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene Engines, Grain 
Grinders and Crushers, Electric Lighting Plants, "Melotte" and "Lister-Premier" Cream 
Separators, Milking Machines, Churns, Ensilage Cutters, Silos, Sawing Outfits, Pumps, Pump 
Jacks, Power .Pumping Outfits, etc. 

Write for Catalogs and Sales Proposition 

R. A. LISTER & CO. (Canada), Ltd. 

WINNIPEG TORONTO 



While it may not be a highly 
profitable spring for the dealer, 
he must make every effort to pay 
expenses if he is to carry on. If 
new machinery cannot be sold in 
great volume, the demand for 
repairs should help the situation. 
Give the farmers repair service 
and make an adequate profit on 
this line. They are bound to 
come back for new goods sooner 
or later and they will be more 
likely to remember the dealer 
who gave good repair service 
than the man who made little 
efifort to supply them with parts 
and replacements. 



A New Remy Magneto 



The Remy Electric Co., Ander- 
son, Ind., announce a new Remy 
high-tension magneto for .tractors 
and trucks. This magneto is 
backed by the experience of the 
company in producing several 
million units of ignition appar- 
atus. The new magneto is dis- 
tinctive in design, has an im- 
pulse-starter coupling, and is said 
to be very reliable and efficient 
in every way. Interested dealers 
can obtain a descriptive booklet 
from the company. 



The Demand for Tires 



Do you ever stop to consider 
the value of tire trade in your 
territory. How many cars are 
in operation? Assuming that 
each car needs three new tires a 
year, what market would you 
have? 

It is stated that there are 
over 400,000 cars registered in 
Canada to-day. Each car has 
four tires, and they would aver- 
age one "spare" each. There are, 
then, some two million 'tires in 
actual use. 

Assuming that each car needs 
three tires a year, there is a re- 
placement demand of 1,200,000 
tires. The number of new cars 
manufactured and sold will be 
about 100,000, creating a further 
demand in 1921 for another 
500,000 tires. As a line, the tire 
is in good demand most of 'the 
time. 



Competition in Cream 
Separators 



L. A. Davis, U.S. consul at 
Helsingfors, Finland, announces 
tha't one of the largest manufac- 
turers of cream separators in Fin- 
land is preparing to manufacture 
and sell its products in the United 
States. This concern have an 
annual capacity of from 50,000 to 
60,000 machines and also produce 
spring harrows. 



April, 1920 



Canadian Farm Implements 




*7he (^mpiefeEIectricUihi.andPamrPJaiU fbr farms andCbimtry Homes 




j Money in Lighting Plants 



Adrantages of Electric Light 

Electricity is the best, safest, 
cleanest and most practical form 
of artificial light. Its rays are 
bright, steady and restful to the 
eye. Over 133,000 families are 
living in homes made better and 
brighter by Delco-Light. 



Some of the most progressive implement dealers 
in Western Canada have discovered that lighting 
plants taken on as a side line have become one of 
their best revenue producers and are now featuring 
them among their leaders. They attribute this to 
the fact that lighting plants, their advantages and 
various uses, have been widely advertised through 
The Nor'-West Farmer and other farm papers. 

Lighting plants naturally are a part of the imple- 
ment trade. In this country no one is better equipped 
to handle them than the implement dealer. The 
farmers throughout Western Canada know and want 
the comfort of a lighting plant in their homes. 
Advertising has sold the idea— you can sell the equip- 
ment. A demand exists for good reliable lighting 
systems and sales can be made wherever the prospect 
has the purchase price— these prospects are still 
plentiful. An agency for one of these well-advertised 
plants will prove a money-maker for you. 

Link your sales plans to the advertising in The 
Nor'-West Farmer. Subscription $1.00 per year. 



75,000 Voluntary 
Subscribers 



The Nof-West 

Farmer 



Th« Pioneer 
Farm Joum&l e-/ 
Western Canada 



WINNIPEG 
CANADA 



ROBINSON-ALAMO LIMITED 

140 Piincess Street, Winnipeg. Canada 




FARM ELECTRIC POWER AND LIGHT PLANT 





..n« buf on 



tedl 




Minuted 





DOMINION STEEL PRODUCTS CO. LIMITED 



Dep&rtme&t "H" 



BRANTFORD. CANADA 




32 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Motor Trucks and Accessories 



Automobile, Truck and 
Tractor Accessories 



By A.L.S. 



Have you spent any time 
reasoning out, the possibilities of 
making money in the automobile 
accessory business. A great per- 
centage of the trade are already 
successful in this. It has proven 
'to be a side line worth while. It 
will not cut in on the time you 
should spend on the implement 
business but will be a distinct 
service to your customers. Have 
you an agency for an automobile 
or motor truck? If not, you 
probably run a motor car. What 
do you find are the 'things that 
you constantly need? Gasoline, 
oils, greases, waste, spark plugs, 
electric bulbs, tires, inner tubes, 
patches, cement, chains, etc. This 
is only a partial list of essentials 
to a motorist in everyday use o'f 
the car, and excludes all tools for 
engine or car repair, all season- 
able articles, such as anti-freeze, 
radiator cement, hood covers, etc. 

Why not carry the essentials at 
least, and make it a side line. 
Window display is a simple mat- 
ter with these goods, and it is 
surprising how attractive they 
can be made. The jobber or 



manufacturer is only too glad to 
supply you publicity matter on 
the various lines which you sell 
and you in return are able to 
place it before your customers. 
In many cases, very elaborate 
cases and samples are made up 
which are so attractive to the eye 
that they are a strong selling 
force in themselves. 

Your customers come into the 



high to carry these essentials 
which are so necessary to every 
motorist, and the turnover of 
these will be surprisingly quick. 

Working hand in glove with 
the au'to accessory business is 
tractor supplies. A farmer buys 
a tractor from you and after a 
certain time finds that he has to 
get a new part, spark plug, per- 
haps, or piston rings. Does he go 
to the grocer or hardware man 
for the article? No, you sold the 
machine and you are 'the logical 
,man to sell the repair. This is 
where many implement dealers 




The farmer who bought a trac- 
tor last year, ' or two or three 
years ago is not going to scrap 
it and buy a ncAV one. But he is 
going to have to buy some new 
part probably. You are the man 
that he is going to deal with, and 
you should accordingly size up 
your district so that when your 
customers come around for these 
repairs you will have them in 
■ stock. A few tractor supplies 
that you could havei on hand are : 
Balls for bearings, belting, carbon 
removers, clutch lining, grease 
cups, fan belts, friction clutch 
pulleys, gaskets, radiator hose, 
piston rings, spark plugs and tool 
kits. The accessory game can be 
developed into a very active 
branch of your business, catering 
to your impilement customers 
steadily, and in no way detracting 
from your regular trade. Think 
it over in those times when fas't 
selling lines and quick turn-over 
are essential. 



Motor Truck Sales are Profitable for the Implement Dealer 



shop for an implement or a repair 
part, perhaps to get some infor- 
mation. They may remember 
that they require an inner tube, 
a valve cap, or some such thing 
when they see the article on 'the 
shelf or in a show case. The 
outlay need not be tremendously 



lose trade, in that they can't sup- 
ply the simple wants of the cus- 
tomer. What is thS result? He 
goes over to the hardware man 
or the garage man, buys his pis- 
ton rings, and 'the implement 
dealer bids good-bye to the acces- 
sory trade of that customer. 




DEALERS, DISTRIBUTORS 

At Last You can Secure a 
Proven Safety Hitch— The 

BELCHER TRACTOR 
HITCH 

ABSOLUTELY AUTOMATIC— A 
LOAD CONTROLLER, SAFETY 
HITCH AND SHOCK 
ABSORBER 

STOPS THE TRACTOR 

Breakage of tractor or implement absolutely 
eliminated. Adjustable to the load. Tractor 
stops immediately excess load is encountered. 
The only tractor hitch made with this ex- 
clusive, patented feature. Tested in the field 
— guaranteed to the limit. 

It Does Not Uncouple 
the Tractor from the Load 



Made for all Standard Tractors. Illustra- 
tion shows our Style A for the Titan 10-20 
h.p. It will sell to every Titan owner in 
your territory. Adds years to the life of 
both tractor and implements ; does away with 
95 per cent of all tractor troubles. Saves all 
excess and breakage strain. We can make 
prompt delivery. Complete literature supplied. 
Order AT ONCE. Handle this profit-maker 
this season. 



Get Prices and Folders 



Plow Works Place Truck 
on Market 



Write at 
Once to 



FRED. P. BELCHER. 



717 Grain 
Exchange, 



Winnipeg 



J 



The latest product of the J. I. 
Case Plow Works Co., Racine, 
Wis., is the J. I. Case two-ton 
farm motor truck, which is illus- 
trated and described in a new dis- 
play folder issued by the manufac- 
turers. T^he company have been 
perfecting this farm truck for 
two years and believe that i't in- 
corporates every feature the far- 
mer could desire. 

Belt Power Equipment 

A strong selling point, and one 
that adds greatly to the value of 
the J. I. Case truck, is the power 
'take-off. This device delivers 
practically the full power of the 
motor to' a belt pulley mounted 
directly in front of the radiator, 
so that the truck can easily be 
' lined up to belt-driven machinery. 
The truck will, 'therefore, thresh, 
saw wood, fill silos, grind feed, 
bale hay, etc. Under field test.it 
easily drove a 32-inch separator, 
fully equipped, threshing wet 
oats. 

The' frame is of 6 in., 8 lb. chan- 
nel, with the patented W allis U- 
frame as a sub-frame. The Wallis 
tractor motor used is 4j4x5M 
stroke, with removable cylinder 
head and sleeves. Ignition is by 
high tension magneto. Governor 
is hydrauHc type, and lubrication 
is combination pump and splash. 
The transmission is Wallis de- 
, sign, completely enclosed, with 
speed from 15 m.p.h. to 20 m.p.h. 
Torbensen front and rear axles 
are used, with roller bearings. 
The wood wheels have demount- 
able rims and Goodyear pneu- 
matic tires, 36x6 and 38x7 behind. 
The wheel base is 144 inches, 
truck, 59 inches. The chassis 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



33 



weighs 4,0(30 lbs. ; with body, cab 
and fuel, 5,500 lbs. With a s'take 
body the loading- space is 66x120 
inches, the cab being a weather- 
proof self-contained unit. Attrac- 
tively finished in battleship grey, 
the equipment of the J. I. Case 
farm tractor truck is very com- 
plete. Interested dealers can ob- 
tain full particulars of this new 
truck by addressing the head 
office of the company. 



Intarnational Motor Trucks 



In designing their line of motor 
trucks the International Har- 
vester Company, of Chicago, 
made long and exhaustive tests 
of various drives, such as chains, 
worms, bevels and internal gears. 
They finally decided that the in- 
ternal gear final drive was the 
most practicable, from the stand- 
point, of giving dependable ser- 
vice under all conditions of road 
and load. 

The company claim that for all 
uses the internal spur gear in the 
International axle has greater 
power efficiency than any other 
form of final drive — and its effi- 
ciency lasts. Sligh't wear, which 
has a tendency to destroy the 
efficient operation of other drives, 
does not impair the efficiency of 
the International. It operates, 
says the company, with the small- 
est amount of friction and tooth 
pressure and is very durable. If 
properly cared for, there is no 
limit to the mileage in an Inter- 
national rear unit. 

In the International final drive, 



the different gears and driving 
shafts are in front of the weight- 
carrying member. This construc- 
tion shortens the propeller shaft. 
It also causes the driving pinions 
to exert a lifting force when the 
truck is running forward. In 
other words, the gear before the 
axle tends to relieve the wheel 
bearings of weight, instead of 
over-loading them. The difiference 
is greater 'than it might seem at 
first thought and is a decided ad- 
vantage, particularly when the 
truck is compelled to pull through 
muddy or rutty roads or in heavy 
sand. 

The International drive applies 
the power near the rim of the 
wheel. Only one-fourth of the 
speed reduction is made in the 
differential. As a result there is 
only one-fourth the torsional 
strain on International wheels and 
driving shafts that there is on 
types where the power is applied 
at the centre of the wheel. 



Finnegan Appointed Sales 
Director 



W. E. Finnegan has resigned 
from the position of general sales 
manager of the G r a y - D o r t 
Motors, Limited, Chatham, and 
has been appointed general direc- 
tor of sales of The Ruggles Motor 
truck Company, Ltd., London, 
Ont. This latest addition to the 
executive of the Ruggles Com- 
pany is indicative of the determin- 
ation of this company to build 
up a sales organization that will 
inspire the same confidence as 



A BIG REDUCTION IN PRICE 

The same quality, construction, and service at the new 
price, enables you to produce more at a much lower cost. 
The "Gray" is now the best value on the market. 

WRITE FOR NEW PRICES AND TERMS. THEY 
ARE RIGHT 

Gray Tractor Co. of Canada 

LIMITED 

Office and Showrooms : 
LOMBARD STREET (opposite Grain Exchange), WINNIPEG 
Western Distributors: 
NORTHERN MACHINERY CO. C WARING CO 

Lethbridge and Calgary, Alta. Moose Jaw, Sask: 

■ THE TRACTOR CO. LTD., Saskatoon, Sask 



Yfill complete 60acres 
of seed bed in lOHrs. 




does the personnel of the factory 
and production departments. Mr. 
Finnegan's record as a sales ex- 
ecutive and organizer is well 
known and his host of friends in 
the automobile and motor truck 
business wish him every success 
in his new position. 



Rural Credits in Manitoba 



Money still talks, if you don't 
choke it to death. 



During- 1920 the rural credit 
loans in Manitoba exceeded $2,- 
039,000 of which amount $400,000 
were loaned for breaking. Of the 
total loans $195,000 were made 
for the purchase of stock and 
$202,000 for machinery. 



Advertise your lines locally. 



Tractor Plows at Pre-War Prices 

Lincoln" Tractor Gangs 
Two-Three Bottom Sizes 



With Rolling 
Coulter as 

Regular 
Equipment 




'PHONE OR WIRE US 

A real sales opportunity. We offer Lincoln Tractor Plows to the trade at a 
T^l^ Pf'"' below replacement value. You can get trade at the pHce we 

^'"k" t"'°u "^^^ instantly, making a two-bottom outfit 

Stubble or breaker bottoms. Plows of real quality and durlbility. Strongly buHt 
Quick screw adjustment for depth. Don't delay. Let us quote you on thPs barg^n 

We are the Only Firm now Selling 

Pulverizes, Packs and 

Mulches the Soil in ~ M The Original 

one Operation. m 
A size for every Farm. i 

1 "WESTERN" 




IT SAVES ALL THE 
MOISTURE 

PLOW PACKERS— 2 ft. 6in., two-furrow: 4 ft. 
SINGLE SECTION— 6, 8, 10 and 12 ft. sizes. 

THREE SECTION— 11, 15 and 21 ft. size. Wherever used they have given bigger 
sturdier yields and earlier harvests. Place your orders at once. 



three-furrow. 



SNAP PRICES ON AUTO ACCESSORIES ! 

A line for which every car owner is a prospect. Special prices offered to 
Clear stock on hand. Write for our quotations on Spark Plugs, for car or 
tractor; Sunderland Tire Pumps, Auto Jacks, etc. They'll sell on sight 




Dealers : Meet the Demand for— 

Lincoln Smut Cleaners 

Made in Two Sizes. 
Order Now 

Sold on a positive guarantee to 
prevent smut. Separate smut 
balls, wild oats, king heads, and 
all light seed from wheat, also 
wild oats and all light seed 
from barley. Grain is thor- 
oughly pickled, dried and elevated 
to wagon box. Automatic 
skimmer an exclusive feature. 
Strong, heavy construction. 
Large, rustless solution tanks. 

Cushman Motor Works of Canada, Limited 

Builders of light weight, high grade Gasoline Engines for all Farm Power Work 



DEPT. C.F., WHYTE AVE. AND VINE ST. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



34 



Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



Subscribers' 
Information Service 

Under this heading we will reply 
to enquiries from jobbers and 
dealers concerning the location of 
machine manufacturers, where re- 
pair parts may be obtained, etc. 
Endeavor always to give name of 
manufacturer. For immediate re- 
ply, enclose stamped, addressed 
envelope. Send enquiries to In- 
formation Department, CANADIAN 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, Winnipeg. 



J. McD., Sask.— The Monitor drill is 
manufactured by the Moline Plow Co., 
Moline, 111. You can get repairs for 
the John Watson Mfg. Co., Winnipeg, 
who carry all Moline repairs. Specify 
the niimbers on the ratchet castings so 
that thev can supply for the correct 
drill. 

R. A. M., Sask. — The Gale plow ias 
never been sold in Western Canada. 
The manufacturers are the Moore Plow 
& Implement Co., Greenville, Mich. 
Write them direct. 

W. C. R., Alta.— Plates P7 are for a 
Martin feed gTinder, as made by M. E. 
Martin, St. Louis Park, Minn. Write 
factoiy for new plates. 

S. Bros., Alta. — Bearing for disc har- 
row, numbered 2516R, is for 'an old type 
P. & 0. disc as made by the Parlin 
& Orendorff Co. You can get repairs 
from the nearest branch of the Inter- 
national Harvester Co. 

E. A. Alta. — Cultivator with parts V12 
and V26 is one of th Hayes line, made 
by the Hayes Pump and Planter Co., 
Galva, 111. Write the factory for re- 
placements. 

J. M., Sask. — You can obtain repairs 
for the Hoosier drill from the nearest 
branch house of the International Har- 
vester Company. 

J. H. McC," Man.— The John Deere 
Plow Co., Winnipeg, carry a stock of 
Kramer rotary harrows, which are also 
distiibuted by H. Rustad, 416 Corydon 
Ave. Winnipeg. 

W. H. T., Alta. — Emerson plow re- 
pairs are carried in Western Canada by 
the Anderson-Roe Company, which con- 
cein Jiave offices at both Saskatoon 
-and Edmonton. Write the nearest 
branch for parts you require. 

A. E. D., Sask. — "Superior" grain 
drills, as made by the American Seeding 
:\[afhiiie Co.. Springfielrl. Ohio, are 
handled in Western Canada by the Hart- 
Parr Co. of Canada, 47 Higgins Ave., 
Winnipeg. If they cannot supply you, 
address the Oliver Cliilled Plow Works, 
61.3 Washington Ave. S., Minneapolis. 

E. H., Sask. — ^With current costing 
.30 cents per k.-w. hour, the cost of 
operating your 2 h.p., 110-volt d.c. motor 
would be " as follows : The average 1 
h.p. motor uses % kilo watt per hour. 
You Mill be safe to calculate that your 
2-h.p. motor iwill use PA kilolwatts per 
hour, wliich would make your operating 
cost, at full loail. -l-.j cents l)er hour, or 
.'?4..50 per ten-hour day. We assume 
that vour motor would not be running 
at full load all the time. Your cost 
would be reduced as the load is reduced, 
as the operating cost of an electric 
motor varies directly with the load. 

E. W., Man. — Repairs for the Cletrac 
crawler-type, tractor can be had from 
the Cleveland Tractor Co. of Canada, 
261 Fort St., Winnipeg. 

C. P., Man. — There is no grinder with 
tlie trade name of "Winona". The re- 
pairs you quote are for a "Diamond" 
gi-inder, as made by the New Winona 
Mfg. Co., Winona, Minn. Write the 
factorv direct. 

E. 'a. K., Man.— Repairs for the 
Superior grain drill can be had from the 
Hart -Parr Co. of Canada, 47 Higgins 
Ave., Winnipeg. 

J. P. R., Man. — Repairs for the 
"Thompson" plow can be obtained from 
-the Thompson Plow & Engine Works, 
Beloit, Wis. The Indiana reversible 
road grader is manufactured by the 
Good Roads Machinery Co., Kennett 



Square, Pa. Write factory for parts 
in both cases. ' 

D. G., Man. — The "Brantford" is an 
old-type mower, now obsolete, which 
was formerly manufactured by Harris, 
Sons & Co. It may be possible to secure 
the neeessaiy parts by Avriting the 
nearest branch of the Massey-Harris Co. 

J. McL., Man. — You can procure re- 
pairs for Oliver plows from the Can- 
adian Oliver Chilled Plow Works, Re- 
gina. For Sharpies repairs, write the 
Sharpies Separator Co., Regina. 

S. M., Man.— The "Van Slack" is a 
brush breaker manufactured by the 
Edmonton Iron Works, Edmonton. They 
can give vou full information. 

R. C, Man.— Parts 2LC331, 4LC261 
and 4LC329 are for a Superior disc 
cultivator made by the Moline Plow 
Co., Moline, 111. Parts B775 are boxings 
for a Moline disc harrow. For parts 
address the John Watson Mfg. Co., 
Winnipeg. 



Hanover Manufacturing 
Lighting Plants 



The Hanover Utilities Corp., 
825 World Bldg., New York., 
commenced production on a Ij^ 
k.w. farm-lighting plant some 
three months ago. Their factory 
has a capacity of 30 plants a day 
and is now working at full pres- 
sure. The company state that 
their plant is very simple in de- 
sign and practically fire-proof. 
It will be sold through the dealer. 
The Hanover Utilities Corp. are 
also bringing out a new tractor 
cultivator which will sell at a low 



The generator is of the bi-polar, 
shunt-wound, ball-bearing type, 
with compound wiring for start- 
ing. The complete plant, engine, 
radiator, generator and switch 
board, weighs 435 pounds. Full 
particulars may be had from the 
makers. 



Increased Winter Comfort 
Their Ideal - 



The personnel of The Monitor 
Stove Company, Ltd., is a group 
of men whose goal is to establish 
real winter comfort in every 
home in the Dominion through 







C. F. McLAIN 
Manager 



J. MARSHALL KNOX 
OflSce Manager 



W. T. SHIBLEY 
Sales Dept. 



D W. McINTYRE 
Sales Dept. 



M. & R., Sask.— Part D70 is the right 
top half of a bearing box for the King- 
man old style disc harrow, which is no 
longer manufactured. You may be able 
to secure the part from Martin & Ken- 
nedy Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

J. C. B., Man. — The "Iowa" cream 
separator is manufactured by the Assoc- 
iated Manufacturers Co., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Machine and parts are carried by Wood- 
Vallance Co., Winnipeg. 

B. & Co., Sask.— The "Monitor" Sta- 
tionary engine is not handled in Can- 
adian territory. For repairs address the 
manufacturers, the Baker Manufacturing 
Co., Evansville, Wis. 

M. B. Co., Alta.— Tongue plate for 
sulky plow, part R48, is for a sulky 
made by Deere & Co., Moline, 111. Ftor 
part write tlie John Deere Plow Co., 
Calgary. 

H. A., Man.— The Reliance sweep 
crusher is manufactured by the Sand- 
wich Mfg. Co., Sandwich, 111. Write 
the factory direct for necessary parts. 
Champion mowers are now handled by 
B. F. Avery & Sons, Inc., of Louisville, 
Ky. Address the Minneapolis branch of 
the company. 



"MAX" OIL STORAGE SYSTEMS 




Western Steel Products Ltd., Winni- 
peg, recently issued a very interesting 
pamphlet descriptive of their Max oil 
storage systems, oil wagon tanks and 
oil barrels. Max underground storage 
systems are splendidly adapted for use 
of farmers and private garage owners. 
They protect the automobile or tractor 
owner against shortage at all times. 
ThosQ systems are made in three sizes, 
with capacities of 305, 435 and 750 
gallons. Western Steel Products also 
produce the Type 9 pump in conjunction 
with their underground storage system. 
Max tanks and barrels are made of 
heavy steel, oxy-acetylene welded, mak- 
ing them one-piece construction, and are 
painted with a heavy coating of 
Asphaltum, covered with a layer of 
sand. Full details may be had from the 
manufacturers. 



"Nothing succeeds like success." 
Nothing fails so completely as a 
man who starts out believing him- 
self a failure. 



THE CALORIC PIPELESS 
FURNACE 

price. It will pull one plow or 
a 2-row cultivator. 

Hanover lighting plants are a 
direct connected unit, with a nor- 
mal capacity of 1^^ k.w. at 1,250 
r.p.m. The engine is 4-cycle 
water cooled, 3>^x4j4-inch stroke. 
Ignition is by timer and coil or 
magneto. It is specially designed 
for using kerosene and is said to 
be very accessible in design. One 
gallon of kerosene will operate 
the plant for 4>4 hours, according 
to the manufacturers. Four 
horse power is developed for me- 
chanical work, a 4-inch pulley 
being provided; speed regulation 
from 400 to 1,300 r.p.m. is a 
feature. 



the installation of a most modern 
heating device — the Caloric Pipe- 
less Furnace. Headquarters of 
the organization is at 9 Richmond 
Street East, Toronto, and agen- 
cies are being rapidly established 
throughout all Canada. 

The Caloric Pipeless Furnace, 
which has met with great success 
in virtually every country where 
the winters are cold enough to 
make artificial heating necessary, 
is stated to be a leader in its 
field. There are to-day more than 
125,000 Calorics in use, and the 
simple construction, economy of 
fuel consumption, cleanliness, and 
guaranteed capability of warming 
buildings up to eighteen rooms to 
70 degrees in coldest weather, are 
features that find favor with deal- 
ers and users alike. 

The men conducting the Moni- 
. tor Stove Co. are C. F. McLain, 
manager; J. Marshall Knox, 
ofifice manager, and W. J. Shibley 
and D. W. Mclntyre, sales. 



Breen Will Handle Ruggles 
Trucks 



The Breen Motor Co. Ltd., 
Winnipeg, has made a cotitract 
with the Ruggles . Motor Truck 
Co., London, Ont., by which the 
Winnipeg firm will distribute 
the well-known line of Ruggles 
trucks, in 1>^, and 3>4-ton 
sizes, in the city and district. 
C. R. Carr, sales director for the 
London organization, visited 
Winnipeg and completed ar- 
rangements with the Breen 
Motor Co., 



April, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 




The famous Hart-Parr 30 

Three-plow Tractor 



The new Hart-Parr 20 

Two-plow Tractor 




The "cart-bef ore-the-horse" way 
of selling tractors 



Some manufapturers think that when they have 
so many dealer contracts and have their dealers loaded 
up with tractors, their work is done. That's the "cart- 
before-the-horse" way. 

Twenty years of tractor building and merchan- 
dising experience has taught Hart-Parr Company that 
the important fundamental is not selling to dealers but 
helping dealers sell. 

That's why the Hart- Parr dealers' contract is so 
desirable and why Hart-Parr dealers are so successful. 

Hart- Parr Company is organized on the dealer- 
help plan. We spend four times as much money helping 
our dealers sell as we spend in selling our tractors to 
dealers. 

The first item in helping the dealer make sales 
is to give him a tractor that will make good — ^but we go 
a step farther. We educate the dealer to be a good 
dealer and we teach him to educate, and help him 
educate, the farmer to be a successful tractor operator. 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE A HART-PARRTNER? 
WRITE TO-DAY FOR OUR PROPOSITION 

HART-PARR COMPANY 

Founders of the Tractor Industry 

37 1 Lawler Street Charles City, Iowa 



How Hart-Parr 
Helps Dealers 

A thoroughly successful tractor at a 
moderate price, built in two sizes — 
two-plow and three-plow. 

A tractor educational service for 
dealer and farmer. 

National Advertising Campaign in 
farm papers and a fifty per cent 
rebate on the dealer's local news- 
paper advertising. 

Sufficient territory to enable the 
dealer to get volume of sales. 

Liberal discounts, 

Personal help from our field men 
in sales and service. 

All backed by twent}' years' experi- 
ence in building and marketing 
tractors. 




Many of the old Hart- 
Parrs that plowed the 
virgin prairies of the 
Northwest are still In 
use today. The great 
grand-daddy of all Trac- 
tors was old Hart-Parr 
No. 1, built in ISOI. 




Canadian Farm Implements 



April, 1921 



The experience of building 
70,000 motor trucks is behind the 

Canadian Made 

RUGGLCS 

TRUCKS 

Frank W. Ruggles and the corps of engineers and designers associated 
with him in this Canadian enterprise have built and sold more than 
70,000 Motor Trucks during the past seven years 



STANDARD UNITS 

Continental Red Seal Motors 
Clark Internal Gear Rear Axles 
Brown-Lipe Transmissions 
Stromberg Carburetors 
American Bosch Magnetos 
Extra Heavy Hydraulic 
Pressed Steel Frames 



STANDARD MODELS 

RUGGLCS Model 3, l}i Ton, Chassis, Seat 
and Solid Tires - - $2,845 

RUGGteS Model 4, 2}4 Ton, Chassis, Seat 
and Solid Tires - - $3,695 

RUGGLCS Model 5, 3>^ Ton, Chassis, Seat 
and Solid Tires - - $4,875 

F. O. B. LONDON, ONT. 



RUGGLES 1 Ton Rapid Delivery 

$2,300 

F.O.B. LONDON, ONT. 

equipped with standard express body, canopy top, 
pneumatic cord tires, electric lights, electric starter 
and horn, full length running boards 
and rear mud guards 





MADE IN CANADA 



"There's a RUGGLES for every purpose" 

Address Correspondence to Department 7 

Ruggles Motor Truck Company, Limited, London, Canada 



VOL. XVII., No. 5 


WINNIPEG, CANADA, MAY, 1921 


Bt7B8CRIPTION PRICE IN CANADa{ C(mfc 





Live Stock 

for Prince's Ranch 

No stock is too good for his Alberta ranch, accord- 
ing to the Prince of Wales, who has been sending 
over Dartmoor ponies, thoroughbred colts and 
fillies, and Suffolk chickens. 
The Prince's enthusiasm will make other ranchers 
keen to have equally fine stock. 
Our managers will be glad to discuss your farm 
financing with you. 

As the pioneer Bank of Western Canada we 
are bankers for the United Grain Growers, 
the United Farmers of Alberta and the 
Saskatchewan Co-Operative Elevator Company. 

UNION BANK OF CANADA 

Head Office : : WINNIPEG iss 



Reduce Your Fire CH^" 
Insurance Overhead by wUo\ 

Our Haxdware Companies have returned 60% of the premium 
paid (based on board rates) to United States Hardware and Imple- 
ment policy holders since 1908. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK, MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life Bldg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 
INSURANCE IN FORCE - - - - - - - OVER $274,00Q,000.00 

NET CASH SURPLUS ....... OVER $ 1,900,000.00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOMINION OF CANADA - - - - - $ 160,000.00 

REFERENCE: BANK OF MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 




The Wagon Loaded 
DISPLAY THEM AND THEY'RE SOLD! 

Known everywhere as the lightest, strongest and 
most practical wagon seats made. The only 
standardized seat; suits any wagon. Takes up no 
box space; low-set; protects driver from wind and 
gives full control over team. Carry 600 lbs. with 
ease. Order your wagons less seats and supply the 
Lloyds. Get a stock. Every seat sold sells a dozen. 

THEY FIT ANY WAGON OR SLEIGH BOX! 



Important to Dealers! 

The John Watson M'f'g Co. are now sole 
manufacturers and sales agents of the 
famous line of 

LLOYD'S LOW-DOWN 
SPIRAL SPRING WAGON 
SEATS 




Going Home 




Genuine Moline 
"ACME" Shares 

The original soft centre 
share. Give perfect 
wear. Order your 
stock now. 

Repairs for "Monitor'* Drills, Moline Plows and 

Moline Disk Harrows— Mandt Wagons and Farm Trucks— National and Mandt 
Manure Spreaders — ^Moline Engine Gangs— Adriance Binders, Mowers and Rakes. 



Also Repairs For 

Janesville Plows, 
Disc Harrows, etc. 

SEND us YOUR 
REPAIR ORDERS ^i311 




CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



Ronald-Smith Cultivators 




The Best Cultivator on this Continent 



IT GIVES UNIFORM CULTIVATION— This means a better seed bed. 
IT WILL NOT CLOG— Just think of it. 

IT HAS A SHEAR THAT WILL DO THE WORK— And a litUe moreL 
It has a frog to EupjJort the shear wing with quantity and quaUty of material that 
enables us to g^uarantee that it will stand up to the work you put it at and do that 
work with ease. 

Agencie* open Jar thU machine — Write before it it too late. 

Western Implements Limited 

6TH AVE. & SCARTH ST. - - .- REGINA, SASK. 



THE REPORT FOR 1920 

of The Great-West Life Assurance Company is 
now in print, and will be mailed to any interested 
person on request. 

It records a year of remarkable success— success 
founded upon twenty-eight years of remarkable 

RESULTS TO POLICYHOLDERS 

Over $256,850,000 of Insurance is now held in 
force by 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

Dept. "P. 16" 
Head Office : : WINNIPEG 



Caxiadiaxi Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



10 



Quick Sales and 
Repeat Orders 



IMPERIAL LUBRICANTS pay you big profits. They sell 
quickly because they are known to nearly every farmer in 
the Dominion. And they bring repeat orders because they 
do give such good satisfaction. 

The farm market— with so many machines requiring lubrication 
—is almost unlimited. Farmers rely on your judgment and turn 
to you with confidence when buying lubricants. They know you 
will only supply them with the best to assure satisfaction from 
the implements you sell. 

The Imperial Lubricant line is the most complete on the mar- 
ket. It includes a special grade for every machine used on the 
farm. Farmers who use the right grade rarely have lubrication 
trouble, and are able to keep operating costs down to a mini- 
mum. All this adds to the prestige of the dealer who sells 
Imperial Lubricants. 

Imperial Lubricants are advertised in all leading farm papers 
year in and year out. Tie up to this advertising. Make your 
store "Headquarters for Lubrication." The Imperial Oil sales- 
man will gladly furnish details regarding our profitable dealer 
agreement. 

IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED 

Power"Heat"Light"Lubrication 

BRANCHES IN ALL CITIES 



Lubricants 

FOR ALL FARM PURPOSES 



IMPERIAL POLARINE OIL 
IMPERIAL POLARINE OIL HEAVY 

For gasoline-burning engines — automobiles, 
tractors and trucks. 

IMPERIAL POLARINE "A" 
For motors requiring an unusually heavy oil« 

IMPERIAL POLARINE KEROSENE 

TRACTOR OIL 
IMPERIAL POLARINE KEROSENE 
TRACTOR OIL EXTRA HEAVY 

For kerosene-burning stationary engines 
and tractors. 

IMPERIAL PRAIRIE HARVESTER OIL 
IMPERIAL GRANITE HARVESTER OIL 

For open bearings of separators, binders, etc, 

IMPERIAL CAPITOL CYLINDER OIL 

For steam cylinder lubrication — tractors and 
statioilary engines. 

IMPERIAL GAS ENGINE OIL 

For stationary or portable engines using 
kerosene 'Or gasoline. 

IMPERIAL POLARINE CUP GREASE 
IMPERIAL THRESHER HARD OIL 
For grease cup lubrication— clean, solidified oils. 



The IMPERIAL CHARTS OF 
RECOMMENDATIONS indicate 
exactly what grade of IMPERIAL 
POLARINE will give best results 
from any type of tractor or 
automobile. - Dealers should 
display them prominently. 
Write to 56 Church Street, 
Toronto, for charts. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3 





Tractor Owners Mean Thresher Orders 



Case Kerosene and Steam 
Threshing Outfits 

20 X 28, 9-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
Case 10-18 Kero. Tractor 

22 X 36, 12-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
Case 15-27 Kero. Tractor 

26 X 46, 12-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
Case 15-27 or 22-40 Tractor 

28 X 50, 20-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
Case 22-40 Kerosene or 
40 H. P. Steam Tractor 

32 X 54, 20-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
Case 22-40 Kerosene or 
50 H. P. Steam Tractor 

36 X 58, 20-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
65 H. P. Case Steam Tractor 

40x62, 20-bar Cyl. Thresher and 
80 H. P. Case Steam Tractor 



EVERY farmer in your territory who owns a tractor — 
it jnakes no difference what mdke, type or size — is a 
prospective Case Thresher owner. Did you ever stop 
to look at it that way? 

The seven sizes of Case Steel-built, Galvanized Threshers 
offer Case dealers an unexcelled opportunity to capitalize 
on practically all tractor power that is not already em- 
ployed in threshing operations. 

An idle tractor represents dead capital. Show the tractor 
owners in your locality how to keep their tractor-invested 
capital active, thereby earning for them the greatest pos- 
sible returns on their investments. Bring to their atten- 
tion the fact that you can furnish a thresher of proved 
worth, in the right size to fit any tractor with a belt power 
rating of 16 H. P. or over. 

On the other hand, don't overlook opportunities to sell 
complete Case Threshing Outfits. In almost every farm 

community where grain, beans and peas are grown you will find there 
is need for a Case rig — both thresher and tractor — either to replace 
some worn-out rig, or to increase the available threshing equipment 
of the community for saving the ann-ual crop. 

Make a personal canvass of your territory, if possible, and send us 
the rtemes and addresses of aU tractor owners and other thresher 
prospects so that we can co-operate with you in interesting these 
farmers in Case Machines. 



J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company 

Dept. E216 Racine, Wisconsin 




Factory Branches 

Alta., Calgary — Edmonton 
Saafc., Regina — Saskatoon 
Man., Winnipeg — Brandon 
Ont., Toronto 



Factory Branches 

Alia., Calgary — Edmonton 
Soak., Regina — Saskatoon 
Man., Winnipeg — Brandon 
Ont., Toronto 



4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 




No. 2 CLIMAX 

For Horse or Tractor Use 



Power Lift 

"CLIMAX" Cultivators 

The Most Effective of 
Weed Destroyers 



lARMERS realize that one of the best assurances of maximum crops lies 
in proper soil cultivation. With the "Climax" they can keep their land 
in good tilth and eradicate the vv^eeds that otherw^ise would rob it of 
moisture and nutriment. 

BEST FOR SUMMER FALLOWING 



On summer fallow the "Climax" has no equal. 
Its wide overlap of teeth, backed up by its rugged 
strength and eflRcient design, keeps the land black. 
It is giving splendid service on thousands of farms 
and is very popular. 



The automatic power lift works by a pull of a cord — 
raises and lowers the points as desired. Handy 
adjustments vary the depth of cut. Strong safety 
springs save breakage of teeth. A size to suit every 
requirement. 



WRITE OUR NEAREST BRANCH FOR FULL PARTICULARS 
AND SUPPLIES OF LITERATURE 



Cockshutt Plow Company, Limited 



WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



SAWYER-MASSEY CO. 

Tractors : Threshers : Road Machinery 



WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AiSAWYER-MASSEY DEALER 



It always pays to be associated with a leader. 

The direction of thought among observing dealers to-day is more 
strongly towards the SAWYER-MASSEY Line than ever before. 
SAWYER-MASSEY has proved that only the finest Engineering and 
Materials will stand up under the strain of farm work. 
The SAWYER-MASSEY Line gets its power and durability 
from quality and precise workmanship. 

In selling the SAWYER-MASSEY Line you sell Tractors 
and Threshers that have been classed "CANADA'S PREMIER 
LINE." 



WALLIS 
TRACTORS 



I 



In selling the SAWYER- 
MASSEY Line you gain 
prestige as a man who 
represents the finest of 
its kind. 





Sawyer-Massey Company Limited 



Head Office and Factories: Hamilton, Ont. 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 



Vol. XVII., No. 5 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, MAY, 1921 



SnBSCEiPTioN Price in Canada ( p|J c^.y ^joj" 



The Evolution of Farm Implements in Relation to the 
Development of Saskatchewan Agriculture 



Farm products won the war. Tliirty An Address to the Aericultural 
million -soldiers had t6| be fed. Farm- i, d u n t.^ n/i 
ers were, therefore, the first exempted. "JV rotter. Mgr., Internat 
Implement manufacturers and distribu- 
tors came second. This is an illustra- 

tion of the relative importance attached , • ,qoi i u ^ ■ j.^ 

to the t^o industries by the different ni 1831, actually worked in the 

governments. ■ Let us consider where Jf^^'' ^"'^ ^'^^ """^ ^"^^^ 

Saskatchewan history plays an impor- 
tant part in agricultural development, Between 1831 and 1847 several men 
and what has been acconii)li8hed by the started building reapers in a small 
implement industry to assist that de- "'""^Y' but it is a very significant fact 
velopment. tliat the first two regular reaper fac- 

What a pathetic picture it woiuld be tories were built in Canada and the 
to-day to see a Saskatchewan farmer United States tihe same year— 1847— 
start down a mile stretch of No. 1 tl>e McCormick factory in Chicago; the 
wheafwith a cradle, and the hired men Massey factory .in New Castle, On- 
following him with a hand rake. That tario. These' men both sturdy farm- 
could not be possible, as there would ers, w-ere gifted with more than ordi- 
be no mile stretches of wheat. The nary foresight and ingenuity. Closely 
self binder has made that possible, ami following the development of Massey 
so common that it creates no com- machines, the Harris madhines were 
ment, though in fact it is really marvel- built in Canada, and about 1850 Marsh 
lous. Brothers, Illinois, had a reaper in use 

The history "of wlieat raising covers at that time which had to be followed 
the past fifty centuries. During the by men, binding the grain. They 
first forty-nine centuries the industry conceived the idea that if a platform 
was practically dormant. The devel- was built on the machine, men could 
opment in wheat raising is confined spend their entire time binding ami 
principally to the last century, and tHio save the time walking between bundles, 
greater part of it to the latter half of Tliey sold the idea to a man by name 
that. ■' of Gammon, who was a Methodist 

History does not show the origin of preacher wiith a weak throat. ;ind who 
wheat, but whatever it was, finally do- turned his attention to manufacturing, 
mestioated, it has become the staple The latter was handicapped for capital, 
food of the world. During the first and about that timei WilliiDi iJeering, 
forty-nin« centuries ofi its existence it who was a hairt fisted lui-incHS ni.in in 
required ninety-seven per cent of the the dry goods business, ciuuo in to 
people of the world to be engaged in Gammon's office and wanted to invest 
agriculture to raise wheat enough to $40,000 in real estate. Gammon, with 
feed themselves and the other three his remaining throat qualities, per- 
per cent. A man who could then af- suaded Mr. Deering to invest his money 
ford bread could afford anything. The in the reaper business. A year passed 
reaper has done more to produce cheap and the business showed profits. After 
bread and create food than any other that the battle opened between Mc- 
implement. Cormick, Massey, Deering, Harris, and 

The Coming of the Reaper many others, and with all these people 

The first successful reaper known building reapers it made possible the 
was built in a little blacksmith shop rapid ex.pansion of the West and all of 

the wheat growing of the 
West and all of the 
world. 

It was not until 1851 
that the sale of reapers 
amounted to anything, 
and up to that time 
wheat raising on this 
continent was confined 
principally to the Cen- 
tral and Eastern States 
and Eastern Canada. 

Raising more wheat 
created other necessities, 
one being the threshing 
machine, which, up to 
that point, had been as 
crude as the early meth- 
ods of harvesting, thresh- 
ing still being done in 
many places with flails, 
or having the grain 
tramped out by cattle or 
men. With the advent 
of the threshers came the 
self binder, which was 
originally a wire binder. 

Original Anvil Block Used by McCormick This prevented the straw 

being used as food for 
stock. Then followed the 

in Virginia where a large stone was development of the twine binder, of 
used for an anvil. It was naturally a which Appleby was the original inventor, 
very crude looking object, and ifc| was and whose knotter is still in use in 
not until ten years later that there was somewhat simplified form. Farming 
any sale for reapers. This reaper, operations were expanding all over the 



Conference, University of Sask., 
ional Harvester Co., Saskatoon 




world, making necessary more advanced 
steps in the evolution of farm imple- 
ments. 

William Deering was the pioneer of 
the twine binder. - He took over the 
Apjileby knotter, and staked everything 
he had in the world on tliis machine 
and in th;s received the ridicule of all 
his competitors, but with 
that tenacity of purpose 
that has always char- 
acterized leaders of the 
industrial world the 
taunts of his competitors 
made no diff'erence. 

The development of 
the twine binder made 
necessary extensive ex- 
periments with different 
fibres, and after many 
heavy 'expenditures and 
years of experiments, 
practically all other 
fibres have been dis- 
carded, except sisal and 
manila fibres, each work- 
ing satisfactorily separ- 
ately or mixed. 

What a Harvest Can Buy 

One harvest in the U.S. and Canada 
would, before the war, have boug'ht the 
kingdom of Belgium, king and all; two 
would buy Italy; three would buy 
Austria-Hungary; and five, at a spot 
cash price, wotild have bought Russia 
from the Czar. How it womld amaze 
Christopher Columbus to-day if he 
knew that the total revenue of Spain 
and Portugal is not equal to the earn- 
ings of the hens oil the continent he 
discovered. 

As Regards Saskatchewan 

In 1870 the Harris company opened 
the first distributing house in Winni- 
peg. Machines could then be freight- 
ed as far West as what is now Qu'Ap- 
pelle, on the C.P.R., and the next year 
machines were freighted overland to 
Prince Albert, over 300 miles. In 
1S84 the first Canadian made binder, a 
Harris machine, was used near Edmon- 
ton. This is the first binder of which 
we have record, working! West of the 
Great Lakes. Soon after this several 
other implement wholesale and distribu- 
ting houses were opened west of Win- 
nipeg. In that year one was opened 
in Regina. In the year 1898 approxi- 
mately 100 binders were sold in what 
is now the Province of Saskatchewan, 
and approximately 30 of those were 
sold in the northern half of the prov- 
ince. That was only 23 years ago, at 
which time the .population of Saskatoon 
was less than 50 people. 

Rapid railroad development brought 
some people nearer markets, and with 
the necessary machinery available crop 
acreages doubled and redoubled, until in 
1920 approximately 10,00>0 binders were 
sold in Saskatchewan, and 4.500 were 
sold in the northern half of the present 
cultivated portion. Trade on all kinds 
of implements increased accordingly. 
The output of breaking plows, moAvers, 
rakes and wagons was enormous, but 
not greater than the acreage of land 



put under cultivation by the courage- 
ous pioneers who came from everywhere 
to make homes, and in very numerous 
instances fortunes in the province. 
Production Was Increased 
Implement manufacturers, seeing fJie 
ever increasing demand for their prod- 
ucts, were forced to greatly increase 
their factories, and also to establish 
new and extensive experimental depart- 
ments, as it was soon discovered that 
plows, drills, and many other imple- 
ments that worked satisfactorily in 




R. H. Potter, Saskatoon Branch, I.H.C. 



other soils, would not work as well in 
Western Canada. 

Even binders, after fifty years of 
most careful manufacture, are not fin- 
ished. Farmers are continually seeking 
for certain added improvements, which 
sometimes take years to perfect. A 
suggested improvement is worked out 
during the winter in the factory, then 
the madiine is probably sent to Texas, 
to wori-c through the harvest in Texas, 
Kansas, Illinois. Dakota and Saskat- 
cliewan, until all the weaknesses are 
eliminated before the machine, with 
this added improvement, is considered 
ready for the market. 

Often an improvement " in itself is 
simple, but to build it into a machine 
without interfering with other working 
parts that time has proven to be jaist 
right, is a very difficult task. It re- 
quires a large force of inventive genius, 
wofl-king continually from harvest to 
harvest, figuring out and figuring into 
the machines the things which the 
users suggest would make machines 
more efficient and economical.i 

The rapid opening of these oceans of 
piairies created a demand for something 
tliat would plow faster. The old faith- 
ful ox met his Waterloo. Even the 
noble horse was found to be short of 
the powe'r required. Some farmers who 
had steam tractors, designed for thresh- 
ing only, hitched several horse gangs 
behind them, and in that way started 
the demand for redesigned steam trac- 
tors, and soon redesigned gas tractors. 
Tractor Development 

Tractors that were marketed ten 
years ago would not be serviceable at 
all to-day, but they played their part 
in the big scheme of development. Back 
in tlie years 1910, 1911 and 1912, tract- 
or plowing demonstrations were held in 
Winnipeg. We have to thank those 
demonstrations, and chiefly the judges, 
for assisting tlie maiuifacturers to elim- 
inate many of the weaknesses and im- 
perfections of tractors and caused them 



G 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



to be put baick through another year or 
two of experimental work before they 
were considered ready for the market. 

The large farmer with several sections 
of land searched the country for a large 
tractor. Few could find them large 
enough. Fi-om the large farmer the de- 
mand spread to the smaller farmer and 
to the homesteader. No one can blame 
them for wanting to keep pace with 
their big neighbor, who could afford to 
hire an experienced operator. Imagine 
a 50 or 60 h.p. tractor, manned by an 
experienced operator, coming down one 
side of the road allowance and you com- 
ing down the other side with oxen pull- 
ing one plow, and plowing one acre to 
the other ifellow's fifteen or twenty. 
Wouldn't you begin to measure the 
efficiency of your equipment and his ? Or 
even if you had horses, and your horses' 
ability to work eight or ten hours, and 
his twelve to eighteen. No one could 
blame the average man for wanting a 
big tractor, when he could see the 
springtime slipping past and only a 
small part of his farm ready for crop. 

The Days of Long Credit 

Then started the reckless and extrav- 
agant extension of credit. That was 
the ijalesman's psychological opportu- 
nity. It took very little argument to 
help these men to decide that they 
wanted a tractor, but the styles then 
available were not as suitable ifor their 
needs as they are to-day. Credit? Yes, 
absolutely necessary to develop a new 
country. Without credit we would not 
be here. It was, and is, the pioneer's 
greatest asset. The homesteader, with 
a yoke of oxen, breaking plow, a tent 
and a few months' grubstake, pair of 
cowhide boots and overalls, was really 
worthy of credit to several times his 
actual worth, because those men came 
here to build homes for themselves and 
families, and not to swindle anyone, and 
in many cases they paid nothing on 
their implements for two or three years, 
working their way through as best they 
could, and often nothing was paid until 
they secured the patent to their home- 
stead. It is remarkable how many of 
these men actually made good. Many 
bought tractors before they should. It 
is estimated that less than 15 per cent 
actually failed in their undertaking 
without tractors, and not to exceed 25 
per cent of those who bought tractors 
actually failed as a result, which ia a 
small average for any pioneer country 
with any kind of equipment. 

Credit Extension Helped 
We were checked up on our credit 
extension by the Saskatchewan govern- 
ment, and, after an extensive investiga- 
tion, we were found guilty of over- 
extension of credit rather than of rigid 
and oppressive collection methods, but 
the soundness of the credit policy is 
emphatically declared by the following 
results : 

"Fifteen years ago only 25. per cent 
of the implements purchased were on a 
cash basis, and in the year 1920, 75 per 
cent of the purchases were for cash. 
Sixty-five per cent of the notes taken 
matured during the current year. It is 
well known that the greater percentage 
of notes taken last year were not paid, 
but we have no fear as to the final out- 
come." 

This, we believe, speaks volumes for 
the opportunities offered from a credit 
standpoint and for the aggressiveness 
and determination of the early settlers 
to enable those miraculous developments 
to take place. 

Repair Service Invaluable 

Another very important service the 
implement companies are able to offer 
is that of repair service. Good repair 
service has had a great deal to, do to- 
ward adding to the efficiency and econ- 
omy of implements. No matter how 
■ well made or how well tested machines 
are, they will wear out and break down, 
and in answer to a telephone call, to 
send the repair and a service man if 
necessary, on the first train, is one of 
the most common features in this 
business. 

AH of these things have made possible 
the most rapid development that his- 
tory records: that of Saskatchewan. 



Grain Production Came West 

In 18170 the census showed that On- 
tario was producing 85 per cent of the 
wheat, oats and barley; Quebec 12 per 
cent and Maritime Provinces 21/2 per 
cent, leaving only per cent for the 
whole of Western Canada. In 1880 
Manitoba came in with 3 per cent. In 
1890 Ontario produced 50 5-10 per cent 
of the three grains, Manitoba 38 per 
cent and the North-west was on the 
board with 4 per cent. In the following 
decade Ontario held its own; Manitoba 
reduced slightly, but the North-west had 
advanced to 8 per cent. In 1910 grain 
production had gone largely to the 
West; Ontario then had but 15 per cent, 
Manitoba had fallen to 25 per cent and 
Saskatchewaji having risen to 51 per 
icent, and that year Alberta appeared 
for the first time in the census grain 
figures, showing 7 per cent of the yield. 
In 1917 Saskatchewan produced 56 per 
cent of the Dominion's wheat, barley 
and oats ; Alberta 20 per cent, Manitoba 
16 5-10 per cent, and Ontario only 5 per 
cent, with Ontario producing more 
bushels of grain than in 1870. Surely 
Western Canada, and especially Sas- 
katchewan, is rightly called "The Bread 
Basket of the World" — with the total 
population of Canada less than that of 
the cities of New York, Chicago and 
Philadelphia. 

What Canada Raises 

Canada has half of 1% of the popula- 
tion of the world. 

Canada raises 18% of its oats. 

Canada raises 15% of its potatoes. 

Canada raises 111/2% of its wheat. 

Canada raises 11% of its barley. 

Based on world's population, Canada 
raises more than the average. 

36 times as many oats per Ksapita. 

30 times as many potatoes per capita. 

23 times as much wheat per capita. 

22 times as much barley per capita. 

Canada possibly raises more per capita 
than any country in the world, and with 
Saskatchewan raising 56 per cent of the 
total wheat of the Dominion, is it any 
wonder we are proud of the start Sas- 
katchewan farmers have made? 
What Development Brought Us 

Agricultural development and agricul- 
tural implement development have gone 
hand in hand from the very beginning. 
This has brought us railroads, then 
schools, churches, colleges, universities, 
rural telephones, rural mail deliveries, 
numerous towns and cities, markets, 
etc., and numerous community interests 
following in the wake of progressive 
agriculture. We can incorporate very 
profitably in our schools the importance 
and dignity of intelligent agriculture, 
and its marvellous possibilities. We 
can turn the minds of the children to- 
ward the farm rather than toward the 
city, and create a love for growing 
things — plants, grains, animals, etc., 
which are nature's own repository for 
health, wealth a,nA happiness, and finally 
teach them to i)uild up a reserve in the 
farming business from the results of 
the good years to help them over the 
lean years. 

The farmer has made practically a 
flying start from the use of the hoe and 
spade to the modern plow and tractors; 
has jumped from the ox-cart to the 
motor -!car, and in many places is now 
living in modern homes, surrounded by 
every convenience, the greater part of 
which is a direct result of harvesting 
made easy. 

In this province we have many who 
have won numerous world's prizes for 
wheat, proving that we have rich soil, 
and plenty of it, still calling for the 
plow. We have the sturdy pioneers who 
have demonstrated what can be done 
and who are the direct cause of these 
things being here. There is room for 
millions more people, and it is going to 
strain the powers of the implement 
industries to keep pace with the devel- 
opment that is sure to follow. 

What of the future? Neither farmers 
nor implement men have finished their 
work. When the active men of today 
have retired from the race, having 
earned a few years of ease and a wealth 
of experience, their places will be filled 
by a new generation of farmers and 



implement men who will carry on the 
work. 

Soil conditions will be studied more 
icarefully; tree planting will be as 
general as potato planting; corn and 
strawberries will be as generally raised 
as oats and cabbage; tame hay will 
replace prairie wool; the farmer's wife 
will start her electric washer in. the 
basement, electric range in the kitchen, 
then go upstairs and make the bed — no 
machine having yet been invented to do 
that work. 

This is certainly an age of experi- 
ments, developments, and specialists. 
The farmer will continue to experiment 
with his soil and develop its productivity. 
The implement manufacturer will con- 
tinue to experiment with and develop 
machinery in an effort to keep pace with 
the farmer. The agricultural and im- 
plement industries are, in fact, partners 
in the enormous business of world 
development. 



Lining up the Local Demand 
for Repairs 

Once again we have that season 
of the year with us in which the 
old subject of machinery repairs 
crops up, and the best way of 
deaHng with it. We all know 
that the average farmer does not 
bother about his machinery until 
the time comes around for him 
to use it; and looking it over 
two or three days before putting 
it into action he finds a part 
missing or broken. He immedi- 
ately, sends to town for the part, 
expecting the implement dealer 
to have the same on hand and 
will very likely raise quite a bit 
of dust if it is not so. The dealer 
will, in turn, expect prompt de- 
livery of 'the repair from the job- 
ber or distributor of the line, for- 
getting that his order is only one 
in hundreds that have been sent 
in at the last minute under similar 
circumstances. 

Needless to say, the distrib- 
uting house gets so badly tied 
up that it will be days before 
they can fill all orders. A ma- 
chine falling down in the field 
is quite a different matter, how- 
ever, as this cannot be foretold, 
but when we think of the thou- 
sands of cases in which, repairs 
might have been ordered, received 
and adjusted long before the time 
came for 'the operation of the 
machine, we can't help but think 
that the supply system could be 
very much improved upon. 

Something might be said in the 
case of the farmer. Suppose he 
knows that there is a part of his 
threshing machine to be replaced 
before he can use it in the thresh- 
ing season. He does no't say any- 
thing to the dealer about it but 
puts the matter ofif — hesitates 
about going to the expense of 
repairing the thresher. This case 
is quite common, but more com- 
mon than this is 'the case of the 
farmer who knows that repairs 
are necessary on plows, drills, 
seeders, etc., implements which 
are bo.und to be called into ser- 
vice each year, and who keeps 



putting off the order day after 
day until he has to get them in 
the field. 

It is up to the dealer to do 
all in his power 'to remedy this 
state of affairs. Get to work 
ahead of the season by advertis- 
ing in the local paper; telephone 
each one of your customers when 
possible, or have a circular letter 
printed and distributed so that 
the farmers will haye the fact 
brought home to 'them that for 
their good they should check up 
their machinery and send in a list 
of the repairs they will require. 

The dealer could then forward 
this list of repair requirements 
for his district to his distributing 
house in the way of a standing 
order. This will give the local 
distribu'tor time to stock up in 
these repairs if necessary, and 
have them ready for shipping the 
moment the dealer requires them. 
In this way a great number of 
the trials and tribulations of re- 
pair work may be passed over 
quite serenely. It is the same 
way with haying and harvesting 
machinery. The dealer should 
get after customers in 'the early 
spring months, find out what 
they are going to require in the 
way of repairs. 

In repair delay an ounce of 
prevention is worth a ton of cure. 
Foresight is necessary on the 
part of the farmer, and the dealer 
should keep after him 'to make 
him exercise that faculty. Last 
minute rush orders mean delay. 
This is not the dealer's faul't, but 
he can remedy the situation by 
keeping the importance of early 
repair orders before his custom- 
ers. Co-operation in repair busi- 
ness is essential — co-operation be- 
tween farmer, dealer and dis- 
tributor. 

Business conditions make it 
evident that 1921 will be sl year 
when the trade will have a heavy 
demand for repairs. Facilitate 
delivery wherever possible by 
going after this business. The 
prestige of giving good repair 
service is no small factor in con- 
nection with a retail implement 
store. 



U.S. Steef Prices are Lower 



The United States Steel Cor- 
poration announces a reduction in 
prices on steel bars, billets, slabs, 
plates, wire rod and other prod- 
ucts. The reductions vary from 
$1.50 to $9 per ton. Steel bars, 
used laiigely in the manufacture 
of farm equipment, have been 
quoted at $2.35 per 100 pounds. 
The new price is $2.10, a reduc- 
tion of about lOy^ per cent. How- 
ever, steel bars have been quoted 
during the past month by inde- 
pendents as low as $2. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 





A Message to the Small-Town Dealer 




The town of Perth, North Da- 
kota, has so few inhabitants that 
map makers usually overlook it 
entirely. 

Yet in a place so small as this 
there are big opportunities for the 
man who represents the Advance- 
Rumely line. 

A. C. Currie, a Perth man who 
knows good machinery when he 
sees it, decided a few years ago 
that a product which possessed the 
OilPull tractor standard of quality 
and economy could be successfully 
sold even in so tiny a place. 

He secured the Ad vance-Rumely 
contract in 1910. Last year he did 
a $100,000 volume business. 

Possibly you have often thought 
your community was too small to 
develop a highly profitable tractor 
business. Let the story of Currie 
of Perth set you straight. 

Rumely OilPull quality is quickly 
recognized wherever it is seen. In- 
troduce it into your community this 
year and within a few seasons its 



splendid field performance will 
make it the most sought tractor in 
your town. We can cite hundreds 
of instances of this kind. 

Rugged strength, great reserve 
power, unequaled endurance, and 
a degree of economy that no other 
tractor has ever attained quickly 
establish the OilPull as the best 
tractor "buy"— bar none. Its better 
value is easily apparent— its many, 
strong features help it to sell itself. 

And the great virtue of the 
OilPull, from the dealer's position, 
is that not only is its introduction 
certain to be followed by a heavy 
demand, but that its staunch, de- 
pendable construction is an assur- 
ance of little need for service. An 
OilPull owner is a lifetime OilPull 
friend. 

Think of Currie of Perth— and 
the opportunity that may be lying 
in your locality to be realized only 
by an Advance-Rumley contract. 
Mail this advertisement with your 
name and address — complete partic- 
ulars will be sent you immediately. 



ADVANCE-RUMLEY THRESHER COMPANY, Inc., LaPorte, Ind. 



Calgary, Alta.- 
Saskatoon, Sask. 



48 Abell Street, Toronto, Ont. 



Regina, Sask. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



ADVANCE-RUMELV 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



The Importance of Correct 
Speed for Cream Separators 



Butterfat is worth more as food 
for human beings than for hogs 
or calves. Yet to-day inany 
farmers are feeding it to these 
animals along with the skimmed 
milk. Do they know it? In many 
cases they do not. The dealer 
can, however, show the farmer in 
dollars and cents that he is los- 
ing money. How? 

One of the most important 
ways in which loss can be traced 
is to watch the speed of the cream 
separator. Is it uniform? Is the 



WeedCrops 



The MaclacWan Disc Harrow 
WIDE-SPREAD COUPLER 

(Patent Pending) 
Makes a 15-ft. wide outfit o£ a 
7-ft. and ap 8-ft. disc harrow — a 
16-ft. wide outfit of two 8-ft. disc 
harrows — an 18-ft. wide outfit of a 
10 and an 8-ft. disc harrow; either 
horse or tractor drawn. It enables 
the farmer to do double the work 
every day with the same man. Its 
flexibility is one of its big features. 
Send for agency offer. 
Magnet Metal & Foundry Co. Ltd. 



Elmwood 




machine always turned at the 
same speed as recommended by 
the manufacturer. 

Too many men guess at the 
right speed and they seldom guess 
right. It is a good rule never to 
guess at anything when it is pos- 
sible to know. Any dealer by 
investigation, can find variations 
all the way from 25 to 75 revol- 
utions per minute in the opera- 
tion of machines driven by guess. 
At neither of these extremes 
would the operator believe he 
was wrong, until he has been 
made to count the number of 
revolutions by a watch. 

The common error in turning 
the separator is too low a speed. 
This means a loss of butterfa't, 
varying- from 1 to 2 per cent to 
as high as 30 'to 40 per cent. It 
is practically impossible to oper- 
ate a cream separator at the cor- 
rect speed by hand day after day. 
It can be done more nearly accur- 
ately than ordinarily if the oper- 
ator will time himself frequently 
or use a speed indicator. But 
even the speed cannot be kept 
nearly as uniform as is the case 
if 'the separator is driven by a 
gas engine or an electric motor. 

The speed at which- the crank 
is turned depends largely upon 
the mental and physical condition 
of the operator. If he comes in 
tired at night he is almost certain 
to turn the crank slower than in 




the morning when fresh and 
energetic. 

Again, where different people 
are operating a sepai^ator, no two 
of them will turn it alike. It is, 
therefore, impossible to get uni- 
formity of speed unless each one 
ma'kes a special effort to turn it 
at the correct speed, which will 
require frequent counting or the 
use of a speed indicator. Even 
then this method is not reliable. 
One of the best ways of getting 
the correct speed at all times is 
with a gas engine. 

Several of the agricultural ex- 
periment stations have carried on 
tests to show the enormous losses 
to farmers of not having their 
cream separators speeded cor- 
rectly. 

The speed of the revolving 
bowl produces the force (centri- 
fugal force), which expels the 
skimmed milk from the bowl. 
The greater the speed, the greater 
the centrifugal force ; and the 
more rapidly will the skimmed 
milk leave the bowl. An increase 
in the speed, therefore, increases 
the capacity of the skimmed milk 
outlet. This means less milk for 
the cream outlet and, conse- 
quently, richer cream. A de- 
crease in the speed lessens the 
capacity of the skimmed milk 
outlet, and more milk has to be 
discharged through the cream 
outlet. The cream, therefore, is 
thinner. 

In one series of tests, a separ- 
ator was so adjusted that, when 
operated at a normal speed of 55 
to 60 turns of the crank per 
minute, it delivered 90 pounds of 
skimmed milk and 10 pounds of 
cream. When the speed was de- 
creased to 25 turns of the crank 
per minute, the separator deliv- 
ered 81 pounds of skimmed milk 
and 19 pounds of cream. The 
speed was ■ 'then raised to 75 
revolutions per minute and the 
separator gave 93 pounds of 
skimmed milk and only 7 pounds 
of cream. 



PUMPS 

AND 

Clothes Reels 

Made in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle pumps for 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys-^^^ 
tems. 

SUCCESSOBS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(Kstablisbed 1882) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS- PRICES 




North-WestPump Co. 

T. N. WILLIAMSON W. J. MERBELL 
Phone 607 

19-6th Street Brandon, Man. 



The effects of these variations 
in speed on the richness of the 
cream was marked. The results 
show that with the separator 
turned at high speed it gives rich 
cream, and that low speed oper- 
ation gives 'thin cream. The 
normal speed tested 44 per cent 
fat, at low speed 11 per cent fat, 
and at high speed 63 per cent fat. 
The low test of cream from the 
low speed separator is due in part 
to a large amount of fat (about 
one-half of the fa't of the milk) 
being- lost in the skimmed milk. 

The speed at which the separ- 
ator runs also affects the amount 
of cream produced— the lower the 
speed the more cream. This in- 
crease in the amount of cream, 
however, is more than offset by 
the reduction in its richness and 
fails to fully make up for the low 
test. The total amount of butter- 
fat in the cream, therefore, is 
much less in the case of low speed 
separation than where the separ- 
ator is run at the proper speed. 

One experiment station ob- 
tained data which shows the pos- 
sible yearly loss of butterfat in 
the skimmed milk from one cow, 
where the separator is incorrectly 
speeded. This data is as follows: 

Pounds 
Loet in 

Separator Run Butterfat 

Ten turns too high 2.21 

N"ormal speed 2.21 

Ten turns too slow 9.18 

Twenty turns too slow 16.06 

These figures show^ that the 
higher speed does not increase the 
loss of iDutterfat nearly as much 
as the loAver speed. Calculate the 
money loss of 'the butterfat by 
figuring at present prices, and it 
is evident that correct speed is an 
important factor in the operation 
of the cream separator. 



Horsfield, Massey -Harris Mana- 
ger at Yorkton 



The Massey-Harris Company 
announces the appointment of 
W. Horsfield to the position of 
manager of the Yorkton branch, 
made vacant by the recent death 
of Mr. Macpherson. This ap- 
pointment is exceptionally popu- 
lar in Yorkton and district where 
Mr. Horsfield has won the good- 
will and esteem of all with whom 
he has been associated. 

Mr. Horsfield entered the em- 
ploy of the Massey-Harris Co. 
at Winnipeg in 1907 and has held 
the position of office manager of 
the Yorkton branch . since 1913. 
The wide experience gained in 
this capacity under the late Mr. 
Henning and Mr. J. A. Graham 
well fit him for 'the position he 
has been selected to fill, and that 
he will make a success of it is a 
foreo'one conclusion. He enters 
upon his new duties wi'th the 
assurance of the utmost support 
and co-operation of the staff. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



9 




Double Sales Possibilities 

The De Laval Separator 
The De Laval Milker 



The De Laval Separator has been a 
great money maker for agents who have 
sold it. The leader in its field, a wide 
demand, universal satisfaction in use, backed 
by the most aggressive sales effort, the 
most consistent advertising, and the last 
word in service, have made the position 
of the De Laval Separator in a sales way 
impregnable. It is the "back-bone" and 
the "bread and butter" of many a mer- 
chant's line. 



Now the De Laval Milker offers just 
as great possibilities as the De Laval 
Separator. It is just as superior to all 
other milkers as the De Laval Separator 
is to all other separators. Wherever it 
is in use owners have nothing but praise 
for it. It is a better way of milking and 
no dairyman can afford to be without it. 

Get in touch with us if we are not ade- 
quately represented in your community. 



THE DE LAVAL COMPANY, Ltd. 

MONTREAL PETERBORO WINNIPEG EDMONTON VANCOUVER 



Sooner or later you will sell ihe 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



10 Canadian Farm Implements May, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



The Polar Liquid Company, 
Ltd., Winnipeg, has changed its 
name to Robinson & Webber, 
Ltd. 

The Ruggles Motor Truck Co., 
London, Ont., is planning to erect 
another large addition to its 
plant. 

The SKF Ball Bearing Co., 
Hartford, Conn., has changed the 
company name to Skayef Ball 
Bearing Co. 

In addition to the American 
and Canadian machines, two 
European 'tractors will be offered 
in Canada this year. 

The Hilts Stocking Machine 
Company will erect a factory 
at Medicine Hat for the manu- 
facture of stooking machines and 
stook loaders. 

The Monarch Industries, Ltd., 
has been incorporated at Beams- 
ville, Ont., with a capital of 
$30,000 to manvtfacture registers, 
carburetors, motors, etc. 



The Dodge Mo'tor Co. an- 
nounced recently the appointment 
of L. H, Stanton as field repre- 
sentative, his territory to extend 
from Fort William to the coast. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, 
report a decrease of 4L64 per cent 
in sales for the first quarter of 
the current year, as compared 
with the corresponding period of 
1920. » 

Appliances, Ltd., 208 King St. 
West, Toronto, have been ap- 
pointed exclusive sales agents for 
the British Empire for the "Col- 
onial Maid" electric clothes-wash- 
ing machine. 

The British Wallis tractor is 
now fitted with a special draw 
bar and mudshiejds. The price 
in England, where the tractor is 
made by Ruston & Houston, 
Lincoln, is $2,475. 

The P. T. Legare Co., Ltd., 
Montreal' has increased its capi- 
talization and is making an issue 



of $1,200,000 bonds for extending 
its selling operations in agricul- 
tural implements. 

The Coffield Washer Co., Ham- 
ilton, will, it is said, manufacture 
a new t3'^pe of electric washing 
machine. It is supported by local 
capital and will commence oper- 
ations in a few weeks. 

The Samson Tractor Co., of 
Canada, recently held a conven- 
tion for their Ontario dealers at 
Oshawa. A number of executives 
from the American plant at Janes- 
ville. Wis., were present. 

Robert R. Keith, formerly with 
the Moline Plow Co. in charge 
of the tractor worlks, has been 
made superintendent of tractor 
Avorks of the International Har- 
vester Co., at Chicago. 

Hart-Parr (England) Co., Pet- 
erborough, England, has been 
formed by F. Smith & H. Stover 
to take over the entire selling 
righ't for the British Isles of Hart- 
Parr tractors .and Hoover potato 
diggers. 

The Lyman Tube and Supply 
Co., Montreal, have been ap- 
pointed Canadian distributors for 
the -"Hoffman" ball and roller 
bearings, manufactured by the 
Hoffrrian Mfg. Co., of Chelmsford, 
Essex, England. 

The Gray Motor Corporation, 
Detroit, recently incorporated 
with a capital of $4,000,000, has 
as its officers: President, F. L. 
Klingensmith ; vice-president, F. 
F. Beall ; treasurer, G. H. Kirch- 
ner; secretary, J. B. Moran. 

A provincial charter has been 
issued to the McQuay-Norris- 
Banfield Company, Limited, with 
an authorized capital of $50,000. 
The company will manufacture 
the McQuay-Norris piston ring. 
The head office will be at Tor- 
onto. 

An involuntary petition in 
bankruptcy has been filed against 
the Monarch Tractor Co., Water- 
tOAvn, Wis. This company is a 
part of the General Tractors, Inc., 
against which bankruptcy pro- 
ceedings were filed some 'time 
ago. 

J. E. Tracy, for the past four 
years general sales manager of 
the Sterling Motor Truck Co., 
Milwaukee, has joined the Hicks- 
Parrett Tractor Co., Chicago 
Heights,^IlI., in the capacity of 
vice-president and director of 
sales. 

The General Truck & Auto 
Sales, Ltd., has been incorporated 
at Walkerville, Ont., with a capi- 
tal stock of $200,000 by H, E. 
Blood, C. D. Donoven and W. J. 
Davidson, to manufacture auto- 
mobiles, motor trucks and farm 
implements. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co., 
formerly the Duluth Corrugating 



& Roofing Co., announces that 
the company's name has been 
changed to the Western Steel 
Products Co. Address, as before, 
-is Duluth, Minn. There is no 
change of officers or management. 

R. S. McLaughlin, of Oshawa, 
head of the General Mo'tors in 
Canada, sailed recently from New 
York for Europe, and expects to 
be absent for about six weeks. 
He will visit England, France and 
Switzerland, and will investigate 
export trade conditions overseas, 
with a view to stimulating busi- 
ness at home. 

The Eternal Battery Company 
of Canada, Limited, is one of 
Winnipeg's newer industries, cap- 
italized at $1,000,000, to manu- 
facture storage batteries for auto- 
mobiles, electric vehicles, motor- 
boats and other purposes for 
which storage batteries can be 
conveniently used. 

Many changes, with evidences 
of expansion, are shown in the 
balance sheet of the Goodyear 
Tire & Rubber Co. of Canada, 
Ltd., for the year ended Septem- 
ber 30th last. The total assets 
are shown as $19,100,754 as com- 
pared with $10,891,390 for the 
year ended September 30th, 1919. 
The surplus is $1,071,275. 

A special general meeting of 
the shareholders of the Canadian 
General Electric Company, Ltd., 
is called for June 15. The pur- 
pose of the meeting is to secure 
'the approval of shareholders to 
increasing the capital stock of the 
company to $20,000,000, this be- 
ing an addition of $8,000,000 to 
the present capital stock. 

The English Electric Company 
has announced its intention of 
extending operations to Canada, 
and will, it is understood, erect 
factories in Toronto for the marr- 
ufacture of electrical machinery 
and equipment. The company 
is said to be the largest firm of 
its kind in the British Empire. 



Implement Production Census 
in U.S. 



The U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture are asking manufacturers 
of farm operating equipment in 
that country to give a report on 
their production for 1920. Every 
class of manufacturer will be 
reached, from tra'ctor and 
thresher factories down to fac- 
tories turning out the smaller im- 
plements and tools. The produc- 
tion will be classified according 
to the size and type of machine 
turned out and should form an 
interesting review of the entire 
farm equipment production of 
the country. 

He leads a dog's life— growls 
all day ; snores all night. 



Wl N N I PEG ^^^^ CALGARY 

lAlRITE US, mentioning this publication, for 
catalogues and prices of the famous 
ALL-STEEL RUTH SELF FEEDER, any of the 
six styles of Maytag Washing Machines, Oils, 
Belts, Headlights, and all other Threshers' 
Supplies. (re'l^fc'l^u^N^i^lVL^^S) Do Not Delay. 



Fordson Tractor Fenders 

A FAST SELLING SPECIALTY FOR THE DEALER 




You can sell them to every Fordson owner in your district. Protect 
the driver and gearing. Keep dust from wheels out of driver's face. 
Mafle of heavy, galvanized, corrugated iron, painted black. Strongly 
reinforced. Iron braces, with bolts, nuts and washers, are supplied. 
The braces are bolted to tractor at points where holes are already 
bored. No drilling necessary. They can be attached with no 
trouble. Let us ship you a sample. 

REASONABLE PRICE. ATTRACTIVE TRADE DISCOUNT. 

The Metallic Roofing Co. of Canada Limited 

797 Notre Dame Avenue Manufacturers Winnipeg 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



11 



Every Farmer 

a Prospect 

DEALERS ! Are you awake to the fact 
that EVERY farmer in the West is fast becom- 
ing a prospective customer for a silo that will 
make good sunflower ensilage, and keep it 
sweet and fresh ? 
— in other words, a Toronto Silo. 

Toronto Silos are made of wood. They're 
sturdily built from double-tongued and grooved 
staves of selected spruce impregnated with 
creosote. They give adequate protection 
against air and frost. Their special Hip Roof 
construction provides MORE space for filling. 





Toronto Silos — and Toronto Labor-Saving 
Equipment — are proving money-makers to 
dealers throughout Canada. Let them do the 
same for you. Get our attractive dealer 
proposition at once. 

The "Toronto" line includes engines, 
saws, grinders, fanning mills, pumps, 
well-drilling machinery, tanks, silos, 
ensilage cutters, grain picklers. 

Ontario Wind Engine & Pump 
Co. (Western Branch) , Ltd. 

Winnipeg Regina Calgary 

Eastern Offices: Toronto and Montreal 



ONTARIO WIND ENGINE & PUMP CO. 

LIMITED 



Let this Sign 
Bring YOU 
Business 



If you sell gasoline and oil, you can 
get this attractive, novel, life-sized 
Boy and Slate Sign. 

Other dealers have it now — and every 
one of them is convinced that it 
brings a vast volume of extra business. 

It is made of wood and steel — ^hand- 
somely painted in natural colors; and 
is supplied to En-ar-co Dealers along 
with a series of catchy epigrams so 
that a new "eye-catcher" can be put 
on it every other day throughout the 
year. 




Let us place in your 
hands all the particu- 
lars about the En-ar-co 
Boy and Slate Sign. 
Address Dept. C.F.I. 5, 
Canadian Oil Companies 
nearest branch for this 
information — it will be 
sent free of all cost or 
obligation to all dealers 
in gasoline and oil and 
to garage and service sta- 
tion owners everywhere. 



CANADIAN OIL COMPANIES Limited 

Branches : 

Toronto, London, Montreal, Quebec, St. John, Halifax, Winnipeg, 
Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary 



Here is the Ring for Profit- 

Wilkie One-Piece Piston Rings Have 
Unusual Selling Advantages for Dealers 

'W!ilkie Piston Rings insure the high compression necessary to get all the power out of 
even the lowest test fuels. Worn or leaky rings are the cause of most tractor trouble — the 
compression and explosive power escape past the pistons — the fuel is poorly compressed and 
only part is burned. Carbon fouling quickly develops. Our rings insure full, deep charging 
strokes and perfect compression. All the fuel goes into power. 

In Demand Everywhere — For Cars, Trucks, 
Tractors and Stationary Engines 

Show your customers the money-making advantages of greater power. Show how Wilkie 
Rings will save gas, increase power and reduce oil consumption. Our rings are manufactured 
from single-cast, close-grained, properly proportioned materials. Lap-joint type; perfectly 
round. Produced by the most up-to-date machines, and as near perfect as a piston ring can 
be. Do not distort — they stand the highest heat and pressure. 

Made Right— For a Purpose. Your Stocks Turn Over Fast. Good Profits 

Wilkie Rings sell best because they save most. Made for every size of internal combustion engine. 
Cash in on their sales-making advantages. Get particulars, prices and liberal trade discount. 

For Every Size of Engine Unconditionally Guaranteed 

The ever-increasing demand for "Wilkie" Piston Rings is the most convincing proof that we are making 
rings of tfetter quality. 

WINDSOR MACHINE AND TOOL WORKS 

312-314 Pitt Street West Windsor, Ont. 




Universal Cylinder Re-boring Tools 

The handiest tool the dealer or repair 
man can have. Can be used by 
hand or dxill press. Simple in design. 
Comprises a cutter head with six 
cutters, adjustable in unison. Rebores 
all makes of auto, tractor and station- 
ary engines, either open or closed-end 
cylinders. Get our catalog. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



Tractors Sold in Western Canada in 1920 



Horsepowers Number 



6-12 to 10-20 H.P 5,445 

11-22 to 12-25 H.P 2,054 

14-28 to 16-32 H.P 2,309 

17-34 to 20-40 H.P 324 

22-45 H.P. and over 147 



Total Gas Tractors 10,279 

Steam Tractors, all sizes 89 



Total all Tractors 10,368 



12 



Tractor Sales Possibilities in 
Western Canada 



At the commencement of 1920 
we made the estimate that the 
Western Canadian provinces 
would absorb 10,000 tractors in 
1920. Following- the sale of some 
9,000 itractors in 1919, many be- 
lieved that this figure was too 
high. Actual reports from manu- 
facturers and distributors, how- 
ever, show that in 1920 no less 
than 10,279 gas tractors were sold 



"Perfect" 

is a 
Bold Word 

But nevertheless we use 
it in describing the 

"LONDON" ENGINE 

Perfect in design, work- 
manship, material and 
efficiency — perfect with 
the same degree of ac- 
curacy as the shells 
turned out by our 
mechanics — expert me - 
chanics — during the war 
years. 

RELIABLE DEALERS * 
EVERYWHERE 

The "LONDON" is a fully 
guaranteed engine that will 
bring prestige with its sale. 




a; Qualit)) Wine at 
a Quantity Price. 

Made in 5 Sizes. 
Write for Catalogue 

LONDON 6AS POWER CO. LTD. 

32 York St. London Ont. e 



in the three prairie provinces, 
without taking in,to consideration 
tion orchard size or larger 
machines sold in British Col-' 
umbia. 

These tractors, as shown in the 
tabulated statement, ranged from 
6-12 H.P. to machines of 22-45 
H.P. and over. 

The steadily increasing volume 
of traqtor business in the Can- 
adian West is of direct interest 
to every dealer and distributor. 
The number of tractors sold in 
the last four years is as follows : 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTEDO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for: 

Advance-Rumely Thresfier Co,, 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Ltd.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
Co.; J. I. Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadiaa Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; EmersoQ-Branting- 
ham Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Stalnley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.; 
Minneapolis Threshing Machine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer- Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



In 1917, 5.000 tractors; 1918, 
7,500; 1919, 9,000 and in 1920, 
over 10,000 traqtors. It is esti- 
mated variously that there are 
from 36,000 to 38,000 tractors 
owned by the farmers in Western 
Canada at the present time. Of 
the 10,279 traqtors sold in 1920, 
3,671 were sold in Manitoba, 
4,229 in Saskatchewan and 2,379 
in Alberta. 

As the seasonal sales for 1920 
show, although tractor business 
dropped off to some extent at the 
end of the year, this was more 
thah compensated for by the 
large sales made especially in 
the spring months. To estimate 
the probable volume of sales in 
1921 is difficult, but it is safe to 
say that, owing to the decrease 
in the value of farm products, this 
will not be a record tractor year. 
Fuel is still high in price, while 
reductions in milling and feed 
grains may tend to reduce tractor 
investment t6 some extent. The 
cost of good horses, however, 
shows little reduction. Taking 
all factors into consideraition, 
from 7,000 to 7,500 will probably 
represent the total number of 
sales in 1921, presupposing an im- 
provement in buying conditions 
in late summer and fall. 



BUGGY 
REPAIRS 

We carry Repairs for 

McLaughlin, Canada 

CARRIAGE and TUDHOPE 
BUGGIES and DAVENPORTS, 

and have the only stocks in 
the West. The majority of 
standard parts will fit any 
buggy' 

SEND YOUR REPAIR 

ORDERS TO 

F. N. McDonald & Co. 

166 PRINCESS STREET 
WINNIPEG 



May, 1921 



There is a possibility of good 
business in many districts but 
the business will require real 
sales effort to geit. Selling will 
not be so easy as in past years. 

Average Prices of Tractors 

The average cost of trac/tors 
and plows last year will be of 
interest to the dealer. Tractors 
sold averaged as follows : From 
6-12 to 10-20 H.P., $1,181; from 

11- 22 to 12-25 H.P., $1,822; from 

14- 25 to 16-32 H.P., $2,353 ; from 
17-34 to 20-40 H.P., $3,168; 22-45 
H.P. and over, average price, 
$5,460. The average cosit of 
2-bottom plows was $235 ; 3-bot- 
tom, $295 ; 4-bottom, $395 ; 5-bot- 
tom, $780, and 6-bottom, $910. 
The estimated value of tractors 
in use in 1920 was $21,000,000, 
and of tractor plows, $7,800,000. 
Assuming the volume of business 
anticipated ithis year, and taking 
into account the present prices, 
over eleven million dollars value 
in tractors should be sold during 
the year, and nearly two and one- 
half million dollars value in trac- 
tor plows. 

Analysis of the sizes sold last 
year shows that apparently 53 per 
cent, of ithe purchasers invested 
in 10-20 tractors ; 20 per cent, in 

12- 25 tractors, and 23 per cent, in 

15- 30 or 18-36 H.P. tractors, the 
balance buying larger machines. 

Figures compiled by the "Nor'- 
West Farmer" from reports avail- 
able from their large and repre- 
sentative circulation in Western 
Canada, give some interesting 
data on the average period of 
operation for traqtors in use in ^he 
West. According to farmers re- 
ports sent this leading farm jour- 
nal, the average tractor is used 
109 days in ithe year. This period 
is divided approximately as fol- 
lows : Plowing, 53 days ; thresh- 
ing, 22 days ; Various field opera- 
tions, 25 days ; belt and general 
haulage work, 17 days. 

There are now nearly 40 indi- 
vidual makes of tractor being 
sold in the Canadian West by 
manufacturers' branch houses or 
distributors. That the value of 
this territory more than jusitifies 
the number of firms selling trac- 
tors therein is obvious when one 
considers the agricultural produc- 
tion of the Prairie Provinces. 

In plating an estimated value 
of approximaitely $21,000,000 on 
the tractors in use in 1920, a 
liberal depreciation is allowed for 
each year on machines less than 
four, years old, and a purely 
nominal valuation previous to 
that date. The current net aver- 
age cost price of the machine is 
used as a basis. 

Maintenance and Equipment 

AVhile the number of tractors 
in operation in the Canadian 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



13 



Liberty Grain Blowers 

sell themselves -pay their way 

Elevator and cleaner combined. Moves, cleans and grades 
grain in one operation. Elevates 30 feet. Blows out filth. 
Saves inferior grain for feed. No buckets, chains or gears. 
Simply air blast. Simplest, lightest and least expensive 
elevator made. 

CAPACITY 300 TO 800 BUSHELS PER HOUR 

Only one moving part — a strong steel fan. Driven easily by a 6 H.P. engine. Fills 
the biggest bins or cars without scooping. Takes the place of three men. Apply 
at once for particulars and territory. 




DEALERS: Get 
the Agency for 




LINK TRACTOR 
TENDERS 

They assure the farmer a continu- 
ous, ready supply of kerosene, 
gasoline, oils and water. Safe 
transportation. He simply hitches 
his supply of fuels, oil and water 
behind his tractor, drives to the 
field, unhitches and goes to work. 

THEY FIT ALL MAKES OF 
STEEL BARRELS 



AUTOMATIC TILT. NOT A 
DROP WASTED 

Lever and ratchet lock barrels, 
when tilted, to any angle. No lift- 
ing; one hand does the work. 
Tongue stand holds tender level 
when not in use. Weight complete, 
275 lbs. Our Tractor Tenders are 
the money-maker of the season for 
dealers. Write 




SHOWN READY FOR THE ROAD 



LINK MANUFACTURING CO, 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, MAN. 




Dealers: The Burd Ring Agency 
is a Money-Maker for You 

SELL THEM FOR :— Tractors, 
Automobiles, Stationary Engines, 
Motor Boats, Motor Trucks, 
Motor Cycles. All Engines, 
Pumps and Compressors. 

Dealers who display Burd High- 
Compression Rings sell more power 
to every owner of a motor or engine. 

The LARGEST STOCK OF STANDARD and 
OVER-SIZE RINGS IN WESTERN CANADA 

Individually cast from selected iroa. Not turned; ground-finished to within 
J4 of 1-lOOOth inch of a perfect circle. Burd Rings prevent leakage of 
power, save fuel and ensure economical operation. Equal tension. Make 
a gas-tight contact all around the cylinder walls. No gap. Give more 
power on less fuel and oil. 

Our Quick Seating Step- 
Joint Rings are made in 
all sizes. Note the two- 
thousandth inch groove 
on ring face. Especially 
adapted for worn cylin- 
ders. Burd Rings elimin- 
atfe lost compression, lost 
power, faulty lubrication 
and carbon deposits. Sold 
by Jobbers, Dealers and 
Garages. 

WRITE FOR LISTS AND DEALER'S DISCOUNTS 

BURD RING SALES CO. OF CANADA 

322 McINTYRE BLOCK WINNIPEG 

Distributors for Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia 




PATENT APPLIED FOR 




Popular Demand is Favoring' the 
4-CyIinder Car. With the 

BRISCOE 

YOU Can Most Profitably Meet 
This Demand, 



D 



EALERS are finding an increasing tendency 
among to-day's motor car buyers to 
favor the 4-cylinder car because of its 
greater economy and efficiency. 

If you are seeking the car that offers both 
these features in the highest degree, the New 
Briscoe will command your attention from the 
outset. 

In the feature of economy alone, Briscoe 
merits your deciding preference. Its gasoline 
and tire economy is amazing. 

But note Briscoe's impressive beauty of line 
and finish, and its mechanical features. 

The vast reserve power of Briscoe's famous 
four-cylinder motor accomplishes the most spec- 
tacular hill -climbing. 

An effortless crawl in traffic and almost in- 
stantaneous acceleration, prove its remarkable 
flexibility. 

Perfect brake control is attained by separate 
sets of brakes, "Service" acting on wheels and 
"Emergency" acting on transmission. 

The crank-shaft balanced scientifically on 
three-bearing suspension, ensures minimum 
vibration. 

Over-size semi-elliptic springs front and rear — also 
deep upholstering, guarantees remarkable riding ease. 

Moto-meter, non-glare headlight lenses, and a com- 
plete instrument board are only a few features of its 
equipment. 

All these features combined in a smart appearing 
car of moderate price, give the Briscoe dealer the profit- 
able advantage of representing "The Greatest Value Car 
on the Market." 

Our dealer proposition is unusually interesting. 
If your territory is open—write us. 



THE 

Canadian Briscoe lyiotor Company 

Head Office and Factory: BROCKVILLE, Ont. LIMITED 

UNITED STATES: 
BRISCOE MOTOR CORPORATION, JACKSON, MICH. 

Western Service Department, F. N. McDonald & Co., 156 Princess St., Winnipeg. 

-DISTRIBUTORS FOR WESTERN CANADA: 

Auto Service Co., Ltd., 1500 10th Ave, Regina 
Gillespie-Mansell Motor Co., Ltd., 240 Third Ave. South, Saskatoon 
J. R. N. Cooke & Co., 10319 Jasper Ave., Edmonton 
Diamond Motor Co., Ltd., 225 6th Ave. West, Calgary 
Trimble & Henry, 1033 Georgia St., Vancouver 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



West is, according to area, far 
less than in the United States, we 
have a potential tractor market 
that is second ito none. Beyond 
the sale of new machines, and re- 
placement business, the annual 
maintenance and operation cost 
of the thirty-six to thirty-eight 
thousand traqtors in use in the 
West is enormous. While a 
large percentage of farmers re- 
port as high as one hundred days' 
operation in the year, assuming 
that only, fifty days a year are 
worked, we have, at that low 



estimate, a market for more than 
33,000,000 gallons of gasoline or 
kerosene. In addition there is the 
sale of lubricating oils and 
greases and of 'tractor ignition 
equipment, such as magnetos, 
spark plugs, cable, etc. The parts 
replacement business in itself 
represents a very large business. 
In addition there are possibilities 
for the sale of such lines as oil 
barrels and drums, oil wagon 
tanks, tractor tenders, tractor 
lamps, tractor safety hitches, and 
so on. Where 'tractors are sold 




LONDON GEM CONCRETE MIXER 

This machine is suitable for such work as mixing 
mortar or concrete for floors, barn walls, founda- 
tions, silos or any work not requiring a capacity 
of over 20 yards per day. IT CAN BE RUN BY 
HAND or connected to gasoline engine or any 
kind of power. It is well built and will save the 
price of itself in ten days' use. Described in 
Bulletin A. 

LONDON CONCRETE MACHINERY CO., LTD. 



Agents will find this machine a great 
seller. :: Write for terms to Agents. 



LONDON 



Dept. K- 



CANADA 



the dealer immediately has a 
prospective market for tractor 
implements of all kinds, for trac- 
tor haulage equipment and the 
larger sizes of belt-operated ma- 
chines, such as feed grinders and 
cutters, ensilage cutters, small 
threshers, etc. 

The most assuring feature "in 
connection with the tractor busi- 
ness is the gradual but steady 
withdrawal from the market of 
machines which were not con- 
spicuously successful, or which 
were being sold without adequate 
preparation for permanent busi- 
ness conditions. The farmer is 
sold on the tractor idea. To 
successfully handle the large 
acreages in Western Canada, and 
to ofifset the possibility of a short 
season, the tractor has proven to 
be a boon to agriculture. A great 
market exists in the three hun- 
dred thousand farmers of the 




The "Best Sellers" 

The Separator with the Million Dollar Bowl! 



mi 



HE new Empire- Baltic — "The Separator with the Mil- 
lion Dollar Bowl" — is the most thoroughly modernized, 
simplified, and efficient Cream Separator on the mar- 
ket to-day. 

The advantages afforded by its simple construction, and im- 
proved bowl — spindle disconnected — are easily seen and 
appreciated — and it is these that will make Empire-Baltic 
Separators the best sellers in your district. 

EIGHT SIZES. CAPACITY from 135 to 1,000 Lbs. Per Hour. 



The New Pulsator f ' 

4 'Year Guarantee 

The Empire Milking Machine has so proved 
its efficiency and superiority, that numbers of 
the large dairies have standardized on this 
equipment. 

The new pulsator of the Empire Milking 
Machine is the only pulsator with a four-year 
guarantee. This feature will strongly appeal 
to your prospects and help you make sales. 

You will be interested in' the Empire dealer 
proposition. Write us for particulars. 

ROBINSON -ALAMO LTD. 



140 PRINCESS ST. 

Western Distributors of 




WINNIPEG 








CREAM SEPARATORS AND MILKING MACHINES 



The Empire Cream Separator Co. of Canada^ Ltd. 



TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 



Canadian West, especially for the' 
sale of proven, reliable and effi- 
cient tractors, as sold by estab- 
lished concerns who are in the 
business to stay — concerns who 
have adequate dealer co-operation 
and service facilities throughout 
the vast territory lying between 
the Great Lakes and the Pacific 
Coast in the Dominion. 



A New Catalogue 

The London Concrete Machin- 
ery Co. Ltd., London, Ont., re- 
cently issued their new catalog, 
No. 49, showing in condensed 
form their complete line of con- 
crete working machinery. The 
100 pages of this interesting pub- 
lication are finely illustrated, a 
remarkable variety of equipment 
being shown. Clear cut engrav- 
ings and terse descriptive matter 
make this catalog of more than 
usual interest. Among 'the lines 
shown are : 

Concrete carts, concrete mixers, 
drain tile machines, gasoline and 
kerosene engines, mixers in a 
variety of types and sizes, silo 
and silo moulds, water tanks, 
well and cistern molds, etc. For 
the dealer who has a demand for 
concrete-making machinery, from 
the farmer, small or large con-' 
tractor, or municipality, types of 
machines are shown which should 
suit 'the individual requirements. 
This catalog will be a useful addi- 
tion to the files of Western 
dealers. 



Sawyer-Massey Production 



In 1920 the Sawyer-Massey 
Co., Hamilton, sold over two 
hundred carloads of threshers to 
the United States. For 1921 they 
have a large order for further 
shipment of this Canadian-made 
separator. The company recently 
secured an order from Kingston, 
Jamaica, for between $80,000 and 
$90,000 worth of road rollers, 
rock crushers, portable screens, 
engines, dump wagons, etc. All 
the goods for this export order 
have already been shipped. 



Tractor Executive Visits West 



Langton J. Williams, manager 
of the General Ordnance Co., 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa and New 
York, recently returned south 
after a visit to the Canadian 
West. Mr. Williams anticipates 
good business in Western Can- 
ada this season and has made 
arrangements for the distribution 
of the G-O tractor in Manitoba 
through The Tractioneers, of 
Winnipeg. 



Honest opinion, like homely 
women in street-cars, Sitand long- 
est. 



May, 1921 Canadian Farm Implements 



15 



Piston Rings a Good Side Line 



In almost every iterritory the 
tractor, car and implement dealer 
have a steady demand through- 
out the season for piston rings. 
If a farmer wants new rings for 
his car, truck, tractor, or for his 
stationary engine, the first man 
he thinks of is the farm equip- 
ment dealer. 

Judicious advertising for his 
accessory line is profitable for the 
dealer. In addition a display of 
rings in window space and a g"ood 
rijig show case will rajDidly build 
satisfactory business in this line. 
The dealer should study the func- 
tions of a well-fiitting piston ring 
and should impress upon his cus- 
tomers the value of a truly con- 
centric ring which absolutely 
conforms to the cylinder bore. 
Good rings assure dependable 
power and prevent loss of com- 
pression. They check surplus oil 
seepage to the combustion cham- 
ber and the (trouble of carbonized 
cylinders, pre-ignition and the 
other factors that follow leaky 
piston rings. 

Explain to tractor owners that 
efficiency in operation is a ques- 
tion of power, and that depend- 
able power is the keynote of 
satisfactory tractor service. A 
little consideration of the master 
will convince anyone that the 
best piston rings are none too 
good for the tractor moitor. 
Think of the exacting work 
which a tractor motor must per- 
form during the course of a year. 
On the average farm a tractor is 
subject to variances in loads 
which cause tremendous strain on 
the motor. It is easy to see why 
leaky piston rings means inability 
on the tractor's part to perform 
work, easily wiithin the machine's 
power providing quality rings are 
used. 



International Reduces Price of 
Tractor 



The International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, in addition to 
reductions announced in our last 
issue, now announces a further 
reduction in the price of the Inter- 
national 15-30 h.p. tractor. The 
retail price of this model, fully 
equipped, f.o.b. Winnipeg, is now 
$2,360, showing a reduction of 
$280. 



A New Grain Saving Device 



A. L. Larson & Co., Scobey, 
Mont., have placed a device on 
the market to stop grain waste in 
threshing. This consists of a 
blast regulator, comprising a 
governor on the fanshaft of the 
separator, a blast board with 
moving shutters and a speed in- 
dicator showing the revolutions 



of the fan. The blasit board and 
governor are adaptable to any 
threshing machine. 

The operation of the blast regu- 
lator is as follows: If the engine 
races, the wind governor auto- 
matically shuts the wind board to 
compensate, ithe blast is even, and 
the grain is cleaned without be- 
ing cleaned out. An adjusting 
lever enables the operator to set 
the shutters at the proper angle 
to clean the grain, wheither it is 
light or heavy, and once set the 
governor takes care of the rest. 



Austin Tractor is Improved 



Reports from England show 
that the Austin traotor, as sold by 
the Austin Motor Co., Montreal, 
has been re-designed for increased 
efficiency in heavy soils. At a 
recent demonstration in England 
this tractor pulled three furrows, 
8 inches deep, in heavy clay loam. 
The tracitor has been fitted with 
a new differential stated to have 
double the strength of the former 
model and lower frictional losses. 
The materials used throughout 



in the transmission gears have a 
higher margin of strength, and 
there has been a reduction in 
gearing, increasing' the pull. 



Move, clean and trrade your grain in one job — 
fill big' bins or cara without scooping — 
save time, labor and money with the 

Liberty Grain Blower 

No buckets, chains or Rears. Onl; 
ONE moving part. 6 H. P. runs it, 
One man can move it. Lightest, 

stmplest, best grain handler. Costa 
half aa much as old-style elevator. 
FREE BOOK, fllastrated, explains 
fully. Send name for copy— « card 
will do. 

LINK MFG. CO. Dept. 
Portage la Prairie, Man. 




i nassey - Ha3»is 



Popularity and Sales 
Go Hand in Hand 

rplOR SEVENTY- FOUR YEARS the performance of 
Lf-J Massey-Harris Machines has proved that they 
l^^J are better than good machines, and farmers 
everywhere know that they can depend upon an im- 
plement bearing the name "Massey-Harris." In addi- 
tion the owners of "Massey-Harris" machines know 
that, if a repair part is needed they can*get it easily 
and quickly. 

—Quality and service mean ready sales 
for the agent who handles this line. 

Now is the time to get around after orders for hay 
tools, and it is also well to remember that the Massey- 
Harris line is complete, as shown in the following list : 



GRAIN BINDERS 
REAPERS 

CORN HARVESTERS 

MOWERS 

RAKES 

SIDE DELIVERY RAKES 

TEDDERS 

HAY LOADERS 

CULTIVATORS 

SEEDERS 

HOE DRILLS 

SHOE DRILLS 

DISC DRILLS 

FERTILIZER DRILLS 

FERTILIZER SOWERS 

DISC HARROWS 



DRAG HARROWS 
HARROW CARTS 
FEED CUTTERS 
PULPERS 
GRINDERS 
ENSILAGE CUTTERS 
MANURE SPREADERS 
CREAM SEPARATORS 
PLOWS, SCUFFLERS 
LAND ROLLERS 
PACKERS 
WAGONS 
SLEIGHS 

GASOLINE ENGINES 
SAW OUTFITS 
TRACTORS 



MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

ESTABLISHED 1847 

HEAD OFFICE - TORONTO, ONT. 



16 



Canadian Farm Implements May, 1921 



Procter now with Grain Drill Co. 



R. H. Procter, general sales 
manager for the New Owatonna 
Maiaufacituring Company, Owa- 
tonna, Minn., recently visited 
Western Canada where he will 
establish a distributing conaec- 
fion for the Owatonna line of 
, grain drills and seeders. This 
line is very popular in U.S. terri- 
tory it is stated. 

Mr. Procter, who emigrated 
from England to Canada, farmed 
in jManitoba some 25 years ago. 
He was also in business in 
Winnipeg for a time. In 1899 he 
entered the implement trade with 
the Northwestern Implement and 
Wagon Co., of Minneapolis, later 
travelling for them in the Da- 
kotas. He later became a terri- 
torial agent for the Grand Detour 
Plow Co., in western U.S. terri- 
tory and in 1909 was appointed 



assistant manager of the Rock 
Island Plow Co., Minneapolis. In 
1913 he became manag"fer of the 
Rock Island branch at Minnea- 
polis, and in 1920 became sales 
manager of the Actuating Farm 
Gate Co., in that city. He re- 
cently accepted the position of 
general sales manager of the New 
Owaitonna Mfg. Co. 



Deere Makes Improvements on 
Tractor Plow Line 



David Drehmer, manager of 
the John Deere Plow Co., Win- 
nipeg, has just returned to the 
city following a short vacation to 
French Liok, Indiana, and a sub- 
sequent visi't to the Deere factory 
at Moline. 

Mr. Drehmer reports that a 
marked improvement in condi- 
tions has taken place since his 
last visit south. In keeping with 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER*S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
district. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



the determination of the historic 
house to be in the first rank in 
any new departure or develop- 
ment in implement production, 
the factory is specially engaged 
in these days on certain improve- 
ments in its well-known line of 
farm power machinery and im- 
plements, notably in its No. 40 
plow, specially designed and built 
for use with the Fordson tractor. 
This famous plow is now pro- 
vided with a special self-adjust- 
ing hitch and a rolling landside 
which counteracts side pressure 
against the furrow wall and 
greatly reduces draft. 

The Deere No. 45. plow (a 
three-wheel tractor plow for 
other two-plow light tractors 
than the Fordson) has also been 
greatly improved and given in- 
creased facilities for quick and 
clean work. Stocks of these are 
kept well ahead to insure immedi- 
ate delivery and samples are be- 
ing placed with the many agents 
of the company throughout West- 
ern Canada. 



U.S. Tractor Demonstrations 



The semj-annual meeting of the 
Tractor and Thresher Depart- 
ment, National Implement & 
Vehicle Association, was held at 
Chicago, April 22nd. 

J. B. Bartholomew, president of 
the Avery Company and chair- 
man of the National Tractor & 
Demonstration Committee, an- 



No Protection Since 1896 

If Canadian Grain Growers and Farmers believe in the practical operation of Free 
Trade, why not buy from the only surviving strictly all-Canadian Company that has 
battled and won in open competition with the world, and is independent of any Trust 
or Combine. 

BRANTFORD BINDER TWINE 

is made by an all-Canadian industry that has had no tariff protection 
since 1896. Brantford Binder Twines are sold on a basis price and 
quality, and our production and sales have increased from 80 tons a 
year to 10,000 tons a year. These facts testify to our exceptional quality, 
and we are now the largest manufacturers of Binder Twine under the 
British flag. 

For length, strength, evenness, general appearance and full value, 
Canada's 4 Famous Maple Leaf Brands are unequalled. 

All our fibres are submitted to a special treatment to make them 
insect proof. 

We invite comparisons with other twines. 
Your enquiries will receive our most prompt attention. 

THE BRANTFORD CORDAGE COMPANY 

LIMITED 
Brantford, Canada 

Western Canadian Office: 162 Princess St., Winnipeg, Man. 




nounced the personnel of the 
committee as follows: 
. E. J. Gittins, J. I. Case Thresh- 
ing Machine Co.; J. A. Everson, 
International Harvester Co. ; C. 
B. Sharpe, Cleveland Tractor Co. ; 
G. I. Gillette, Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. ; Harry B. 
Bates, Bates Machinery and 
Tractor Co.; Donald McDonald, 
B. F, Avery Co.; A. H. Gilbert, 
Rodk Island Plow Co.; F. P.' 
Mount (Ex-Officio Member), Ad- 
vance Rumely Co. 

The sentiment of the meeting 
was strongly in favor of holding 
tractor demonstrations in the 
U.S. this year. The committee 
will put on one or more demon- 
strations, the number and place 
to be determined later. 



Made-in-Winnipeg Exposition 



From May 9th to 14th a 
Made-in-Winnipeg exposition 
will be held in the Board of Trade 
Auditorium, Winnipeg, at which 
will be shown a remarkable var- 
iety of products manufactured in 
the city. This exposition, every 
inch of space for which has been 
booked, will show the importance 
of the lines produced in the city. 
The purpose is 'to develop in- 
dustrial life and the policy of 
buying Winnipeg-made goods. 
Amongst the many lines shown 
will be farm equipment and im- 
plement specialties manufactured 
in Winnipeg, the variety showing 
that the manufacture of this class- 
of goods in the West is steadily 
increasing. 



Splitdorf Enter Canada 



The Splitdorf Electrical Co., 
Newark, N.J., one of the largest 
manufacturers in the world of 
ignition equipment, has taken an 
Ontario charter and formed the 
Splitdorf Electric Co. Ltd., with 
headquarters at 469, Yonge St., 
Toronto. The company will con- 
tinue to distribute Splitdorf spark 
plugs, magnetos and piston rings 
through Canadian dealers — Split- 
dorf products being standard 
equipment on a great variety of 
cars, trucks, tractors and engines 
sold in the Dominion. 

The officers of the company are 
as follows : President, R. W. 
Sutherland ; vice-president and 
general manager, C. K. Nelson, 
who has been for some time past 
manager of the Canadian organi- 
zation; treasurer, J. J. Fisher, 
holding similar office in the par- 
ent organization. 

There' will be no change in the 
general policy which has hereto- 
fore been followed. It is ex- 
pected, however, that the strictly 
Canadian company will be in even 
a bet'ter position to serve the 
automotive dealers. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



Lower Farm Costs 

mean More Tractor Sales 

P> OTH farmer and manufacturer are faced with 
^ the necessity for lower production costs. 

The biggest labor-saver, the most decided cost- 
cutter on the farm is the tractor. 

For that reason, this season is certain to see great 
activity in tractor sales. Farmers are through with 
experimenting. They will demand a simple, 
reliable and economical tractor such as the G-O. 

The G-O is rated at 14-28—4 cylinder engine burns gasoline 
or kerosene— low fuel consumption— all gears enclosed and 
running in oil— light weight for power— rigid construction— 
easily understood and adjusted— the right size tractor for the 
average Canadian farm. 

It will pay you to look into the merits of the G-O Tractor and 
the G-O dealer proposition. Write us. 

THE GENERAL ORDNANCE COMPANY 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

THE TRACTOR CO., Ltd., Saskatoon. Sask. ONTARIO WIND ENGINE & PUMP CO., Ltd., 
Distributor for Northern Saskatchewan Regina, Sask., Distributor for Southern Saskatchewan 

THE TRACTIONEERS, Winnipeg, Man. 
Distributor for Manitoba 



18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 




THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPROVINCIAL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 



A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF DEALERS IN AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES, ENGINES AND MACHINERY 



Established in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLD6. WINNIPEG, CANADA 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

$1.00 per year In Canada: Foreign $1.25 per year Single Copies, Ten Cents 

ADVERTISING 
RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this oflaoe not later than the 25th of the 
month preceding issue in whidh insertion is desired. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name. We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 



Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post OflBce as second class matter. 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, MAY, 1921 



It's a Good Time to Get Busy 



The fellow who penned the 
phrase: "If -you think you're 
beaten you are," voiced a great- 
truth. And that truth applies, 
more or less forcibly, to some im- 
plement dealers to-day. Such 
men have metaphorically thrown 
up their hands. The gloom bug 
has eaten its way into their sys- 
tem and has just sapped their 
energy. W e met such a man. the 
other day. His wail was : 
"What's the use of trying to sell 
goods. The farmer simply won't 
buy. He has quit buying and all 
the talk on God's earth won't 
alter 'the fact." 

Then a salesman went into that 
man's town. The dealer told 
him it was easier to sell coon 
coats in the infernal regions than 
seed drills locally. Remember 
this traveller was a salesman. 
"Jim," he said, "your feet are 
frigid. Show me your prospects. 
You won't improve things by sit- 
ting down at your desk and hang- 
ing crepe on your front door. 
Let's get out and get busy." 

To make a long story short, 
the salesman dragged that dealer 
out and they' fine-combed the 
drill prospects in the territory. 
Sure, they heard the old song — 
about the drop in crop values, 
the iniquitous price of imple- 
ments — and all the rest of it. But 
this salesman knew his line — and 
before he left that dealer he had 
sold seven drills. The dealer 
had contended that not a drill 
could be sold. The question is : 
Did he try hard enough? 
■ The main dif¥erence between 
the Orient and the Occident lies 
in the word "Kismet". It simply 
means : "What's the use." And 
because of that spirit of fatalism 
the Arab still remains as he was 
a thousand years ago. The policy 
of lying down to difficulties has 
no place in the implement trade 
to-day. When business is hard 
to get we must simply go after it 
all the harder. The plain, fact 
of the case is that, in cases, we 
are sufYering from the halcyon 
days of the war when grain prices 
were at the peak, implement 
shortage common, and you simply 
said : "Here's the plow, that's the 
price" — and took the order. 

Those days are dead. The 
order taker in any. line, especially 
in the implement business, is also 
going to be dead — unless he de- 
velops into a salesman. If the 
statement is ventured that goods 
cannot be sold in a given terri- 
tory, it should not be made until 
every possible effort, every arti- 
fice of 'the salesman's art, has 
been tried to procure business. 
Even then it is not according to 
Hoyle for a dealer to consider 



that he needn't try any more — 
to quit. No, sir, that's the time 
to try develop new plans, to 
tigh'ten your belt and go at it 
from a.nother angle. When we 
lose confidence in our ability to 
do business — we cease to do 
business. Determination and per- 
spiration are a better policy to- 
day than sitting down to con- 
ditions. 

The fact seems to be that the 
farmer's lugubrious outlook — and 
we admit it is not rosy — has 
affected not a few dealers. We 
claim that Ave never experienced 
times like these — but we have. 
We enormify conditions by sit- 
ting down and bemoaning them. 
The lad who keeps on the 
move, who does not quit, but 
who tries to sell, sell, early and 
late, has no time to worry about 
the senile decay of business. He 
keeps moving and his liver does 
not promote a jaundiced outlook 
upon life. This is a year that 
will truly reward fighters — not 
quitters. There were a handful 
of Canadians at a place called 
Ypres, back in 1915, Avho didn't 
have enough sense to quit — and 
they won out. We belong- to the 
same breed, don't we? Why 
then declaim that the bottom has 
dropped out of things. 

Truly farmers have cause for 
complaint, and the implement 
dealer being the first unit in the 
cycle of production of farm crops 



is nearest the seat of grievance. 
But, as a breed, dealers have 
never lacked courage in the worst 
crop years — nor should they to- 
day. The land is 'there and the 
crops will be put in and harves- 
ted. Agriculture is not a thing 
that a temporary depression can 
kill. 'In the last hundred years 
the tale of decreasing agricultural 
production because of prices has 
been worked to a frazzle. Let 
us forget about war-time prices 
and present prices. Will the 
farmer of 'to-day go back to the 
scythe, the flail, the single plow 
and all the back-breaking tools 
of the past? Would it pay him, 
whatever the price of grain? 
AVould he like the work involved? 
We would better forget about 
prices, we repeat, and by better 
and more economical farming try 
to reduce 'the cost of production 
on the farm. Selling implements 
is the same as selling anything 
else. It requires, under present 
conditions, steady effort ; no let 
up ; no lying down on the job, 
but the faculty of buckling into 
harness to develop business even 
where no business is apparent. 
Pessimism never moved goods 
and sales cannot be achieved 
without going after the prospect 
— or making one. Jonah once 
went through a shadowy 'time in- 
side a whale — but he came out 
all right. Even at that, who 
wants to be a Jonah? 



Freights and Farm Machinery 



There may be lines in which 
the annual freight movement 
considerably exceeds that of farm 
implements and machinery, but 
there are few commodities which 
represent greater weight or ship- 
ping capacity per unit. Freight 
rates have had, and will have, a 
A^ery marked effect upon the price 
of the individual implement to 
the conSvimer. Reasons for 
further increased rates at a. time 
Avhen farmers already declaim 
against the cost of machinery are 
not likely to arouse sympathy in 
the farm-machine industry. 

Higher rates affect the price of 
the product from the shipping of 
the iron and steel stock or hard- 
wood to 'the factory, through 
every stage in distribution until 
the dealer receives the finished 
machine. 

Figures show that the income 
of the United States railways, 
with increased rates, has fallen 
beloAv what it was before rates 
were raised. Last December 
'there was a shortage of half a 
million freight cars reported in 
the United States ; in the middle 
of April this year there were 
507,242 idle freight cars reported. 
Is the bulk of this traffic loss 
due to increased rates? If, in 
addition to high production costs, 
high freigh't rates raise the price 
of any commodity to a level 
where the public refuses to buy, 
it is obAaous that a further in- 
crease of rates will cause railway 
business to decline — not to im- 
prove. To-day our Canadian 
roads show reduced business. Is 
it likely to improve conditions 
and stimulate the movement of 
goods if the shipper be 'threatened 
with a further heavy increase in 
rates? In several lines the "buy- 
er's strike" has proven to be more 
than a mere catch-phrase. Higher 
rates will only tend to make ces- 
sation of buying more general, 
owing to the necessary reflection 
upon landed cost of the goods. 



Tractor Production in the 
United States 



It seems evident, in view of 
present conditions, that ithe pro- 
duction of tractors in the United 
States this year will show no 
record volume in output. The 
fact is that there was a great 
over-production in 1920 and the 
industry entered 1921 with an 
enormous number of tractors on 
hand and unsold. These tractors 
were produced from material at 
the highest known prices and by 
very highly paid labor. When 
the slump in sales came in the 
latter part of 1920, the carry-over 
to 1921 assumed great propor- 
tions. It is estimated ithat at the 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



19 



commencement of the year there 
were in the hands of the U. S. 
manufacturers' branch houses and 
dealers, close to 75,000 tractors. 
So far sales have not reduced this 
total very materially. 

Tractor manufacturers in the 
United States estimated that they 
would produce a total of 300,000 
tractors in 1920. It is estimated 
that the actual production was 
only about 200,000, of which the 
carry-over shown above formed a 
large percentage. In fact, 1920 
production fell below the estimate 
by 33 1-3 per cen/t. The United 
States exported 22,481 tractors in 
1920 ,the balance for domestic 
consumption being approximately 
178,000. In all something over 
100,000 tractors were sold in the 
United Sta^tes last year. 

The record of tractor produc- 
tion as shown by the U. S. depart- 
ment of agriculture gives the 
actual production and the number 
exported, also number sold in the 
U. S. The figures follow : 

No. 

No. No. sold 
Year Pro'd. Exp'd. in U.S. 

1916 29,670 1,858 27,812 

1917 62,742 7,988 39,229 

1918 132,697 23,550 193,746 

1919 164,590 28,552 108,298 

1920 200,000 22,481 102,519 

The number on hand at the end 

of each year was as follows: 1917, 
15.525; 1918, 15.401; 1919, 27,740, 
and in 1920, 75,000. Assuming an 
average demand this year the 
actual prodirction will not be so 
great as in former years. In 1919 
only 1.827 tractors were manufac- 
tured in Canada. 



Make Your Sample Separator 
Pay 



The importancie of attractive 
samples in developing cream 
separator business cannot be 
over-estimated. The machines 
should be in a good position on 
the floor, easily got at, and should 
be kept in a clean and attractive 
condition. In most cases women 
cast the deciding vote in buying 
a separator, and if the machine is 
dirty and the supply can is piled 
full of old newspapers, tools, and 
a horse collar adding the finish- 
ing touch in decorations, it is not 
likely that the scrupulously neat 
housewife will choose ,this separa- 
tor to adorn her dairy. A separa- 
tor should be as carefully cleaned 
and polished as the stock of sil- 
verware or jackknives, and should 
i)e in such a position that the 
prospect can get at it without per- 
forming any acrobatic feats. 

I:t is easier for the dealer to 
discover cream separator pros- 
pects than for any line of imple- 
ments he handles. You cannot 
tell when a man will require a 
new binder, but by driving past 



a farmer's home you know whet- 
her he keeps cows. A brief visit 
will determine whether there is 
a cream separator in the place and 
in what condition it is. Cream 
separator prospects ought to be 
picked up on every trip to the 
country regardless of the nature 
of the errand, and with the help 
of the manufacturer in develop- 
ing these prospects by means of 
advertising campaigns, an un- 
usual amount of effort on the part 
of the dealer in developing the 
cream separator business is un- 
necessarv. 



Personal 



Securing Twine Business 



The farmer has talked much 
about the buying strike idea, and 
the thought occurs as to whether 
he will carry this idea into effect 
in^ connection with ordering his 
supply of binder twine for 1921. 
Should the farmer delay in plac- 
ing his orders, as usual, /the dealer 
will be blamed if he has not got 
the stock in hand. Even the far- 
mer who buys direct will, as " 
usual, depend upon the dealer for 
his requirements at the tail end 
of harvest. In this connection, 
Farm Implement News gives 
some good advice to (the dealers. 
It says editorially:" 

"If we were a dealer we would 
present the facts frankly to our 
customers and tell them that we 
could not undertake to supply any 
twine except thait which they 
bought in advance on uncondi- 
tional orders. We would try to 
save the farmers from their own 
folly by this plan and by selling 
only twine made by manufac- 
turers whose reputation in the 
trade is a guarantee of quality." 



Lightning Losses in Ontario 



During the year 1919, in the 
Province of Ontario, there was a 
total loss from lightning fires of 
$506,907. This loss may well be 
termed unnecessary waste, since 
good lightning-rods, properly in- 
stalled, are more than 99 per cent, 
efficient. While the loss for each 
fire caused by lightning in 1919 
averaged $714, the total loss on 
two protected buildings that were 
struck amounted to $22. Many 
authorities advocate Government 
inspection of lightning-rod instal- 
lations, and a suitable discount 
in insurance rates for buildings 
properly protected. 



Tractor Farming Film 



The International Harvester 
Co. showed their 1,000-ft. film, 
entitled "Tractor Farming" in the 
Allen Theatre, Yorkton, on April 
15-16. This picture illustrates 
the famous Ti'tan tractor working 
under all conditions. 



R. McKenzie is a new dealer at 
Water hole. 

Wallin Bros, have opened a 
garage at Rama. 

J. J. Flick, of Pipestone, opened 
a garage recently. 

John Homaas has opened a 
garage at Naicam. 

J. D. Montgomery has joined 
the trade a't Biggar. 

Kamsack has a new machinery 
dealer in S. Fishtrom. 

J. Pennock has opened a har- 
ness shop at Brandon. 

Kenneth McGregor is selling 
implements at Granum. 

Ouellette Co. is a new imple- 
ment firm at Kenaston. 

Erickson has a new garage 
owner in Paul Gronbach. 

Robt. Harrop, of Lewvan, is 
succeeded by J. M. Rholl. 

Geo. W. Anstett, of McGee, is 
removing to Lenore Lake. 

The old firm of Mussell & 
Good, Denzil, is dissolved. 

Squire Bros, are dealing in cars 
and accessories, at Domremy. 

W. J. Brechin has started in 
the implement trade at Leipzig. 

Robert McAllister is a new 
machinery dealer at Kelvington. 

H. M. Jones is starting in the 
auto business at Gilbert Plains. 

Stafford & Ainley are dealing 
in implements and oils at Brooks. 

D. Peterson, dealer at Major, 
suffered a small fire loss recently. 

A. R. Burton has bought out 
J. Cobban, dealer at Rosetown. 

Hicks & Kirby are operating 
an automobile concern at Ninsa. 

Frank Shirtcliff is commencing 
an automobile business at Fran- 
cis. 

Chas. S. Stewart is succeeded 
by Maloney & McMillan at Sper- 
ling. 

John Voll has opened a farm 
machinery shop at North Battle- 
ford. 

L. J. McGhie is now owner of 
an implement concern at Lore- 
burn. 

R. D. L. Warren has opened 
an implement business at Isa- 
bella. 

Gunniss & Appel have joined 
the farm machinery fraternity at 
Togo. 

McGee & Mullet have opened 
an automobile concern at Dar- 
mody. 

F. S. McLennan, dealer at 
Wilkie, has sold out to W. A. 
Shaw. 

H. A. Williscroft has opened 
a battery service station at Drum- 
heller. 

J. W. Rheault, Harris, is leav- 



ing the trade, according to a 
report. 

Douglas Bros, have sold their 
farm machinery business at Zea- 
landia. 

George W. Coates, auto dealer 
at Delia, has sold to Mason and 
Keane. 

Rice Bros., of Raymore, have 
opened a garage and service 
station. 

J. W. Hannah is 'the latest addi- 
tion to the trade in the town of 
Rouleau. 

S. Strickland, implement dealer 
at Milestone, has sold out to E. 
Sheldon. 

C. H. McEwen, of Limerick, 
has taken a partner into his 
business. 

It is reported that D. Jansen 
has sold his farm machinery shop 
at Drake. 

C. H. AVillsie has opened a 
hardware and implement store at 
Beaufield. 

Collison Bros., Ranfurly, have 
entered the implement trade in 
that town. 

The implement stock of Peter 
Weber, at Denzil, was bought by 
J. McCann. 

Unrow & Dick have opened a 
farm machinery Avarehouse at 
Stuartburn. 

Todd & Parsons have discon- 
tinued their implement warehouse 
at Kitscoty. 

H. H. McCoy, of Bladworth, 
was bought out recentlv by W. 
B. Packard. ' • 

O. J. Winterham, auto dealer 
at Glen Ewen, sold out to Albert 
A. Malcolm. 

Brown & Man waring have 
opened an implement business at 
Swift Current. 

Peter Gancer has discontinued 
his garage and automobile busi- 
ness at Macrorie. 

Dale Chi'ttick, implement 
dealer at Dunblane, has sold out 
to John L. '\\'illianis. 

Stewart & Preston of Roland, 
have made a change in their 
partnership. 

Campbell & Vance, garage 
owners at Harris, suffered fire 
loss recently. 

P. P. Dick, Altona au'to and 
implement dealer, suffered from a 
fire loss recently. 

Henry & Turner are a new firm 
dealing in implements and har- 
ness, at Pathlow. 

Musgrove & De Gagne are 
running a garage and repair busi- 
ness in Balcarres. 

Mann Bros, report business 
satisfactory in their new ware- 
house at Yorkton. 

A. F. Berry is reported as hav- 
ing sold out his implement busi- 
ness, at Cartwright. 



20 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Richardson Bros., of McCon- 
nell, have opened a garage and 
implement business. 

Jos. Omstead, of Aneroid, is 
succeeded by J. J. Jacket in 'the 
implement business. 

Krienke & Krienke have com- 
menced in the farm machinery 
business in Southey. 

Taylor Bros, are reported to be 
commencing a garage and t«actor 
business at Kindersley. 

A. J. Stokes has moved his 
implement and harness business 
from Estuary to Burstall. 

Young & Highet have dis- 
solved their implement and gar- 
age business at Oak River. 

G. W. PhilHps & Son have sold 
their implement business at Kits- 
coty 'to Parsons & Phillips. 

J. S. Hunter has left the trade 
at' Stockholm. A. Stenberg^ has 
succeeded him in the business. 

The Creelman Motor & Tractor 
Co. Ltd., of Creelman, have in- 
creased their capi'tal to $20,000. 

New garages have been opened 
at Olds by AVhite & Ecklin, and 
at Seven Persons by E. Amos & 
Co. 

A. M. & O. W. Brown, partners 
in an automobile business at 
Leader, have dissolved partner- 
ship. 

Wm. Clarke, well known ma- 
chinery dealer at Brandon, has 



discontinued, according to a re- 
port. 

J. Massong & Sons, black- 
smiths at Hatton, have added 
implements to . their business in 
that town. 

The garage at Champion, 
owned by Fisher and Appleby, 
has been taken over by Perry and 
McCullough. 

The Mutual Oils Co. Ltd. have 
bought out the oil business of 
HofJman Bros, and Reiger, at 
Langenburg. 

J. Newman, of Hyas, hardware 
and implement dealer, has sold 
his hardware interests to the 
Manning Co. 

Booth & Stinson, partners at 
Treherne, are going to carry on 
the implement business individ- 
ually in 'that centre. 

H. W. Hutchinson, vice-presi- 
dent of the Sawyer-Massey Co., 
visited the Western branches dur- 
ing the past month. 

J. W. Ackland, president of 
D. Ackland & Son, paid a flying 
visit to Ottawa and other cities 
in Ontario during April. 

F. W. Nicholas has sold out his 
oil and garage business at Mile- 
stone but is continuing in the 
implement and auto line. 

. G. H. Johnson has opened in 
the machinery line at Tessier, 



The Right Pulley for Your Engine 



M 
A 
D 
E 

I 
N 

C 
A 
N 
A 
D 
A 




BERNARD'S 

Double Friction Pulley 

FOR GAS, GASOLINE AND OIL ENGINES 

Their excellent performance under every .conceivable working 
test has proved their dependability. They will outlast the 
machine they are attached to. 

DEALERS— Thi.s year it if5 important to fye< Ihv, bed at Iht lowed cod. It 
will pay vou to investigate. "Equipped with Bernard's Pulley" is now 

the strongest selling point of many a make of engine. 



The A. Bernard Industrial Co, 

FORTIERVILLE, QUEBEC, CANADA 



while in the same town L. F. 
Howsam has left the trade. 

P. J. Grout, manager of the 
Twin City Separator Co., recently 
returned from a trip through the 
territory. He visited Calgary and 
Edmonton. 

Three new machinery dealers 
to start up recently are: Russell 
Kennedy, Napinka; Stewart & 
Preston, Roland, and Guy A. 
Dakin, at Woodnorth. 

The Perfection Mfg. Co., of 
Montreal, manufacturers of the 
Perfection milker, announce the 
appointment of E. A. Lockyer as 
manager of their Toronto office. 

H. C. Wallace, president of the 
Link Mfg. Co., Portage la Prairie, 
recently returned to Manitoba 
after two weeks at the head office 
of the company at Kansas City. 

S. Roe, Calgary, and C. Roe, 
Regina, branch managers at those 
points for the Anderson-Roe Co., 
paid a visit to the Winnipeg 
headquarters the latter part of 
April. 

P. F. Cagnacci, automobile 
dealer at Langley Prairie, is 
building a fine new garage. The 
new building will be 40x70 feet 
and will have accommodation for 
twen'ty-five cars. 

George Riach, who has been 
with the Edmonton branch of the 
McLaughlin Motor Car Co., has 
became associated with the 
Motordrome, Ltd., 103rd Street, 
as general manager. 

J. A. Graham, formerly man- 
ager of the Yorkton branch of 
the Massey-Harris Co. Ltd., has 
been transferred to the Regina 
branch as manager, succeeding 
George Forsyth, who retired. 

A. T. Thorn, managing director 
of the Ontario Wind Engine & 
Pump Company, of Toronto, re- 
cently underwent an operation on 
his eyes, and was an hospital 
patient for a couple of weeks. 

H. A. Cof¥man, secretary and 
sales manager of the Hart Grain 
Weigher Co., Peoria, 111., is at 
present on a visit to cities in 
Western Canada, where he will 
call upon thresher distributors. 

D. N. Jamieson, manager of 
the R. A. Lister Co. of Canada, 
Winnipeg, spent a weelk in Al- 
berta the latter part of April. 
Mr. Jamieson visited their dis- 
tributors in Edmonton and Cal- 
gary. 

It is reported that the large 
implement, automobile and gar- 
age business, formerly carried on 
at Wapella by Kidd & Clements, 
is for sale. Both partners in the 
business are dead, hence the 
necessity for selling. 

P. F. Harrington, manager at 
Minneapolis for the Canadian 
Oliver Chilled Plow Works, was 
a recent business visitor to Win- 



nipeg. He states that his- com- 
pany are experiencing a good 
demand for their products. 

The J. I. Case Threshing Ma- 
chine Co. announce the appoint- 
ment of E. W. Pocock as assistant 
manager to A. H. Alfsen at Tor- 
onto. Mr. Pocock has been con- 
nected with 'the J. I. Case Co. at 
Winnipeg for the past ten years. 

R. H. Procter, general sales 
manager of the New Owatonna 
Mfg. Co., Owatonna, Minn., spent 
a week in Winnipeg recently. 
Mr. Procter visited Brandon, Re- 
gina, Saskatoon, Calgary and 
Lethbridge during his Western 
trip. 

O. F. Vaughan has been ap- 
pointed assistant manager of the 
Ontario branch of the Massey- 
Harris Co., Ltd., in charge of 
W estern Ontario, succeeding A. 
A. Campbell, recently made man- 
ager of the Massey-Harris branch 
a't Brandon. . 

J. A. Rollefson, a pioneer im- 
plement dealer in Swift Current, 
has discontinued his implement 
and hardware business in that 
town. Mr. Rollefson has entered 
the life-insurance business and 
will be. district agent for the 
Excelsior Life. 

We have our troubles in these 
times but things might be worse. 
For instance, our old friend M. 
J. Rodney, now Australian man- 
ager of the International Harves- 
ter Co., says that it requires high 
tension salesmanship to sell bin- 
ers at $600 each. 

Congratulations to W. J. Wil- 
son, sales manager of Western 
Steel Products Co., Winnipeg. 
As interlocutor in the Kiwanis 
Minstrel Show, put on at ■ the 
Walker Theatre, Winnipeg, in 
aid of charitable institutions, W. 
J. was right in the Dockstader 
class. 

W. J. Jones, manager of Chris- 
tiansen Implements Ltd., Winni- 
peg, will leave for an extended 
trip through the West early this 
month. Mr. Jones will visit the 
trade in Saskatchewan territory, 
lie reports a very satisfactory 
demand this spring for their 
packers and mulchers. 

We regret to note the death, 
on April 18th, of John Jewell, 
father-in-law of W. J. Wilson, 
sales manager of Western Steel 
Products Ltd., Winnipeg. The 
deceased gentleman, was 72 years 
of age and was formerly a car- 
riage maker in Toronto. Inter- 
ment took place at Kennington, 
Ont. 

Thos. H. Boyd, shipper for 'the 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 
Winnipeg, died suddenly on April 
18th. Deceased had been with 
the company since 1912 and was 
a valued employee. The late Mr. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



21 



IMPORTANT 
DEVELOPMENTS IN 



JOHN DEERE 



FARM MACHINERY 
for the NEW SEASON 



ft 




I!- "Waterloo Boy" 

KEROSENE TRACTOR 

Is without doubt the most efficient all-round power engine and the greatest 
farm power economist operating to-day. 

You know the great original 12-25 H.P. twin cylinder champion that 
leaves no "trimmings" to be picked up after doing any job, whether in 
traction or belt work. The new Model "N" is in appearance practically 
the same as the "Boy" you are familiar with. There have been no 
sweeping changes. The real satisfaction owners of the tractor have in 
the past derived from its splendid work in the field and on the belt is 
conclusive evidence that no pronounced changes in the construction are 
necessary. 

Note, however, the following distinct advantages appearing in the 
new model: 

(1) New front axle greatly facilitating steering and enabling driver 
to turn in shorter radius. It is of the automobile type which takes the 
place of drum and chains formerly used. 

(2) The fuel tank has been raised several inches, giving added fall 
to the kerosene from tank to carburetor. 

(3) Note the compactness and accessibility of the one-belt combined 
fan and water circulating pump device. Fanners who own Waterloo Boy 
Tractors never have to worry about water in the field. They know that 

their engines will be properly cooled. The addition of several quarts every two or three days is usually sufficient. 

(4) Counterweights have been changed from inside to outside of crank case, giving easier access to bearings than formerly. 

(5) Belt pulley is now made with detachable rim. This great advantage will be greatly appreciated in the field. Remove the pulley and there is then 
no possibility of the lugs on wheels packing clods or stones against it. Its removal eliminates possible breakage. 

A BIG PAYING POTATO CROP 

IS assured if you handle it with a 

Hoover" Potato Planter 

The "Hoover" visible Potato Planter has earned its laurels by its 
extraordinary accuracy in the special job assigned to it and by its wonder- 
ful time and laboj-saving record. 

A first rate potato crop always commands ^ tip-top price and it is 
highly probable that, due to the fluctuating wheat market, a larger 
acreage than usual will be seeded to potatoes this year. 

Get a "Hoover" on your floor at once and you'll get excellent business 
from it without a doubt.. It is a marvel in agricultural machinery. The 

operator sees all planting operations; not a single seed "takes chances" 

it goes direct to the spot. Wheels are concave tired and both are drive 
wheels. 

Equipped with roller bearings and in every respect this implement is 
one of the most sensibly designed and strongly constructed tools on the 
market. Get our complete catalogue of this planter which is also made 
in a two-row size. 



John Deere -Dain Haying Tools 

Are the Making of the Hay Harvest 

The frame of the Dain mower is made in one solid piece and both 
tongue socket and pitman extension are heavily ribbed, to prevent 
vibration and insure stability. There are only three pieces in the entire 
gear mechanism: the large internal gear on the axle, the spur pinion 
and bevel gear cast as one, and the bevel pinion on the pitman shaft. 
These are so arranged that all strain and unusual side wear is 
practically eliminated. 

Both front and rear pitman shaft bushings are made of the finest 
bronze-bearing metal of great durability and easily replaced if neces- 
sary. The crank-wheel pin is 
made of high rolled steel, 
especially hardened and with 
polished surface. 





New Deere -Dain Mower 



The Floating Cutter Bar, by means of a large adjustable coil spring, is carried on the wheels, 
utilizing for traction all weight not required to keep the cutter bar down to its work. This mower is an 
implement without a kink, as is every hay-harvest tool with the name of Dain on it. Write and get 
complete information about the whole Dain line of hay-harvesting specialties— Sweep Rakes Hay 
Loaders, etc. 

John Deere Plow Company Limited 




WINNIPEG 



REGINA 



SASKATOON 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



LETHBRIDGE 



John 
Deere 
Sulky 
Rake 



Is a big business-getting hay tool 
because every man who has used 
it advertises its merits as a perfect 
hay gatherer and because of its 
lasting qualities and light drfat. 
Built entirely of steel and malle- 
able iron with many outstanding 
features, all contributing to its 
eflficiency. 



22 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Boyd was prominent in fraternal 
circles, being a deputy high chief 
ranger of the C.O.F. Members 
of the Fairbanks-Morse organiza- 
tion attended the funeral, which 
took place April 21st. 

Owing to an erroneous com- 
mercial report, it was stated in 
our last issue that Harvey Bros, 
had closed 'their farm machinery 
business at Macoun. W. A. Har- 
vey is still carrying on business 
at the old stand at Macoun.' At 
Assiniboia his brother handles an 
implement line, hence the con- 
fusion in the report. Mr. W. A. 
Harvey reports that farming 
operations have started in his 
territory under satisfactory con- 
ditions. 

E. B. Sawyer, president of the 
Cushman Motor Works, Lincoln, 
Neb., recently spent a week at 
the office of the Cushman Motor 
Works of Canada, Winnipeg. 
Mr. Sawyer reports that business 
conditions in the United States 
are improving and that the com- 
pany are experiencing a very 
satisfactory demand for , their 
light-weight engines. He is of. 
the opinion that good binder 



eng'ine business will be done in 
the coming season. 

We recently had a visit from 
Geo. Matheson, the well-known 
Saskatchewan implement dealer 
who formerly carried on an im- 
plement business at Craik. Mr. 
Matheson spent a few weeks at 
Craik taking care of his local in- 
terests. He has returned to On- 
'tario but so far has made no 
definite arrangements for the fut- 
ure. George thinks he'll be back 
West to see old friends in the 
fall. He is greatly improved in 
health following his temporary 
retirement from the worries of 
the implement business. 

E. A. Mott, vice-president of 
the Cockshutt Plow Co., Brant- 
ford, Ont., recently spent a week 
in the West making a quick trip 
to the Western branches of the 
company. Mr. Mott said : "Dur- 
ing my trip in the West as far 
as Alberta, I naturally took pains 
to observe agricultural condi- 
tions, also 'to augment my obser- 
vations by reports from the var- 
ious branches of our organiza- 
tion. Thfe' farming ^^i€ftitlook is 
very satisfactory." 



A Western Breaking Plow 



Do You Want an Experienced Assistant ? 

Man with over five years' experience in implement, tractor and auto business. 
Bookkeeper, expert salesman and repair man. Have excellent references from leading 
companies. Can start at once. For full particulars, address, L. A. R., caire of 
CANADIAN FARM IMPLEMENTS, WINNIPEG, MAN. 



For about ten years the Ed- 
monton Iron Works have been 
manufacturing the Van Slyke 
breaking plow, a strong and 
powerful implement to be used 
in breaking up land that has 
never been cultivated, and virgin 
soil with roots, stumps, brush, 
etc. The 1921 model is especially 
designed for use behind light 
engines with 10 to 15 h.p. draw 
bar pull. 

This plow lays a flat, unbroken 
furrow. It is different from the 
ordinary grubbing plow in the 
peculiar and' original gradual 
slope of the moldboard. This 
gives very easy draft in compari- 
son with the width of the turned 
furrow, and also enables a very 
flat furrow to be turned, the long 
rods on the end of the moldboard 
ensuring the furrow being turned 
completely. The manufacturers 
of the Van Slyke breaker state 
that plows with a very abrupt 
angle to the moldboard merely 
grub up the land, leaving all 
sorts of unevenness. With the 
Van Slyke it is possible to disc 
right after the breaker. The 
width of the carriage is unusual, 
making the plow very steady in 
operation, and it is invaluable in 
side-hill work. The side cutting 
fin on the landside cuts all roots, 
so there is no danger of the fur- 
row turning back or being left 



on edge. In practice, subsequent 
furrows can be struck in some 
inches from the previous one, 
thus permitting a wider turned 
furrow 'than the actual measure- 
ment of the: share. 

The 1921 model, cutting a 20- 
inch furrow, weighs 900 lbs. Its 
beam is over 8 ft. long and is 
strongly reinforced by steel 
plates. The landside, of ^-in. by 
3-in. steel, is about 6 feet long. 
The fin cutter undercuts the land- 
side of the furrow about 6 inches. 
The wheels of the Van Slyke are 
28 inches high, with wide and 
heavy 'tires, each wheel working 
independently, so that the plow 
may be set at any angle and to 
any depth from 4 to 10 inches. 
The lift gives a clearance of 6 
inches. Moldboard is of Ij^-inch 
steel and of exceptional length. 



Hitches- 



•w- 

for Every Farm Job 



The "Caswell" Binder Hitch 



Automatic — for use with any 
Tractor and any Binder 

It pays to use the best — use Caswell 




Hitches- 



for Team Use 



Perfect Equalizers 

IN ALL COMBINATIONS 

"Dreadnaught" Hitches "Westwo" Plow Hitches 




Write for Description and Prices 



D. Ackland & Son Limited 

WINNIPEG CALGARY 



Toronto Silos 



The Ontario Wind Engine & 
Pump Co., Toronto, recently 
issued a very interesting booklet 
entitled "Sunflower Ensilage in 
Toronto Silos." This publication 
gives a wealth of valuable infor- 
mation regarding the value of 
sunflowers as a silage crop, fully 
describing the methods of culti- 
vating this crop, of harvesting it 
and transforming it into ensilage. 

Full details of the construction 
of the Toronto silos are given, the 
features being clearly described 
and illustrated. Particulars are 
also igiven of the complete line of 
Toronto pneumatic ensilage cut- 
'ters — a line with a capacity of 
from 4 to 20 tons per hour. The 
Ontario Wind Engine & Pump 
Co. report that they are going 
after silo business in the West 
through their Western branch 
at Regina. Interested dealers can 
procure copies of this booklet 
from 'the branches of the com- 
pany at Winnipeg, . Regina or 
Calgary. 



Many a short cut means a long 
ride to the hospital. 

■ IIIIIIIIINIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlllllimillHIlM^^^^^ 

s ^ , 1 

I How is Your Stock of | 

I Bill Heads and | 

I Letter Heads? | 
1 • I 

I Is it running pretty low? | 

I If so write us and find | 
I out what is most up-to- | 
I date in this line. | 

i We will let you have all | ,^ 
I information promptly.. | ^ 

I The CTOVEL CO. Ltd. | 



A Comt)lele Printing Service = 



I Bannatyne Ave. WINNIPEG | 
iiniiiiiniimiiiniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiHiiiiHiiiiiin^ i 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



23 



U.S. Grain Growers Form 
Company 



On April 14, over one hundred 
delegates from the 23 leading 
grain growing states adojDted a 
grain marketing plan at a meet- 
ing held in Chicago. The plan 
provides for the incorporation of 
a non-stock, non-profit corpora- 
tion, to be known as The U.S. 
Grain Growers, Inc. This co- 
operative organization will be 
owned and controlled exclusively 
by growers of grain. It will em- 
body terminal sales agencies, 
warehousing facilities, a finance 
corporation and a marketing 
news service. Grain growers will 
be asked to take membership in 
the organization at $10 each. 

Membership application 
means that the grain grower will 
be asked to sign a conitract for a 
period of five years by which he 
agrees to sell his grain through 
the co-operative elevator or local 
grain growers' association. These 
agencies in turn will sign con- 
tracts with the U. S. Grain 
Growers, Inc., for the marketing 
of the grain. 



In view of the ramifications of 
the Grain Growers organizations 
in Western Canada, it will be 
interesting to follow the progress 
of this movement in the United 
States. In that country, as in 
Canada, the original idea of grain 
marketing may blossom into a 
selling scheme whereby the im- 
plement retailer and many other 
classes of retail men will be con- 
sidered as useless cogs in the 
wheel of distribution. Imple- 
ment interests in the States will 
have a parallel to consider from 
our experiences in the Canadian 
West. 



The Standardization of Parts 



Prices of Engines in Great 
Britain 



Engine manufacturing con- 
cerns in Great Britain are at 
present making a big selling- ef- 
fort for farm types. One line 
shows quotations for 3^ to 4 
h. p. engines of $262.50, and 5 
h.p. $350. Another line has the 
following prices, for engines com- 
plete with pulley and skids: 2 
b. h. p., $310; 3 b. h. p., $340; 5 
b. h. p., $430 and 7 b. h. p., $550. 



The bill introduced at Ottawa 
by A. B. McCoig, M.P., regarding 
the standardization of parts of 
farm machinery, has been re- 
ferred to the Committee on Agri- 
culture and Colonization. In 
view of the apposition to this 
measure and of the technical 
ijroblems involved, it seems un- 
likely that much will be done in 
this connection. As a matter of 
fact, farm machinery is largely 
in the process of mechanical de- 
velopment. Until perfection in 
every unit be attained, standardi- 
zation will be held back. Should 



improvements in structural de- 
sign, in methods and mechanical 
efficiency, take place, what is 
standardized may rapidly become 
obsolete. Yet there are many 
minor features in implement de- 
sign which to-day can be stan- 
dardized with profit to the indus- 
try and ithe farmer. Such stan- 
dardization need not kill the indi- 
\ iduality of the machine as is so 
often claimed. Because tractor 
motors are largely standardized 
has not eliminated the individu- 
alitv of the tractor. 



Some never get round to being 
square. 



Magneto Repairs and Replacements 




We carry in stock at all times BOSCH, BERLING, DIXIK 
and K-W Magnetos. 

Over 500,000 repair parts for all systems, and $20,000 
worth of special equipment enable us to give a 24-hour 
repair service on all makes and a real guarantee with 
each repair. 

Send for catalog to-day. 

Special terms to dealers. 

Acme Magneto & Electrical Co. Ltd. 



148 PRINCESS ST. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



The Foremost Electrical Repair Shop in Canada 



Quality Products for Quality Dealers! 




Farm Tractors 



12-22 H.P. 



16-30 H.P. 



THE SIMPLEST TRACTOR BUILT 

We are exclusive sales agents in Canada for this line. Eagle Tractors are unequalled for 
both field and belt work. 12-22 H.P. has 7 x 8-in. stroke, twin-cylinder, valve-in-head 
motor. 16-30 H.P., 8 x 8-in. stroke, twin-cylinder, valve-in-head motor. Horizontal slow- 
speed, heavy duty engines that give smooth, steady power for threshing. Note the large 
wide-faced belt pulley — right where it belongs. Use kerosene or gasoline. Dixie ignition; 
impulse starter. Schebler carburetor; Hyatt heavy-duty bearings; force-feed lubrication. 
Ask for literature. 

Waterloo" Champion Separators 

20x36 24x36 24x42 28x42 33x52 36x56 and 40x62 

Canada's foremost threshers. A 
size for every farm. Guaranteed 
grain savers, they do clean, fast 
and efficient work under all condi- 
tions. Complete with wind stacker, 
feeder, wagon loader and register. 






"Rock Island" Tractor Plows 

Nos. 9 and 12. — Work perfectly with any 
tractor. Have famous CTX moldboard. Furrow 
wheel lift, 2, 3 or 4 bottoms. 

"Rock Island" Tractor Discs 

No. 38 Tractor Disc is in big demand. Gangs 
work independently. All levers operate from 
tractor. 8 and 10-ft. sizes. 



Heider Tractors, 12-20 and 9-16 H.P. 

Have over thirteen years' satisfactory field work behind them. The Heider calls for 
minimum service. No gears to strip — 15 to 20 per cent fewer parts. Seven speeds, for- 
ward and reverse, with one lever, all on one motor speed. No transmission gears. Resistless 
pull without jerking or vibration. Use gasoline or kerosene without carburetor changes. 

GET OUR ATTRACTIVE SALES PROPOSITION 
Our Line includes: Kerosene and Gasoline Tractors, Plows. Discs, Portable and 
Traction Steam Engines. Separators, Wind Stackers, Baggers, Threshers' 
Supplies, etc. 

The Waterloo Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 



RE GIN A 



CATALOGS SENT ON REQUEST 



PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE 

Alberta Distributors: 
United Engines & Threshers Ltd. , Calgary and Edmonton 



SASKATOON 



24 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Are You Operating on a Proper 
Business Basis? 



By A. A. THOMSON 



In the last issue of 'this publi- 
cation, "Old Timer" gave some 
very interesting views upon the 
status of the implement dealer. 
They all come back to the ques- 
tion : "What is an implement 
dealer?" 

It is the belief of 'the writer 
that the greatest essential for the 
implement dealer to-day is to 
know exactly how he stands. In- 
come tax papers had to be filled 
in last month. Was it a simple 
matter or the reverse?. For the 
dealer who carries on his busi- 
ness upon a proper business basis 
the job should not be formidable. 
To give an accurate return the 
dealer had to know the total value 
of the merchandise he sold, his 



inventory at the start and finish 
of 'the year, and his total ex- 
penses. Mark that last point — 
total expenses. Upon that de- 
pends success in the retail im- 
plement business to-day. If you 
have your total volume of sales 
and have an accurate record of 
what it cost you to secure that 
volume, you should know very 
accurately your percentage of 
overhead expense. 

In operating upon a proper 
basis the same fundamental laws 
apply to the retail implement 
store as to the large implement 
factory. That's a hard fact. 
Within the memory of most of 
us is the case of one manufac- 
turing concern that has under- 



Announcing the Latest Addition to 

the Famous ^^Bull Dog'' Line — the 

BULL DCXi 
CLEANER 
No. 6 

You 
Can't 
Equal 
It! 




Just 
Look 
at the 
Design ! 



Drive the No. 6 



Capacity: 225 to 250 
Bus. per Hour. 



A PERFECT SMALL POWER MILL FOR THE 
LARGE FARMER, MILLER OR SMALL ELEVATOR 

Built especially to meet the requirements of the man who wants to clean grain 
as fast as he threshes it, also for the small elevator and big farm. Look at itu 
Built like a battleship. Heavy hardwood frame, bolted and trussed. Upper shoe 
has side shake — lower shoe has end shake. Large suction fan takes off all chafiE and 
dust as grain leaves hopper, blowing it out of building. Overshot feed; force feed 
roller; re-cleaning system. Let us tell you about it. We can ship at once. 

Makers of the Largest Complete Line of Grain-Cleaning Machinery in 
North America, Capacities from 25 to 1000 Bushels per Hour, 

THE TWIN CITY SEPARATOR CO. Ltd. 

OUELCH STREET WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Address all correspondence from Southern and Central Alberta to 
R. W. DOW, Box 1406, Calgary, Alberta 



gone 'three re-organizations. Fin- 
ally they installed a cost system 
that necessitated an expenditure 
of $50,000. Ever since then that 
firm has been steadily prosperous. 
If this is worth while in a big 
concern, it is equally vital in 
your business, no matter how 
small it may be. Business re- 
cords are an essential. 

You know what you pay for 
the goods ; you Iknow what mar- 
gin you get for their re-sale. 
That's your profit. But do you 
know to a cent what it costs 
you to sell them? Do you keep 
a close tab on every expenditure 
in connection with your business? 
Do you pay yourself a wage or 
salary each month? Do you keep 
track of such operating expenses 
as the following: 

Wages paid your employees 
and yourself; rental, light, heat, 
repairs and maintenance to build- 
ing; operation and maintenance 
of any cars or trucks used in con- 
nection with your business ; taxes, 
licenses, insurance, freight, ex- 
press, cartage, telephone, office 
supplies, interest on borrowed 
capital, bank charges, deprecia- 
tion on premises and equipment, 
gavsoline, oils, tires, etc., etc. 

Unless you have a record of 
every item of expense in connec- 
tion with carrying on your busi- 
ness, you can not say whether 
you sell an implement at a profit 
or a loss — for you can not apply 
the correct overhead expense to 
the individual sale. 

The manufacturer and the 
wholesaler are blamed at times 
for conditions in the retail end 
of the game. Are conditions not 
at times simply what the dealer 
has made them? Unless he is 
thoroughly (-efficient and up to 
the minute in a business sense, 
sooner or later the ef¥ect mus't be 
felt. The implement business is, 
by long odds, the most important 
business in this country. All 
wealth comes out of the soil and 
before that wealth can be pro- 
duced the implement dealer and 
his stock in trade mus't be on 
hand. Is there any line in which 
the retailer should be more effi- 
cient or a better business man? 

The day is past for hit-and-miss 
methods in carrying on an im- 
plement business — for keeping 
all the records considered neces- 
sary in a dog-eared scribbler. 
The type of dealer who does not 
adopt proper business principles 
cannot hope to survive. What 
the trade requires, as Old Timer 
pointed out, is good men, know- 
ing the trade, serving the com- 
munity, men who run implement 
.stores with proper office systems 
and efficient methods. 

Service and Salesmanship 
The implement business cannot 
be regarded as a side line to eke 



out a living. The years ahead 
will demonstrate the fact that the 
dealer who is 'to survive is the 
man who not only knows how 
to run an implement business, 
but who can make money doing- 
it. Even as other classes of 
retail merchants devise means of 
being successful, so must the 
implement dealer. A man selling 
implements is selling one of the 
hardest products to place — high 
priced machines to men who have 
a concise knowledge of what 
those machines should do. The 
dealer should 'never be satisfied 
until he has proved 'to his satis- 
faction that a given system of • 
selling is the best. 

In this trade service to the 
customer is absolutely essential. 
Beyond this lies such features as : 
Personal contact with custom- 
ers; knowing the needs of your 
community and filling them by 
carrying the best possible goods 
for local conditions; advertising 
and keeping what you sell stead- 
ily before the farmer ; adherence 
to strict business methods regard- 
less of consequences. 

If your business can afford it, 
have minor details, such as book- 
keeping, clerking and such mat- 
ters seen to by someone you can 
hire. A $l5-a-weelk girl may be 
a very profitable investment for 
you — assuming that your have a 
well-defined and proper business, 
system for her to follow. Spe- 
cialize personally in the active 
work of solicitation and the main- 
tenance of the right kind of re- 
lationship with your customers. 
No dealer should ever forget the 
fact that the farmer always pre- 
fers to do business with the 
"boss" rather than any underling. 

Know the goods. There may 
be lines of business where sales 
bluff and talk, where generalities 
will get sales — but this will not 
apply to the implement business. 
Study every implement, its de- 
sign, construction, functions and 
adaptability. Further, the real 
implement dealer must be a little 
more than half a farmer. He 
must know field conditions and 
what the implement has to do. 
He must be able to show, at 
every point in a sale, why the 
implement will pay as an invest- 
ment, why it is superior, why the 
farmer will find it do the job for 
which it is made quickly and 
economically. 

The dealer can never expect 
that margins will be completely 
satisfactory so long as he is not 
competent to close sales himself. 
The cost of sending special can- 
vassers or salesmen to close 
deals, to turn prospects into 
orders, is a factor that the dealer 
should do without. Any man can 
locate prospects — but the real im- 
plement dealer is the man who 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Inriplements 



25 




Quality and Value make 
Ideal Fence the most Profit- 
able Line you could Handle 

Everywhere you go in Canada you will see Ideal Fence — 
along the railway and highways, around farms, around 
town and city homes and parks. Wherever lasting fence 
protection is required Ideal is chosen, because every test 
proves it to be the strongest and best fence made, yet it 
sells for no more than ordinary fence. 

We are backing Ideal quality and worth with a strong 
advertising campaign, which is having beneficial results for 
Ideal Fence dealers. We offer you the same co-operation. 

Write for our attractive Dealer Proposition 

Ideal Fence and Spring Company of Canada, Limited 

Windsor, Ontario Winnipeg, Manitoba 













'Miiiii 


lii! 


■lii 














El 








1 pnm 










itilliflifi 



Two Profits From 
SILO SALES 

THE DEALER who sells the Ideal Green 
Feed Silo makes two profits. The first 
one is his regular dealer's profit; the 
second and much larger profit is the one 
that comes to him through the immed- 
iately increased prosperity of his commun- 
ity. Actually the second profit is so large 
and so certain that, if necessary, the dealer 
could well afford to forgo his selling margin. 



Would immediately increase land values and the 
farmers' buying power. Credit sales and bad debts would 
be reduced to the minimum and the dealer's capital would 
turn over three times where it turns once to-day. Agri- 
cultural prosperity follows the use of the Silo; it means the 
equivalent of June pastures in January and greater pro- 
duction at less cost. 

THE IDEAL SILO 

Is made of carefully selected materials and every 
detail of it is fully up to the high standard of other 
De Laval products. Years of experience in Silo construc- 
tion have taught us every requirement, with the result 
that the "Ideal" is in fact what its name implies. The 
sale of Silos will represent a big business this year and in 
future years and with the two-fold profit in mind, every 
De Laval dealer should immediately take steps to benefit 
himself and his community by securing a contract for the 
sale of the Ideal. 

Catalogue and full particulars on request. Act now, so that your 
customers may make provision for a silage crop this year. 



Vancouver 



The De. Laval Company Ltd. 



WINNIPEG 



Edmonton 




International 
Agents — — — 

Make This a 
Primrose Year 



THE SATISFACTION which users find in Primrose Cream Separators is due to quality. 
These separators are made as mechanically perfect and efficient as it is possible to make a 
separator. They are products of a Company backed by ninety years of manufacturing ex- 
perience, whose reputation as makers of dependable farm equipment is world-wide. 

The Primrose is the only separator with two wide-open cream outlets. The regulating screw 
is in the skim milk outlet, where adjustment is easy. Instead of restricting the small volume 
of cream, the large volume of skim milk is regulated. 

Primrose separators get all the cream. Capacities range 
from 350 to 850 ppunds of milk per hour. Direct power 
drive and electric motor drive equipment are available. 

Factors like these make Primrose sales for the International 
agents. It is the proper time for redoubling effort on sales. 
Cash in on dairying prosperity and Primrose value. 



International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA 



Arrange your prospect lists and call on the co-operation of the 
branch house. 



HAMILTON CANADA 

' WESTERN BRANCHES — Brandon Winnipeg. Man Calgary Edmonton. LEThbriDGE AlTa.. 

ESTEVAN. N BATTLEFORD. REGINA SASKATOON YORKTON. SASK. 

EASTERN BRANCHES - Hamilton London Ottawa Ont. Montreal. Quebec. Que.. St John N B. 



26 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



gets his prospect and sells them. 
Let the dealer depend upon his 
own efforts and he will make 
more money in the end. 

Herein lies 'the necessity for 
the dealer of to-day studying 
salesmanship. Wherever possible 
use the experience of the trav- 
eller, who is usually an efficient 
salesman. All ideas to the con- 
trary, salesmanship is not "hot 
air" — and in the years ahead only 
the salesman will succeed in the 
retail implement trade. Knowing 
the goods, knowing how to sell 
them and knowing what it costs 
to sell them — with these three 
qualities a man should be able to 
make a success of the retail im- 
plement trade. And we repeat: 
It is not a business that can be 
made successful as a side issue — 
a possibility of business simply 
when business offers. In direct 
ratio to 'the importance of the im- 
plement business is it necessary 
that the men retailing implements 
be trained salesmen, good execu- 
tives, energetic, efficient and busi- 
ness-like in conducting their oper- 
ations. The dealer who possesses 
these qualities will not be heard 
to declaim that as a calling re- 
tailing implements is profitless. 



A New Sharpies Separator 



The Sharpies Separator Com- 
pany has shown a most keen in- 
sight into the agricultural and 
trade conditions of the country 
just at this time, as is evidenced 
by the big sales campaign 
started March 1st. The fact that 
the farmers were putting off the 
purchase of cream separators this 
year for various reasons led this 
company to come to the decision 
that a decided ' stimulus was 
neces.'^ary in the separator busi- 
ness, and the story of the Sharpies 
machines and 'the Sharpies plan 
has been told to the Canadian 
farmer during the past month 
through the agricultural papers. 

This publicity dealt with the 
development of the new sizes of 
the Sharpies suction-feed separ- 
ator at a popular price, as well 
as the announcement of a general 
reduction of prices on the full 
Sharpies dairy separator line, 
which brought these prices to 
■ practically a pre-war level. 

The new Type C Sharpies 
suction-feed separator was devel- 
oped for the average farmer ; that 
is, the farmer who milks only a 
few cows. With a capacity of 



200 pounds, this machine is 
stated to meet the requirements 
of hundreds of thousands of 
farmers who have not felt that 
they could use a larger machine 
and, at the same time, 'the quan- 
tity production on this machine 
enables the Sharpies Company to 
quote a price of $50 cash, f.o.b. 
factory. 

The complete story of the Type 
C machine has been told to the 
farmers and the response has 
been remarkable, says the manu- 
facturer, indicating that this ma- 
chine is meeting a very popular 
demand and one that should 
enable the dealers to cash in, in 
a big way, on this business. The 
Type C machine is claimed to 
have every exclusive feature of 
the regular Sharpies suction-feed 
machine, such as the suction-feed 
principle, which enables it to 
skim clean and deliver a cream 
of even density at any speed at 
which the machine may be 
turned ; the Sharpies tubular 
bowl, with no discs, and the per- 
fect automatic oiling system of 
the Sharpies machine. It is being 
sold through the Sharpies Can- 
adian branch houses at Toronto 
and Regina. 



Lockyer with Perfection Mfg. 
Co. 



E. A. Lockyer, who for the 
past couple of years has been 
sales manager for H. F.' Bailey 
& Son, of Gait, Ont., has resigned 
and has accepted a position as 
branch manager at Toronto for 
the Perfection Manufacturing 
Co., of Montreal and Vankleek 
Hill, Ont., manufacturers of the 
Perfection milker. 



Tractors Tow Barges 

Tractors are now employed in 
towinig canal boats of 350 to 400 
tonnage between Liege and 
Antwerp in Belgium. It " 'takes 
from five to six days to make the 
ninety-five mile trip. 



A New Battery 

A new storage battery has been 
put on the local mailket by the 
Climax Manufacturing Co., Win- 
nipeg. This battery is manufac- 
tured in Winnipeg and when put 
through stringent tests was found 
so reliable that the concern are 
able to give a guarantee of eigh- 
teen months with every Climax 
they turn out. 





THE FARMER'S POLICY:— MORE ACRES 
IN LESS TIME— AT LOWER COST 

The value of his products is less. He must reduce operating costs to the minimum, 
but must increase his acreage. He will buy the power equipment that will give him 
most for his money, in value, service and efficiency. That is why the G.S.M. line will be 
in big demand. 

Made-in-Canada "Beaver" Tractors, "Ideal" Windmills, "Maple Leaf" Grinders, Type 
"K" Kerosene Engines, Concrete Mixers, Steel-Saw Frames, Power amd Hand Pumps, 
Pumping Equipment, Steel Tanks. There are also Plows, Threshers, etc. 

Type "K^^ Brantf ord Kerosene Engines 

Economical, Reliable Power for the Farm 

If your engine business is not profitable there's a reaspn. Handle the type "K" perfect 
kerosene burner and watch your sales grow. There are three sizes, 2, 4 and 7 H.P. This 
engine is equipped with a speed change device, governor, magnto ignition and has built-in 
fuel tank. Send for our latest engine literature. 




Brantford Ideal" Junior 
Batch Concrete Mixers 

A splendid machine for the farmer or small contractor. 
Thoroughly mixes from 4 to 6 yards per hour. Drum 
has 15 mixing blades. Supplied with either 2^4 or 354 
H.P. Ideal vertical engine, which is protected from dust 
and dirt by steel casing. Friction clutch controls chain 
and sprocket drive. Heavy steel frame and steel truck. 
Very little vibration. Outfit weighs 2,200 or 2,50t 
pounds. Send for details. 



" Ideal " Pumping Windmills 
The Cheapest Power Sold 

The "Ideal" double-geared pumping windmill has few 
working parts. Coupled with a perfect lubricating 
system, the roller and ball bearings assure operation in 
the lightest breeze. Automatic adjustment to wind — 
the famous "Pull in" design; they brake automatically 
with no chance of a wreck. The "Ideal" has a strongly 
built and braced tower, girted every five feet. 



"Beaver" 15-30 Tractor 



DEPENDABLE POWER FOR ALL 
:: FIELD AND BELT WORK :: 



The "Beaver" 15-30 is the most finished product on the Canadian Tractor Market. Equipped with a 4-cyl. 
5 X 61/4, special kerosene motor it gives unequalled service in ,all haulage and belt work; develops 50 h.p. on the 
belt It has a patented 7-speed friction transmission which does away with all jerking, gives perfect control 
and' reduces working parts 15 to 20 per cent. Frame is heavy; wheels extra strong and a light, strong, serviceable 
canopy means comfort for the driver in the hot weather. 

Write for literature on the "Beaver" 15-30. Secure your territory be- 
fore your competitor snaps it up. No duty — no exchange, reasonable 
Special sales offer and liberal quantity discount. Line up with 




Goold Shapley&. MuirCo. Limited 

Distributing Warehouses: Portage la Prairie, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon 

Factory— Brantford Western Head Office— Regina 



iliiiiiiim iiiiiili 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



27 



Ignorant Wheat 

Seed wheat is a very ignorant grain. It 
does not even realize that there is such a 
thing as- business depression. It knows 
not the meaning of the word "wait" or 
"hesitate." 

It has just one interest in life — to be 
fruitful and multiply. When its time comes 
to ripen, it won't wait for farmer or dealer 
to get the twine they were late in ordering. 
Ordering Binder Twine now will insure 
your getting your twine in time. Your 
customers will be ready when the wheat 
ripens. 



Plymouth Cordage Co* 

Welland, Canada 

Canadian Distributing Agencies 
W. G. McMahon Hobbs Hdw. Co., Ltd. 

(Representing Lindsay Bros.) Toronto* Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 





PLYMOUTH TWINE 



5-3S 



28 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



International Harvester Report 
Shows Record Volume but 
Reduced Profits 



The annual report of the Inter- 
national Harvester Co., for the 
year 1920, shows that last year 
the company did the largest busi- 
ness in its history, ye't the net 
profit was smaller than in 1919. 
Total sales aggregate $225,000,- 
000, compared with $212,000,000 
in 1919 and $204,000,000 in 1918. 
Notwithstanding the difficulties 
of foreign trade, owing to higher 
freights and exchange conditions, 
the volume of foreign sales, in- 
cluding Canada, was the largest 
in the company's history, 'total- 
ling $60,000,000. The net profit in 
1920 was $16,655,000, which com- 
pares AV ith a profit of $20,011,000 
in 1919 before deducting the bal- 
ance of war losses charged of¥ 
that year. The percentage of net 
profit to the capital invested was 
7.9 per cent in 1920 and 9.6 per 
cent in 1919 before charging ofif 
war losses. Gross earnings total- 
led $23,160,074. Deduc'tions of 
$6,032,721 for interest on loans, 
ore and timber extinguishment, 
plant depreciation, special main- 
tenance, provision for losses in 
receivables, etc., ' left the net 
profit, as stated, a't $16,655,000, 
as above : 

"Machine selling prices in 1920 
showed an average increase of 



about 60 per cent, above pre-war 
prices, and repair parts showed 
an average increase of only 40 
per cent", the report says. "The 
average increase in prices of all 
commodities for 1920 was 143 
per cent over 1914. The com- 
pany derived practically no in- 
crease in machine selling prices in 
1920 over the preceding year while 
manufacturing costs increased 
more than 10 per cent, due prin- 
cipally to higher material 
markets and higher wages paid 
to labor. The average number 
of employees on the payroll in 
1920 . was 48,280, with a' total 
compensation of $89,930,000, as 
against 40,480 employees in 1919, 
with a total payroll of $63,040.- 
000." 

Under the company's new ex- 
tra compensation and stock 
ownership plan, adopted in and 
effective for 1920, whereby 60 per 
cent of the profit in excess of 
7 per cent on 'the invested capital 
goes to the employees, $2,760,263 
will be distributed about May 1 
among about 24,000 eligible em- 
])loyees. This extra compensa- 
tion amounts to 1J4 per cent of 
'the sales for the year. . 

The capital expenditures dur- 
ing the year aggregated $13,550,- 
000 for new plants, additions, ex- 
tensions and improvements to ex- 
isting properties. These included 



the purchase of the Richmond 
plant of the American Seeding 
Machine Co., the plant of the 
Springfield Spring Co., Spring- 
field, O., and a site for a twine 
plant at New Orleans. 

Collections Declined 

Cash collections on business 
transacted during the year were 
87 per cent in 'the United States, 
75 per cent in Canada and 70 per 
cent in European and other for- 
eign trade. Collections were un- 
usually good in the first half of 
the year, but declined seriously 
in the latter half, resulting in a 
smaller volume of cash than in 
1919, when 94 per cenl was col- 
lected in the United States, 80 
per cent in Canada and 75 per 
cent in other countries. The 
average for five years preceding 
the war was 77 per cent in the 
United States and 45 per cent in 
Canada. 

The annual report makes pub- 
lic for the first time the fact that 
the company has made plans for 
building a binder twine mill at 
New Orleans. The report shows 
that a 21-acre site, on the Missis- 
sippi River opposite New Orleans 
has been purchased for that pur- 
pose. 

The company's industrial coun- 
cil plan, adopted in March, 1919, 
has been very successful. There 
are now 22 work councils and 



17 5 employee representatives. 
There are 8,200 employee share- 
holders. Last July an increase 
was authorized in the preferred 
stock from $60,000,000 to $100,- 
000,000, and in commo.n stodk 
from $80,000,000 to $130,000,000. 

The additional property value 
of the company in Canada is 
given as $617,856 for 'the year, 
and in the United States as 
$8,054,559. During the year bad 
debts- totalling $678,310 were writ- 
ten off. Two million dollars was 
was provided for a reserve to meet 
collection expenses. Farmers' and 
dealers' notes receivable amoun- 
ted to $36,940,853, and accounts 
receivable to $23,778,877. Under 
its pension system the company 
paid $278,000 in 1920. 

The ■ engine, cream separa'tor 
and tractor capacity of the Mil- 
waukee plant is shown as 150,000 
• machines, with 30,000 tractors as 
the annual capacity of the Chi- 
cago works. The four twine 
plants have an annual capacity 
of 142,000 tons. Under normal 
conditions the wagon works at 
Chatham have a capacity of 
15,000 jobs; the Hamilton works 
of 125,000 tillage implements. 



Even the postage stamp can be 
licked, if- you do the job behind 
his back. 




Drawbar 14 H.P. 
4 Cylinder 5x6 Motor, 28 



Progressive Dealers Value the 

WHITE LINE 

Because of its Established Repu- 
tation and Unequalled Quality. 

White quality backed by the White 
guarantee for service, will give you 
prestige and profits. 

WRITE TO'DAY FOR OUR DEALER PROPOSITION. 
IT SHOULD INTEREST YOU. 



The New White Allwork Tractor 



Nothing made in farm engines is more simple and effective-whether used 
in traction or belt work-than this All-Purpose Tractor The new 1921 
Model operates at three speeds, is equipped with '^""^^^^.^""S/^,,*!*"^ 
out, detachable cyUnder heads and other improvemnts. It is a four-wneei, 
four cylinder engine with heavy duty tractor motor Pl^<:ea crosswise on 
double channel reinforced steel frame. Direct dnve-no chains or bevel 
gears; all gears enclosed and oiled automatically; high tension ma^eto 
with impulse starter. Automobile steering device; g^ranteed to burn 
kerosene^without water successfully under all loads Big reserve po^Jer^ 
Shipping weight only 5,200 lbs. Built throughout from the best quality 
material to give economical and eflacient tractor service 



White Challenge Separators 

are the choice of farmers who want a machine to do Speedy, 

Clean, Efficient Work at a Minimum Cost. 

The whole machine from feeder to stacker « built from 

experience to do fast, thorough ^"^^ "°Jf il"^^^*^'"^ 

BuUt in sizes: 20 x 36, 24 x 40, 28 x 46, 32 x 54, 36 x 60, 40 x 65^ 

We have a full line of new and rebuilt steam engines, also 

thresher supplies. 

Send for full descriptive material. 



The GEO. WHITE & SONS COMPANY Limited 



MOOSE JAW, Sask. 



BRANDON, Man. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



29 



Canadian Twine Plant Busy 



The Brantford Cordage Co., 
Bran'tford, Ont., manufacturers of 
binder twine, state that their 
mills have been operating at ut- 
most capacity continuously 59 
hours per week and have only 
closed down for five days for 
necessary repairs in the last eigh- 
teen months. This gives some 
idea of the volume of twine and 
cordage produced. 

C. L. Messecar, general man- 
ager, states that the Brantford 
Cordage Co. are now the largest 
makers of binder twine in the 
British Empire. The Binder 
Twine Association of the United 
Kingdom recently stated that no 
binder twine plant in Great Brit- 
ain compares with the Brantford 
concern as regards production. 
The output of the largest British 
producers does not exceed 3,000 
to 4,000 tons, and only one British 
plant comes within reasonable 
distance of the output of the 
Canadian concern. Mr. Messecar 
concedes that the labor and fibre 
situation has been a problem for 
the past three "or four years, but 
with present improved conditions 



believes the quality of their 
binder twine this year is equal 
to, or better than, they have ever 
produced. 



Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co. 
Shows Lower Earnings 



The annual statement of the 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co. 
Ltd. head office, Montreal, was 
recently issued, as covering oper- 
ations for 1920. Profits amounted 
to $279,562, as against $625,149 a 
year ago, and $1,310,597 two 
years ago. The surplus in 1920 
was $133,806, as against $314,069 
in 1919. Last year profits fell 
52.3 per cent from the previous 
year's high record total, and the 
1920 profits are 55.3 per cent 
lower than 1919. After all de- 
ductions net earnings on the 
common stock were $89,347, or 
equal to $1.06 on the 34,327 no- 
par-value common shares, against 
$442,069 in 1919, or equal to 27.63 
per cent on the 16,000 par value 
$100 shares then outstanding. 



Some people never crack any- 
not even a smile. 




VAN SLYKE BREAKING PLOW 

Latest improved 1921 model <20-in.). 
Also made as a horse plow. 

A Western Plow Built in\the West for thelWestern Farmer 

Strong and powerful, lots of clearance, easy draft, cutting an extremely 
flat unbroken furrow, completely buries any brush. Will do as good work 
in either brush or prairie. 

OVER 1,400 IN USE TO-DAY. ASK ANY USER. 



ATTRACTIVE PROPOSITION FOR AGENTS :: WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

THE EDMONTON IRON WORKS, Ltd. 

EDMONTON, ALTA. 



thing 



When writing advertisers mention "Canadian Farm 
Implements." 



.J 



LISTER SILOS Solve the Winter 
Feed Problem for the Farmer. 

With a sunflower crop and the Lister Silo, your customers are assured ample, 
palatable winter feed on which their stock thrives. Sleek, healthy cattle, better 
condition and bigger milk flow follow the use of a Lister Silo. Our stave Silos 
give long life and complete satisfaction — and a splendid margin of profit for the 
dealer. Staves are treated with damp-proof preservative. Roof and doors are 
air-tight. Self-supporting roof with ventilator and window; ^-inch hoops, with 
unbreakable malleable tighteners ; adjustable door clamps. 

No service required. The farmer can erect them. Handle Lister Silos. You make 
nice profit on every sale. Start a silo campaign in your district. Let us tell you 
about the Lister Silo. 





Cream 
Separators 

12 SIZES: CAPACITIES from 
280 to 1,300 Pounds ^ 



Now is the time to sell the Melotte. 
A size for every farm. Known 
everywhere for quality construction 
and close skimming. Immediate 
delivery of all sizes. The Melotte 
bowl is, self-balancing and friction- 
less; hangs free from a ball-bearing 
spindle. 

LITERATURE AND AGENCY 
OFFER SENT ON REQUEST 



THE COMPLETE LISTER LINE INCLUDES: 

"Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene Engines, Grain Grinders 
and Crushers, Electric Lighting Plants. "Melotte" and "Lister- 
Premier Cream Separators, Milking Machines, Ensilage Cutters, Silos 
Churns, Sawrag Outfits, Pumps, Pump Jacks, Pumping Outfits, etc. 
Ask for Catalogs. 




LISTER MILKING 
MACHINES--an Effec- 
tive Sales Producer for You 

They have been in use the world over for 
over 16 years, and our 1921 model is the last 
word in milker construction and efficiency. 

SIMPLE, SANITARY, TROUBLE-PROOF 

Made in single or double units. The Lister Pulsator gives 
perfect release of the teats. Cups can't fall off. Stroke of 
pulsator instantly adjustable to suit the individual cow. 
Operates with any 15^ H.P. engine or motor. An economical 
outfit for even- the farmer with a few cows. 



R. A. LISTER & CO. {Canada) LIMITED 

WINNIPEG TORONTO 




30 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



The Modern Tractor in the 
Orient 



Hiran> K. Moderwell, writing 
from Cairo, Egypt, says : 

If you want to know how the 
Egyptians plow their soil go to 
the tombs of the Pharaohs. 

Here, in pictures 
painted 5,030 years ago, 
you will see modern 
Egyptian agriculture in 
all its essentials, save 
for the irrigation. The 
plow, made of two 
sticks fas'tened to- 
gether, V shaped, and 
held so that the point 
pierces the ground, and 
this implement at- 
tached half way up to 
a long pole whose other 
end is fastened to a 
crosspiece and pulled 
by a yoke of oxen — . 
that is the plow of 
Egypt to-day, and it is 
all painted, in every de- 
tail, on the walls of the 
tombs. The harrow is 
there too, and it is 
equally primitive. Like- 
wise the winnowing 
with the bare feet and 
the- threshing with a 
rude roller. 

It has remained to 
North American man- 
ufacturers to introduce 
modern power farming 
equipment into the 
country and to teach 
the people to use it. 
The chief difficulty to 
be overcome is the atti- 
. tude of the Egyptian 
fellah who says, "What 
was good enough for 
my ancestors 5,000 
years ago is good 
enough for me. I know 
how to work this plow 
of mine, which has 
never failed my ances- 
tors and will never fail 
me. But this new 
fangled 'thing" — and 
then he shrugs his 
shoulders. Inshallah ! 

All the same the 
modern tractor sales- 
man has something to 
teach. The chief diffi- 
culty is that these new 
fangled machines be- 
have so queerly. Why 
must one have to know 
so much, says the fel- 
lah (peasant). 

But demonstrations 
given right before their 
own eyes, are gradually 
breaking 'their stone 
wall skepticism. • To 
bear out this statement, 
. we submit a few photo- 
graphs of Case tractors 
doing missionary work. 



The first picture shows ftie first 
tractor delivered in Damascus 
after being driven overland, a 
distance of about 78 miles. The 
machine arrived in perfect con- 
dition after having climbed two 
mountain ranges, each of 2,200 
feet elevation,, drawing the plow. 



At this demonstration, the Case 
15-27 and Grand Detour plow 
shown plowed a furrow 25, centi- 
meters deep (centimeter, .393 
inch), which is quite a record for 
depth for that territory. In the 
foreground of the bottom photo 
you will notice two pairs of cows 




plowing with the old fashioned 
stidk. They could just penetrate 
three centimeters. 

The next picture is a dealer's 
place of business, the offices of 
the African and Eastern Trading 
Corporation. Note on the right 
and left the ruins of buildings 
devastated by the war. 

This shows the way machinery 
is received at the docks at Bey- 
routh. The packing case at the 
right contains a 10-ton roller, the 
case at the left has within it a 
complete light weight Case 
thresher. On the 15-27 tractor is 
Derwiseh Ef¥endi El Ojlany, the 
first farmer to go in for power 
equipment in Syria. 

The last picture is probably the 
most interesting one of the four. 
It shows Le Pere Pierre Chaleb, 
chief of the Chatolipue Press, and 
chief of the Propaganda Depart- 
ment, operating a "plowing out- 
fit", very interested in the new 
era of mechanical traction. Local 
cultivators were much impressed 
with the demonstration and com- 
parison of plowing -methods. 
Many notables attended, some of 
whom are shown. 



A New Type of Tractor 
Demonstration 



Case Tractors Operating in Egypt and Syria 



To sell tractors this season the 
dealer must get out of the rut — 
must do things a little differently. 
New and unique methods of put- 
ting over the tractor idea are 
essential. Here's an instance of 
what one man did : 

H. J. Gretter, Hart-Parr dealer 
at Grandin, N.D., owns several 
farms in that territory. He has 
an established reputation for in- 
tegrity — has local confidence — a 
big factor in selling tractors. He 
used the Hart-Parr on his own 
farms, and he proved 'that con- 
fidence and service are the key- 
note to success in tractor busi- 
ness. 

Realizing this fact, Gretter 
called on several of his farmer 
owners near Grandin and sug- 
gested that th-ey all join him in a 
special Hart-Parr plowing dem- 
onstration; each farmer furnish- 
ing his own tractor and driving 
it himself. Every farmer invited 
agreed and Gretter selected trac- 
tors which had been in the hands 
of their owners for one, two and 
three years to demonstrate dura- 
bility and continuous service. 
He then advertised the demon- 
stration through his local papers 
and by hand bills over his terri- 
tory. A big crowd attended. 

Seven tractors owned by seven 
different farmers, each one driven 
by its farmer owner who donated 
his tractor and his own time in 
order to demonstrate to farmers 
of his neighborhood the advan- 
tage of power farming. 



May; 



1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



31 






ine 



Kerosene Tractor Oil 

A dark colored heavy-bodied oil suit- 
able for kerosene and gasoline tractor 
engines. It protects rubbing sur- 
faces from wear — reduces friction- 
maintains full compression. 

Imperial Polarine 
Kerosene Tractor Oil 
Extra Heavy 

A dark red-colored rich oil of extra 
heavy body — specially recom- 
mended for kerosene and gasolene 
tractor engines requiring an unusu- 
ally heavy oil. 

Imperial Polarine **A" 

A dark red-colored oil of extra heavy 
body for air-cooled or water-cooled 
gasolineorkerosene-burningengines. 
ELspecially suitable for kerosene 
tractors and for motor cycles. 




The Imperial Chart of Recom- 
mendations for ALL TYPES of 
tractors should be prominently 
displayed wherever Imperial 
Polarine is sold. Write to 56 
Church Street, Toronto, for 
Charts. 



Selling Tractors 

and Satisfaction 

Imperial Polarine Increases Owners' 
Satisfaction and Your Sales 



OU clinch every tractor sale you make when you 
supply the owner with the correct grade of Imperial 
Polarine. It insures complete satisfaction with 
his machine and builds goodwill which brings old cus- 
tomers back and creates new ones. 

Sell the new tractor owner correct lubrication with Im- 
perial Polarine at the same time you take his order for 
a tractor. Get out into the field after old customers, 
if necessary, and point out the advantage of using 
Imperial Polarine as recommended by our charts. 

Go after the oil business in your territory with Imperial 
Polarine and you will soon find that you're getting most 
of the tractor business, too. Continuous advertising 
helps you sell Imperial Polarine, and its uniform high 
quality and dependable service will keep users "sold" on it. 

Imperial Polarine is a big profit-maker for dealers. 
Ask the Imperial Oil salesman about our attractive 
dealer agreement and its advantages. 



IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED 

Power"Heat"Light"Lubrication 

BRANCHES IN ALL CITIES 



32 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Will Distribute Caswell Binder 
Hitches 



A. A. Maggard, sales manager 
of the Caswell Manufacturing 
Compan}-, Cherokee, Iowa, .spent 
a few days in Winnipeg during 
last month. Mr. Maggard com- 



pleted arrangements whereby D. 
Ackland & Son, Winnipeg, will 
distribute Caswell binder hitches 
in Western Canadian territory. 
The Winnipeg concern already 
have a good stock of hitches' on 
hand, both primary hitches and 
the tractor patterns for following. 



Mr. Maggard announces that 
the factory at Cherokee is very 
busy turning out their line. 
Nearly twenty thousand hitches 
are estimated as the 1921 output. 
He states that trade conditions in 
the United States show consider- 
able improvement. 



Special to Dealers! 




The DECKER LINE of THRESHERS 

A very attractive proposition for the asking. 
Make sure of your supply before the grain 
is ready to thresh. Special prices on carload 
lots. 

SIZES RANGING FROM 20x42 TO 28x46 

No other separator better adaipted for gas 
power, and consequently well suited to the 
individual farmer. A size of separator for every 
size of gas tractor. Heavy stock of all sizes 
carried in Winnipeg. 

Macdonald Thresher Co. Limited 



Head Office and Factory 
STRATFORD, ONTARIO 



p. O. BOX 8S2 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 




Fifty-Six Years of Seed Drill 
Production 



In the year that the Civil War 
closed the first Owatonna seeder 
was buil't by Louth & Howe, and 
its Avork at that early date in 
the seeding machine business was 
considered wonderful. Thirty 
years later, in 1895, 
the Owatonna grain 
drill was perfected, '\ 
quickly establish- 
ing an enviable rep- 
utation for light 
draft. This factor, 
year after year, has 
been a feature in 
Owatonna drills. 
The manufacturers The 
state 'that their aim 
has always been to produce 
drills that in addition to light 
draft would assure durability 
for the owner and the certainty 
of performance upon which to a 
great extent depends the result- 
ing crop. 

Modern farming in widely di- 
verse areas demands many differ- 
ent kinds of drills. Wha't suits 
one locality may not suit another. 



To meet the modern demand the 
New Owatonna Manufacturing 
Co., Owatonna, Minn., built dif- 
ferent styles of drills and seeders 
to meet every requirement in all 
ikinds of soil and under varying 
conditions. Drill development is 
an interesting side of implement 
production. From the old orig- 
inal force feed broadcast seeder 
with cultivator teeth has been de- 
veloped the hoe drill, shoe drill, 
the single disc and double disc 
drill, the press drill and many 
other designs. The Owatonna 
line comprises six-inch spread 
single disc, double disc, hoe and 
shoe drills, from 12 to 21 sizes. 




BELCHER 

TRACTOR HITCH 

THE SPRING DRAWBAR AT ALL 
TIMES CARRIES THE NORMAL LOAD 
of the Plows, or other hauled implements. 
When the Plows encounter any ■ load greater 
than that pre-determined by the Auxiliary 
Clutch Lever, the Spring closes sufficiently to 
tighten the chain, thus pulling back the 
Hook Crank, mounted on a Rocking Bar 
across the Tractor. This in turn shoves 
ahead the Upper Crank on Rocking Bar, which 
being connected with the Tractor Clutch Lever 
by an Auxiliary Lever working on a 
Quadrant, instantaneously disconnects the 
Clutcli, 

Stopping the Tractor but 
Not Uncoupling the Load. 



The driver, WITHOUT LEAVING HIS 
SEAT, can then relieve the tension on the 
spring by means of the Auxiliary Lever, 
which leaves his TRACTOR CLUTCH FREE, 
so that he may back Tractor in case Plows 
are caught in a rock or root, or go ahead in 
low if it is simply a short stretch of hard 
pulling, and as the HITCH IS ADJUSTABLE 
WHILE TRACTOR IS IN MOTION, the 
auxiliary lever can be again set to function 
with Tractor pulling in low, as it is the 
Spring Drawbar which always carries the 
load, either in high or low speed of the 
Tractor. 

The only tool needed to attach 
the Belcher Hitch to tractor is 
a wrench. 



v.. 



Write at 
Once to 



FRED. P. BELCHER, 



717 Grain 
Exchange, 



Winnipeg 



Owatonna 20-Run Grain Drill 

and seven-inch spread drills from 
10 to 18 discs or shoes. They also 
specialize in the production of 
law-down press drills in 12-7, 16-7 
and 20-6 single disc, double disc 
or shoe types. 

The feed mechanism in Owa- 
tonna drills, says the maufac- 
turers, is extremely simple, but 
gives easy, even and accurate re- 
sults with all kinds of drillable 
seed. In construction of these 
drills the frame, of tested angle 
steel, is under, not on, the axles, 
thus, it is claimed, placing the 
weight lower and making draft 
easier. Owatonna drills are inter- 
changeable. Either double disc 
bars, single disc bars, shoes or 
hoes can be attached to the same 
machine. Steel ribbon tubes 
carry the grain from feed to boot ; 
the hopper bottoms are of galvan- 
ized iron. In this drill disc ad- 
justment is provided so that the 
pitch of the disc can be changed 
to cut a wider or narrower fur- 
row merely by loosening a bolt 
and using corrugated notches 
which provide variation on the 
end of the drawbar and disc arm. 
The disc blades are of hammered 
saw blade steel, hand-straight- 
ened, bevelled and polished. 

On Owatonna drills the casting 
forming the ends of the seed box 
is also tthe hub on which 'the 
travelling wheel runs. There is a 
slight pitch so as to gather the 
travelling wheels (as in an auto- 
mobile) which assures light draft, 
according to the makers. - The 
drive is a simple chain of gears, 
the spindle driving by a square 
nut fitting into the outer end of 
the wheel hub. Some of the out- 
standing features claimed for 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



33 



this line of drills are ; Light 
weight and very light draft ; all 
weight is set low ; dust-proof 
disc bearings and balanced frame 
and hopper. Reinforced, non- 
sagging seed box and "gathered" 
wheels ; convenient levers, tilting 
steering tongue and tongue truck. 
Interchangeable design for four 
styles of drilling; patented de- 
tachable shoes, the entire shoe 
being removable by taking out 
one bolt. 

R. H. Procter, general sales 
manager of the company, who is 
at present investigating trade 
possibilities in the Canadian 
West, states that the factories at 
Owatonna are very busy turning 
out drills to meet 'the demand. 
The Owatonna power lift and 
power pressure device, says Mr. 
Procter, with five pressure ad- 
justments, has proven exception- 
ally popular with tractor farmers 
throughout the United States. 



tion. It forms a complete com- 
pact and handy reference for 'the 
dealer or distributor, listing all 
farm equipment manufacturers, 
their lines and the individual im- 
plements under their trade names. 
A tractor section includes com- 
plete specifications of all farm 
tractors, motor cultivators, 
threshers, power plows, etc., and 
an additional section has a full 
classification of tractor acces- 
sories. 

This valuable book is sold for 
$1.00, or in conjunction with 
Farm Machinery- Farm Power, 
for $1.50 per year. As a repair 
assistant it should be in large 
demand. 



Advance-Rumely Lower Prices 



The Tractor and Implement 
Blue Book 



We recently received the 1921 
issue of the Tractor and Imple- 
ment Blue Book, as published by 
Farm Machinery — Farm Power, 
St. Louis, Mo. This interesting 
publication improves annually 
and is up-to-date in every item. 
This is its 19th year of publica- 



Finley P. Mount, president of 
the Advance-Rumely Co., La 
Porte, Ind., announces the follow- 
ing: 

"The Steel Corporation has 
made a reduction in the price of 
steel. Concurrently with 'this 
announcement the Advance-Rum- 
ely Company announces a re- 
duction in the prices of all its 
products, these reductions aver- 
aging a little better than 15 per 
cent. Reductions in Oil Pull 
tractors, for instance, are as 
follows : 



Provincial Exhibition 

of Manitoba 

BRANDON, MAN. 
JULY 25 to 30-1921 

CANADA'S GREATEST FARM 
IMPLEMENT DISPLAY 

Affpntintl ^ Canadian and American Manufac- 
^ i.Ln^i±t±wii . turers of Tractors, Farm Implements, 
Farm Equipment, and all other lines 
of Manufacturers' Articles. 

This Exhibition annually has the largest and most comprehen- 
sive display of Farm Machinery and Implements shown at any 
similar event in Canada. We invite you to keep your lines before the 
Farmers and Implement Dealers of Western Canada. An exhibit at 
Brandon will be the best investment in sales-building at this time. 

lt*s Where the Manufacturer meets the Buyer 

Those who have exhibited Tractors, Farm Machinery, Lighting 
Plants, Automobiles and Farm Equipment at Brandon in the past 
have proven that IT PAYS. It's where you meet the buyer. 
Thousands of Farmers and Dealers inspect the exhibits. 

MAKE YOUR APPLICATION FOR SPACE EARLY 

Outside space in Machinery Section free; nominal charge for 
inside space. , 

FOR FULL PARTICULARS ADDRESS THE SECRETARY 
We invite you to Exhibit. 



WM. DOWLING, 

President 



W. I. SMALE, 
Sec'y and Manager 



12-20 Oil Pull reduced $300. 

16-30 Oil Pull reduced $380. 

20-40 Oil Pull reduced $575. 

30-60 Oil Pull reduced $685. 

"The reduction of steel prices 
cannot affect our present costs 
because our materials are all in 
our yards bought at the old 
prices. It does, however, estab- 
lish a lower replacement co.st 
and justifies us in immediately 
taking our lo.ss on the higher 
priced material on hand and with 
this loss written off we are able 
to establish our costs on a lower 
basis. 



"Our reduction is considerably 
greater than the reduction in 
steel prices, but we have in mind 
similar or even greater reductions 
made, or yet to be made, in 
other materials, besides reduction 
in wages already made in our 
shops. Moreover, we believe it 
sound business to get our prices 
down to a stable level for the 
remainder pf this year 'that our 
customers may have confidence in 
buying their seasonal require- 
ments without the fear of further 
decline in our prices during the 
vear." 



(ushman Binder Engines 



All Farm Work 



4H.P. 

Weight 
Only 
190 Lbs. 




Sales Points that Count 

TirHEREVER a Farm Engine is 
" wanted, you can sell him a 
Cushman. Show the farmer the 
principal sales and service points 
of the Cushman and you easily 
close a sale. They deliver more 
power per pound, and weigh only 
one-fourth to one-third as much 
as the ordinary farm engine. 
Unequalled for general farm use 
— and operate the binder during 
harvest. Econontical. Uniform 
speed and maximum power. 

Let's show you how you can put 
new life in your engine business. 

IT'S THE ORIGINAL 
BINDER ENGINE 

Schebler carburetor, throttling governor, 
friction clutch pulley, water circulating 
pump. Cushmans have the best mechan- 
ical finish of any engine sold. 

GET ONE ON YOUR FLOOR 



SNAP PRICES ON AUTO ACCESSORIES ! 

A line for which every car owner is a prospect. Special prices offered to 
clear stock on hand. Write for our quotations on Spark Plugs, for car or 
tractor; Sunderland Tire Pumps, Auto Jacks, etc. They'll sell on sight. 



You Can't Help Sell This Plow 
at its Pre-War Price and 
Attractive Terms 



" Lincoln " Tractor Gangs 
Two-Three Bottom Sizes 



With Rolling 
Coulter as 

Regular 
Equipment 




PHONE OR WIRE US 



If price is the debatable point, farmers won't hesitate to buy " Lincoln " Tractor 
Plows. We are quoting 1914 prices and very liberal terms. Note how lever action 
raises third bottom instantly, making a two-bottom outfit. Stubble or breaker 
bottoms. S€rongly built. Screw adjustment for depth. 

Don't delay. Oet in on this offer. Th6y won't last long at the price we quote. 

Price Means Business. Here's Your Opportunity. 

Cushman Motor Works of Canada, Limited 

Builders of light weiglit, tiigli grade Gasoline Engines for all Farm Power Work 

DEPT. C.F., WHYTE AVE. AND VINE ST. WINNIPEG, MAN. 



34 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Subscribers' 
Information Service 

Under this heading we will reply 
to enquiries from jobbers and 
dealers concerning the location of 
machine manufacturers, where re- 
pair parts may be obtained, etc. 
Endeavor always to give name of 
manufacturer. For immediate re- 
ply, enclose stamped, addressed 
envelope. Send enquiries to In- 
formation Department, CANADIAN 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, Winnipeg. 



J. M., Man. — Eepairs for a stationary 
engine manufactured by the Rock Island 
Plow Co. can be had from the Northern 
Rock Island Plow Co., Minneapolis. 
Their stationary engines are not sold 
in Canada. 

J. P. R., Man. — For particulars on corn 
planters, address the Massey-Harris 
Company, Winnipeg. 

A. G., Sask. — You can secure repairs 
for the Cletrac tractor from the Western 
head office, at 261 Fort St., Winnipeg. 

0. S., Man. — For details regarding the 
Scotch clipper type of plow, address the 
Massey-Harris Company, Toronto. 

C. P. Co., Man. — You can secure repairs 
for the Tiger grain drill from R. Wil- 
liams, Racine, Wis. This drill is now 
being manufactured by the Vim Tractor 




Come— Take a 
Fresh Grip 

America and the world now face sterner 
necessities of constructive effort in distribu- 
tion than in any previous period of business 
history. 

Marketing is in a state of flux. New ways 
are crowding out the old. Fresh ideas are 
replacing yesterday's customs. Plan and 
precision are triumphing over rule o' 
thumb. 

Jhe advertising prizes of a changing busi- 
ness day will gravitate to thinking, studious 
men. That is why men who sell things, 
and who make things which must be sold, 
plan to attend the Great Business Class 
Room of ig2i — the 

Seventeenth Annual Convention 
Associated Advertising Clubs 
of the World 
Atlanta, June 12-16 

There advertising men will take fresh grip 
on the business fundamentals — Faith, In- 
tegrity and Industry. They will exchange 
views, discuss ideas, inspire others, even 
while they themselves absorb inspiration. 
This advertising meeting promises worth- 
while values to serious-minded business 
men. They will tvum to it for guidance and 
counsel; they will find in it relaxation and 
fellowship. Join them in June. 

Exhibits of Domestic and Foreign 
Advertising, demonstrating the use 
of practically all recognized medi- 
ums, and arranged solely with a 
view to helping the convention 
delegate, will be a special feature. 
This alone makes the trip worth 
while. 

In June, Atlanta is at its best. High on a 
ridge between the Gulf and the Atlantic, 
fanned by cooling breezes and clad in gay 
summer attire, it is, as proved by United 
States Weather Bureau reports, a delightful 
place in June. 

For complete information as to railroad 
rates, hotel reservations, etc., please ad- 
dress the 

ASSOCIATED ADVERTISING CLUBS 

110 West 40th Street 
New York City 

Atlanta is famed for its hospitality 



Co., of Schleisingerville, Wis. Suitable 
repair parts for the Owens smut cleaner 
ehould be had from either the Cushman 
Motor Works of Canada, or the Twin 
City Separatoa- Co., both of Winnipeg. 

J. T. P., Alta. — The Saunders disc 
plow is mamifactured by the Newell- 
Saunders Plow Co., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
To obtain repairs promptly, address the 
Northern Rock Island Plow Co" 404 
Washington Ave. North, Minneapolis, 
Minn. The gang plow with rear wheel 
boK No. P 2667 is a Massey-Harris type. 
Address the nearest branch of the com- 
pany for part. 

v. Supply Co., Alta. — Cream separator- 
•with neck bearing No. 3413 is a Baltic 
M. I. separator as made by the Empire 
Cream Separator Co. You can obtain 
the part from Robinson -Alamo Ltd., 
Princess St., Winnipeg, who are Empire 
distributors. 

W. J. K., Sask. — It seems evident that 
the farmer is not using front wheel with 
bushing H 464 on the original plow, if 
all other parts are marked "W". A 
Moline plow has a front wheel bushing 
H S. 464. Top numbers on • the . same 
wheel would be H.S. 311 and H.S. 326. 
The letter W indicates an E-B plow, 
made by the Emerson-Brantingham Im- 
plement Co. They have a repair part 
H 464, but it is not a bushing. The 
South Bend aiilled Plow Works, South 
Bend, Ind., also»use the letter H on a 
gang plow. Can you supply further in- 
formation on this plow, so that we may 
investigate further? 

E. A., Alta.— Regarding enquiry in 
last issue for cultivator parts V-12 and 
V-26. These parts, we are informed by 
the Tudhope-Anderson Co., Orillia, Ont., 
are parts for a Sylvester cultivator man- 
ufactured by this concern. Repairs may 
be ha4 from tlie Winnipeg branch. 

J. T. W., Alta. — ^\^''e regret that we 
cannot locate the repair source for a disc 
harrow Avith parts V-23 and V-24. Is 
this a disc harrow or cultivator? Can 
any reader identify the make of the 
harrow? If a cultivator, it is a Sylves- 
ter, made by Tudhope-Anderson Co. 




OIL 
WAGON 
TANKS 

Make Money for 
Enterprising Dealers 



Write 



Western Steel 
Products Ltd. 

Winnipeg, Man. Regina, Sask 
Calgary, Alta. Edmonton, Alta. 



E. A. A,, Man.— Parts V-12 and .V-26 

are for a Sylvester cultivator made by 
the Tudhope-Anderson Oo. Address the 
Winnipeg oifice. 

G. V. D. B., Alta. — You can secure 
repair parts for the ignition system of 
an Ideal 3-h.p. engine from the manu- 
facturers, the Goold, Shapley & Muir 
Co., Regina. 

C. L. W., Man. — You can secure re- 
pairs for the Remy automobile ignition 
system from the Acme Magneto & Elec- 
trical Co., 148 Princess St., Winnipeg. 
If necessary they can overhaul the Remy 
systems to which you refer. 

W. M. L., Alta. — Repairs for the 
"Fish" wagon may be had from the 
Tudhope-Anderson Co. Address them at 
Regina. 

W. C. R., Alta.— Ratchet No. 4592B for 
land lever on three-bottom gang plow 
is for a plow made by the J. I. Case 
Plow Works, Racine, Wis. You can get 
this part from the Saskatoon branch 
of the Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co. 

F. R. M., Sask.— The "Oxford" gang 
plow was formerly manufactured by the 
Hillburn Mfg. Co., at Ayr, Ont., but is 
now obsolete. It is impossible to get 
shares for this plow, but if parts are 
needed there is a possibility that the 
Tudhope-Anderson Co., Orillia, Ont., can 
supply as they have a small repair stock 
on hand. You can get repairs for the 
"Bull" tractor from the Northern Im- 
plement Co., Water St., Winnipeg. 

W. J. F., Sask.— The "Iowa" cream 
separator is no longer handled in the 
Canadian West. For spare parts write 
the manufacturers direct — the Associated 
Manufacturers Co., Waterloo, Iowa. 

L. C. P., Minn.— The Stewart sheaf 
loader is handled in the United States 
by the Stewart Shock Loader Sales Go., 
Fargo, N.D. We have no reqord of a 
machine called the "Canadian" quack 
grass destroyer. An implement for this 
purpose is sold by the John Deere Plow 
Co. through their Minneapolis branch. 
A special quack grass harrow is also 
manufactured by the Weed Harvester 
Mfg. Co., at Belleville, Ont. 

D. M., Man.— You can secure heavy- 
duty Mosler spark plugs from D. Ack- 
land & Son Ltd., Winnipeg. 

R. C. S., Man.— Under the new license 
regulations in Manitoba the amount of 
tax is based on the horse power of the 
car. The rating is based on the formula 
of the National Automobile Chambers 
iQtf Commerce, which is as follows : Take 
the square of the bore of the cylinders, 
multiplv by the number of cylinders and 
divide "the result by 2.5. Example: 
Qtdinder bore, 3% inches; number of 
cylinders, 4; then, 31/8x31/2x4, divided 
li'y 2.5-, equals 35.6 h.p. 

A J. T., Man.— For particulars on auto 
trailers, address F. N. McDonald Co., 
156 Princess St., Winnipeg. 

D A., Man. — ^You can secure repairs 
for the P & O Little Genius gang plow 
from the nearest branch of the Inter- 
national Harvester Company. 

M. S., Man.— A power attachment tor 
a Hero No. 1 fanning mill may be had 
from the Twin City Separator Co., 
Winnipeg. ar^ 

S W., Man.— Repairs for the Dome 
cream separator can be had from Domo 
Separators Ltd., St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 

T. R., Sask.— Repairs for the "Farmer s 
Special" fanning mill may be had from 
the Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., 
Regina. 

S.A.E. Belt Speeds 

In a recenit bulletin the U. S. 
Society of Automotive Engineers 
recommends the adoption of the 
following belt speeds for station- 
ary engines for farm use: 

Nominal Belt speeds — 

engine rating Feet per 

h. p. minute ■ 

0 -1^ 600- 650 

lKr2^ 650- 750 

3 -4 800-1000 
5 -7 1500-1700 
7 -12 1700-2000 



The Remy High Tension 
Magneto 



The Remy Electric Co., Ander- 
son, Ind., has for over 20 years 
been well known as makers of 
electrical equipment for the auto- 
mobile. They now announce a 
new high tension magneto for 
tractors and 'trucks that will be 
of interest to the trade. This 
magneto embodies all the best 
features in design, especially not- 
iceable being the vertical distrib- 
utor mounting and compact im- 
pulse starter couplifig. 




The New Remy Magneto 

Recognizing the desirability of 
having the circuit breaker and 
distributor in the most accessable 
position possible, these units were 
placed vertically at the rear end 
of the magneto where the entire 
mechanism could be easily in-- 
spected by simply removing the 
distributor cap. The Remy Mag- 
neto is the only one on the market 
built this way. 

The impulse starter coupling is 
just as distinctive in -design as 
the rest of the job and has many 
advantages that, assures its re- 
liable and efficient operation. 

A more detailed description of 
this new magneto may be had 
by writing to the Remy Electric 
Company, of Anderson, Indiana, 
asking for their new magneto 
booklet. 



Samson Tractor Co. Appointing 
New Dealers 



C. E. M. Eastwood, Winnipeg, 
has been appointed traveller for 
the Samson Tractor Co. of Can- 
ada, and will cover Manitoba 
territory out of this city. The 
company report that they are 
appointing dealers throughout 
the territory, recent additions 
being: 

E. A. Stout, Gladstone; J. E. 
Rondan, Somerset; C. S. Jones, 
Roland; W. Travis, Winkler; C 
T. Loueven, Steinbach, and 
Brown & Linton, of Ochre River. 



Western Steel Expansion 

Western Steel Products Ltd., 
Winnipeg, have taken over two 
western firms. The Sheet Metal 
Manufacturing Co., of Calgary 
and Edmonton Metal Works Ltd., 
of Edmonton. 



May, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



The Same Good Twine in a New Big Ball 




Mccormick, deering 
international 



lUST as McCormick and Deering grain binders have 
been accepted as the world's standard — so McCor- 

mick and Deering and International brands of 

binder twine are acknowledged to be the world's best. 

This year the same good old twine is being turned out 
in a new and heavier ball. Six balls to the bale instead of 
ten; same amount of twine in a bale, occupying a third 
less space. This saves storage room for the dealer — almost 
twice as much twine in the new ball, which is practically the 
same size as the old one. Two balls fit any standard twine 
can and tie almost twice as many bundles. 



Saves Time 
when 
Time is Money 




These features are distinctly valuable to the big grain 
farmer. The new big ball saves time when time is money. 
The farmers will demand the new size. Can you supply the 
demand ? Write today or see the blockman. 



International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA tro 

HAMILTON CANADA 

WESTERN BRANCHES — BRANDON. Winnipeg. Man.. Calgary. Edmonton, lethbriogc. Alt*., 

ESTEVAN. N: BATTLEFORO. REGINA. SASKATOON. YOBKTON. SA5K. 

EASTERN BRANCHES — Hamilton. London. Ottawa. Ont, montreac Quebec. Que. St -John. N. 8. 



Prevents "Green^^ Straw Stacks 



"Save the Qrain" 




TKia trade-mark (In colors) is on each 
side of The Grain-Saving Wind Stack- 
er. It is the trade-mark that farmers and 
threshermen know as identifying The 
Grain - Saving Wind Stacker — the 
Stacker which puts the grain in the 
$ack and does not waste it in the straw 
stack. 



YOU HAVE SEEN many "green" straw stacks in your 
community — stacks sprouting w^asted grain. But have you 
ever stopped to consider that they represent wasted energy, 
wasted grain and wasted dollars. 

The farmer should get every dollar's worth from the grain crop 
which costs him so much time, labor and expense to produce. 
You can help him save it, if you make sure that the threshing 
machines you sell are equipped with THE GRAIN-SAVING 
WIND STACKER. This is the improved stacker, with the grain- 
saving trap, which leading manufacturers throughout North 
America have adopted to save the grain that threshing ma- 
chines otherwise waste, due to careless pitching, faulty adjust- 
ments, bad condition of grain, etc. 

Some manufacturers supply this Stacker exclusively. Others 
can supply it if you demand it and insist upon having it. Pro- 
tect 3^ur customers— always specify THE GRAIN-SAVING 
WIND STACKER, and accept no other. 

Farmers everywhere know THE GRAIN-SAVING WIND 
STACKER. Over three and one-half million farmers are 
reading about it this year through our advertising in 
twenty-nine leading farm papers. 

The Grain-Saving Wind Stacker originated -with 
The Indiana SSianufaHuring Company, Indianapolis, U. S. A. 



Oh 



e 





Wind 
lacker 



looking into hopper, showing 
grain crap near stacker fan; also 
auger runningfromundemeath 
trap for returning saved grain 
to separator. 



Canadian Farm Implements 



May, 1921 



Two Dozen Questions 

ti;r.tr "man. Know Thyself" 

Your 

Perfect Grade 

"""biSLsr^anT TcTOunS^ Vcry fcw of US — cspccially those who are making consistent efforts 

5— Is yoiir business growing? to be progressivc and systematic^ — Hke to hear from others of our 

^"E^el^yt'..^."^"^. deficiencies. But on the other hand, don't the most of us know 

5— Do you figure selling price il virf-nPcP 

so as in all cases to guar- all aUOUL OUr VircUeSr 

antee you a profit? 

5 — Can you , state definitely . . , 

what your overhead ex- Jt makcs 3. airterence too, who conducts the inquest. When we 

pense percentage amounts ^ 

\ ^ ^ back ourselves into a quiet corner and hold a post-mortem on 

5 — Have your sales reached a 

SvXed'^nseu^g?^'^^^^^^^ our failurcs we sometimes bring in a verdict of crimnal neghgence. 

3 — Do you know what lines nrU^ ^ 14- ^♦^U^«„ 

pay best and which pay 1 UC pOlUt IS we QO it— UOt Others, 

least? 

3 — Is your advertising cam- • • i r • i i r i 

paign carefully planned Criminal negliffcnce IS a nasty phrase, but most or us have at 

ahead and does it link t. & ^ x- 

f£i^paper"SSSSgSs? somc time or other applied it to ourselves when we discovered we 

^ advSedSoS?—^^ failed because of lack of observance of a simple well-known rule 

'~SLr'Z..^"'^.J'^. : of good business. If we had stopped to check up we would have 

3— Do you make special a\Tr^\Af-A r>nr f^rror 
effort to sell the more aVOlQeQ OUr Crror. 
profitable articles? 

6 — Do you turn stoek at least <<tt c ' ' J f l U» J l i 

four times a year. (Allow Houcst conicssion IS good lor thc soul auQ SO whcn wc and a 

1 for one turn; 2 for two 

eToT^itSnJS^L*"^'!'' couple of friends discovered that filling out this percentage table 

^~mtr!^r^nlj""'^^^ of cfflcicncy did US a lot of good, we decided to pass it on. 

5 — Do you buy from more 

sources than necessary? . .. , . . ^ ^ 

4— Are your windows regu- Advcrtising, aud co-opcration with It, accounts tor 15 per cent or 

larly and attractively xt i • • 

trimmed? storc succcss. Not Only your own advertising requires attention 

5— Do you give prompt ill r 1 i f i • i • 

courteous service? but a know ledge ot that great volume oi sales assistance reaching 

4 — Do you and your clerks , , , , . . , ^.^ 

study the merchandise you your customcrs through advcrtiscmcnts in 1 he JMor-lrest rarmer 

(Do you know how it is is also n^ccssary to any 100 per cent store in Western Canada. 

made and the best talkmg 
points?) 

3 — Do you make use of the 

7^S&TcZUl"o^r Keep tab on the best sellers by reading 

3-DoTou belong ■to'a D.ai: Tke Nor'-West Farmer 
ers'A^ociation?..,. . $1.00 per vear 

6 — Do you attend the ^ 
meetings 

(AUow 6 for any one 

association meeting regu- _ . m 

larly attended?) ^"I^l m, ■ mM# ^ 

3— Do you read good trade I |%^^^ l%l W^Sv^mC^^T 

iournak? J| IIC I.^ Vi ^WW^SMV 

2 — Have you a good maihng ^^m^ 

list? ^^^^ ^ 

3- Do you The Pioneer^ ^ U #^ 

'-^y^^tw^orrr^^^ ^'^^e^'^cZ^ I Ca 1^111^1' 

store? ■ 

100% Total Total Grade FARM SALES SERVICE 

We are indebted to Printers' Ink for WINNIPEG 



VOL. XVII., No. 6 


WINNIPEG, CANADA, JUNE, 1921 


BCTBSCKIPTION PRICK IN CANADa|p" }q' 





National Importance 

of the Farmer 

"While the farmer's place in the community has 
always been important, all classes now recognize, as 
never before, that the national welfare depends on 
increased agricultural production." 

Manning W. Doherty 

Ontario Minister of Agriculture 

As the pioneer Bank of Western Canada we 
are bankers for the United Grain Growers, 
the United Farmers of Alberta and the Sas- 
katchewan Co-Operative Elevator Company. 454 

UNION BANK OF CANADA 

Head Office : : WINNIPEG 



Economy— CA\° Reliability- 

You lower your Fire Insur- \ We have paid this annual 

ance on Store and Home. 0\ dividend since 1908. 

Why not get your Fire Insurance at cost ? Reduce your overhead 
by a direct 50% saving of the premium paid. Absolute safety. Divi- 
dends paid annually at expiration of policy. Write to-day. 

The Canadian Hardware and 
Implement Underwriters 

C. L. CLARK, MANAGER 

802 Confederation Life Bldg., Winnipeg 

(Operating in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario) 

PROVINCIAL AGENTS WILL CALL AT YOUR REQUEST. 
mStTRANCE IN FOBCE OVER $375,000,000:00 

NET CASH SURPLUS ....... OVER $ 1,900,000.00 

DEPOSITED WITH DOMINION OF CANADA « 160,000.00 

REFERENCEi BANK OF MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 



Watson's "Excelsior" Power Blower 
Feed Cutters are Fast Workers 

Handles 6 tons per hour. Equipped with travelling feed 
table. Has 13-inch throat. Length of cut ^ to 1 inchy or 
with extra gears, IVi to VA inches. Heavy, balanced, knife 
wheel. Large feed box and well fitted feed rollers. One 

lever starts, stops and 
reverses. Knives and 
gearing fully enclosed. 
Special English steel 
knives. Get full par- 
ticulars of these machines. 

Watson'sFeed 
Cutters are made 
in 7 types. We 
can now supply 
all styles from 
stock. Ask for 
folder and price. 




Repairs for Moline Implements 

Moline Plows — Moline Disk Harrows — Mandt Wagoas and Farm Trucks — 
National and Mandt Manure Spreaders — Monitor Drills — Moline Engine 
Gangs — Adriance Binders, Mowers and Rakes. 

Genuine Moline 
" ACME " Shares 

The original soft centre 
share. Give perfect 
wear. Order your 
stock now. 

Also Repairs For 

Janesville Plows, 
Disc Harrows, etc. 



SEND us YOUR 
REPAIR ORDERS 




311 CHAMBERS ST., WINNIPEG, Man. 



FITTED PLOW SHARES 




Share* Stocked at Regina for every make of Plow 

PLACE YOUR ORDER TO-DAY 

HARROW TEETH — CUTIVATORS — PAINTED AND VARNISHED 
EVENER WOODS PLOW HITCHES WAGON SETS 

CHRISTIANSEN IMPLEMENTS 
Land Packers, Mulchers, and Plow Harrows 
The House of Quality We Ship Daily 

Write for Latest Catalogue 

Western Implements Limited 

Cor. 6th & Scarth St. Regina, Sask. 



SEND A POSTAL 



for a copy of The Great- West Report for 1920. 

Prudent men see the necessity for Life Insurance. And they 
see the need for choosing that insurance with the utmost care. 

Your choice will be simplified by reading the above Report. 
No clearer proof could be given of the value of The Great- West 
Policies. 

For the fourteenth successive year the Company stands first 
for Canadian Business — showing the wide approval of the Great- 
West Policies. High interest earnings, low expense rates and a 
favorable mortaUty continue to be outstanding features — and 
lead to high returns to Policyholders. 

The GREAT-WEST LIFE ASSURANCE Co. 

Dept. "P. 16" 
Head Office : : WINNIPEG 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 




The Same Old 
Ravenous Binders 

will demand their thousands of miles of PLYM- 
OUTH Twine this summer. 

The same strong, clean-running twine that the 

Plymouth Cordage Company has been mak- 
ing for forty years. Twine so balled that it won't 
collapse or snarl in the machine, and twine that 
is free from knots and always full length. 

Plymouth Twine is the kind that farmers have 
learned to buy, because they know that no mat- 
ter how small their needs, nor from whom they 
buy, it is always the same high quality. 

Why not sign your season's contract now? 




\ 





Plymouth Cordage Co. 

Welland, Canada 

Canadian Distributing Agencies 

W. G. McMahon Hobbs Hdw. Co., Ltd. 

(Representing Lindsay Bros. ) Toronto, Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man. 




PLYMOUTH TWINE 



5-42 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



3 




In The Heat of Mid-Summer 



B 



ETWEEN the season of heavy spring work and threshing time, when the 
farmer is chiefly interested in haying and harvesting, an excellent oppor- 
tunity exists for selling Case Kerosene Tractors. 

Equipped with the Case Extension Tractor Control, which can be attached easily 
to any Case 10-18 or 15-27 tractor, the farmer can drive either one of these 
machines from the seat of his mower or binder. This attachment does away with 
the necessity for an extra man when horses are displaced by tractor power on 
such work. With a Case Tractor it is possible to pull two or more mowers or 
binders at a time. The hottest weather does not affect the efficient, economical 
operation of Case Kerosene Tractors. 

Show your customers how it is possible to speed up haying and harvest 
witii tlie aid of a Case Tractor — get the hay cut, cured and under cover, 
and the grain harvested while the crop is right and the weather favorable. 
Every farmer knows the possible crop disaster that lurks in delay. 

Aside from haying and harvest, there is always the horse-killing job of summer- 
fallowing waiting to be shouldered by Case Tractors, and such other tasks as field 
cultivating, in localities where it is practised, discing, and road work. Make 
the most of the opportunities for mid-summer sales of Case Tractors. 

J. 1. Case Threshing Machine Company 

Dept. F216 Racine, » Wisconsin 




Factory Branches 

Alia., Calgary — Edmonton 
Sask., ReginaSaskatoon 
Man., Winnipeg — Brandon 
Ont., Toronto 




KEROSENE 



TRACTORS 



Factory Branches 
Alta., Calgary — Edmonton 
Satk., Regina — Saskatoon 
Man., Winnipeg — Brandon 
Ont., Toronto 




4 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



FROST 81 WOOD 

MOWERS AND RAKES 



Your customers realize that it pays to have efficient and 
dependable machinery at haying time. They know that delays 
at this season are expensive in time and crop. With these - 
Frbst & Wood Machines on your floor you'll be able to secure 
a good share of the Mower and Rake business this season, 

F. & W. MOWERS 

Are light draft machines because all working parts are fitted with generous 
size Roller Bearings. 

They're simple and easily operated, yet sufficiently strong for the toughest 
propositions they can be put up against. 

One of their best features is the quick-acting, INTERNAL GEAR arrange- 
ment of the driving mechanism. No "flying start" required. The machine 
begins cutting at the first forward motion of the horses. 





F. & W. RAKES 

Built on strong, angle steel frames. Parts are rivetted — not bolted — so can- 
not shake off. 

Teeth are special high-grade spring steel. Every tooth is carefully tempered 
and tested before leaving factory. 

Automatic Dump acts instantly and raises teeth so they have high 
clearance. 

Made of steel throughout, they are very durable and give many years of 
satisfactory service. 

Ask our nearest branch house for supplies 
of literature descriptive of these and other 
Cockshutt— Frost & Wood Implements 

Cockshutt Plow Co. Limited 

Winnipeg Regina Saskatoon ' Calgary Edmonton 



SAWYER-MASSEY CO. 

Tractors : Threshers : Road Machinery 



Sawyer-Massey Sales Success 




The success of dealers handling the Sawyer- 
Massey Line hinges upon distinct selling fea- 
tures. These are utility, economy and 
freedom from trouble, excellence of de- 
sign and construction and wonderful 
durability. The farmer realizes that 
Sawyer-Massey goods mean maximum 
returns from his investment. 




SAWYER-MASSEY 11-22 H.P. 



The farmer who owns a Sawyer-Massey Tractor increases his yields without extra costs. 
He takes care of his field and belt work better and faster. Sawyer-Massey ownership is real 
economy. 



Sawyer-Massey Threshers 

Have proven their efficiency in the field. They get all the grain, solve threshing 
problems and are the most reliable outfits you can sell the tractor owner. Sell them 
and help your customers get every dollar possible from their 1921 crop. - 

For Catalogs and Agency Proposition, address: 

Sawyer-Massey Company Limited 

Head Office and Factories: Hamilton, Ont. 

WINNIPEG REGINA SASKATOON 

CALGARY EDMONTON 



Wallis 
Tractors 

Offer the farmer adequate 
and economical power. 
They develop great draw- 
bar pull in relation to 
weight. Complete infor- 
mation on request. 




THE WALLIS TRACTOR 15-25 H.P. 



Vol. XVII., No. 6 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, JUNE, 1921 



i Per Yfiftr 

Subscription Price in Canada \ p^, 



Per Year. Jl.OO 
10c 



Oil: The Greatest Factor in Industry and Agriculture 



T ain tile giant who lives in the bowels 
of the eaith — the greatest power in the 
world today. Were I to die tonight, 
every activitj' of industry, commerce, 
traffic and pleasure would have to cease 
running. Every day man finds new ways 
to use me. I serve him in commerce, 
agriculture, transportation, pleasure, 
sickness, in life and death. 

Man called me Petroleum because he 
found me in the heart of the rocks. To 
the masses I bear a shorter, easier name. 
They call me OIL, and this is tlie OIL 
Age. 

They are drilling for me in the frozen 
Northland and under the blazing tropic 
sun. There is hardly a quarter of the 
globe where I haven't been discovered. 
After I was released ifrom my prison 
cell man mated me with Chemistry and 
my ichildren are numerous as the hills. 

Factories couldn't run without our 
lubricants, and trains, steamships, mo- 
tor cars, motor trucks, tractors, air- 
planes, motor boats, trolleys, wagons, 
motor-cycles — every piece of moving 
machinery on earth needs us, some in 
greater, some in lesser degree, but all 
need us. 

I am the life of industry. I am the 
soul olf power — the mightiest power on 
earth. I am Speed. I am Light. I am 
Lubrication and Silence, I am Efficiency, 
I am Economy, I am Safety, I am Suc- 
cess, I am Life-saving, for you could 
not live without me. 

Petroleum, crude oil, is a complex 
substance. Basically all crude oil con- 
tains the same elements. Basically it 
analyzes about the same everywhere. 
But its combinations of elements and 
their varying proportions make of every 
distillation a difTereiirt problem. 

From practically all crude oil the same 
elements are distilled. These magic 
products, gasoline, kerosene, fuel oils, 
lubricating oils, paraffin wax and coke, 
are extracted, in greater or lesser pro- 
portion, from practically all crude oils. 
How Oil is Refined 

A refinery, such as those operated by 
Canadian oil companies, has its pipe 
lines to the producing oil fields. When 
a new well is brought in, a pipe line is 
laid to the well. The oil produced is 
collected in storage tanks. These are 
connected with the company's pipe line. 
When the storage tanks are ifull, the 
refinery pipe line draws off that oil to 
its central gathering oil farm — a tract 
of land equipped with massive oil tanks. 
These storage tanks are usually 55,000 
barrel capacity. 

There are three principal types of re- 
fineries. The simplest type is what is 
known to the trade as topping or skin- 
ning plant and is used for removing the 
light hydrocarbons, such as gasoline and 
kerosene, from petroleum, and selling 
the remainder as fuel oil. 

The next type of a refinery is what is 
known as a Tubrication plant. A lubri- 
cating plant stai'ts off, in principle, sim- 
ilar to a topping plant, but carries the 
process further and cuts down into some 
Olf the lubricating oil, removing all of 
the gasoline and kerosene and some lu- 
bricating oils, selling the remainder as 
fuel oil. 

The next type is what is known as 
the complete refinery. A complete re- 
finery again starts off similar to a top- 



ping plant and works up all the crude 
into gasoline, kerosene, light and heavy 
lubricating oils, wax, coke and other by- 
products. 

The big modern refineries, such as 
those operated by Canadian Oil Com- 
panies at Petrolia, Ontario, combine all 
three plants in one, producing only the 
highest quality of each type of gasoline 
and oil. 

Refining gasoline from crude oil is a 
separation process and can be likened to 
tiie process of skimming ci-eam from 
milk. 

Gasoline is the first thing that comes 
from crude oil in the refining process. 
A gasoline that is dry, volatile and 
homogeneous. On this account it starts 
quickly in the motor. 

When you use a low-grade gasoline in 
your automobile, here's what happens: 
When your car stands over night, or 
any length of time, coal oil being heav- 
ier than gasoline, the coal oil goes to 
the bottom oif your carburetor and the 
gasoline stays on top. This is especially 
noticeable in cold weather. 

Oil scientifically refined starts easily 
at all times ; it can be likened to the 
"cream" of crude oil. It is a gasoline 
famous for its volatile homogeneous and 
luiiform high quality, quick starting, 
smooth acceleration, full power and long 
mileage. 

Treating the Crude Oil 

Crude methods of distillation, what 
we may call average methods, fail to 
separate the elements thoroughly. In 
distilling the gasoline many refineries 
carry over into it a share af kerosene, 
a little gas oil, some wax, even some af 
the heavier oils. This improperly re- 
fined gasoline gives trouble in your mo- 
tor. It is the cause of carbon deposit 
on your cylinders. It acts queerly in 
very cold or very hot weather, or very 
dry weather, because of improper meth- 
ods of distillation. 

To produce a gasoline that is 100 per 
cent right requires the most careful and 
painstaking distillation. It is a work 
of infinite detail. 

The crude oil is pumped from the 
storage tanks into great crude oil Stills 
that look like gigantic boilers. Those 
tanks, set on masonry, are over a great 
furnace fed by oil, natural gas or coal. 



The stills are filled nearly ifull of crude 
oil and tlie heat is applied. 

The elements of icrude oil are all 
blended in the crude. The only method 
of determining when the oil changes 
character from gasoline to kerosene, and 
then to gas oil, wax oil, etc., is by test- 
ing it, not once in a while, but con- 
stantly. The various elements vaporize 
at different temperatures. As the oil 
becomes heated the gasoline element 
which vaporizes at the lowest tempera- 
ture begins to form bubbles like you see 
in water beginning to boil. 

These bubbles form on the bottom 
plate nearest the fire, but eventually 
rise to the surface. As each little bub- 
ble comes to the surface it explodes, 
releasing the vapor, or gas generated 
by heat. 

To help activate the action of the 
development of this gas the bottom of 
the still has a net-work of steam pipes 
through which live steam is driven into 
the mass of crude oil. This helps break 
a way through the heavy crude oil for 
the gasoline vapor bubbles, and helps 
drive it out of the still. It also agitates 
the mass of heavy crude oil. 

When the top of the still is full of 
this vapor it 'forces its way out through 
the outlet pipes into the condenser. The 
condenser is composed of a series of con- 
tinuous pipes, laid in orderly rows and 
immersed in cold water. Tbe vapor 
rises from the still and runs into these 
condenser pipes, where cold water con- 
denses it into liquid gasoline. 

The gasoline runs out of the con- 
denser pipes into the tailing house. 
Here it is tested. The character of the 
gasoline is determined by Beaume tests. 
These tests are taken every little while. 
Here occurs an automatic separation of 
the gasoline from the steam used as a 
vehicle to carry the vapor out. of the 
still. The gasoline is then piped out 
into a receiving tank while the water 
runs off into water storage ponds. 

On the front of the stills are thermo- 
meters which show the temperature of 
the crude oil in the still. Here, too, 
tests are made. A slight quantity of 
the oil in process of distillation is 
drawn off and is tested. In this way a 
double check is obtained on what is go- 
ing on in the still. 



|IL IS THE greatest power in the world to- 
day. It places at the command of man 
power and energy that for years has lain 
dormant hundreds, yes, thousands of feet deep 
in the bowels of the earth. 



Industry, Commerce and Agriculture depend 
upon it; from factory to field the development 
of farm machinery has depended upon Oil. 
Stationary engine, car, truck and tractor are its 
servants. Just as the world had a Stone Age, a 
Coal Age, an Iron Age now we live in an Oil Age. 



When the test of the gas oil has 
reached a certain specific degree, then 
its flow into the receiving tank is shut 
oft' and the wax oil is drawn off into 
another receiving tank. All the previ- 
ous distillates have been white liquids. 

The wax oil is a yellowish white. The 
heavier contents of the crude oil are 
being liberated by the heat, which has 
now brought the crude oil contents to 
a high degree of temperature. 

How Gasoline is Refined 

Let us take the contents of the gaso- 
line tank now and follow it through its 
processes of perfecting. 

The gasoline in the receiving tank is 
now pumped into what is called an agi- 
tator. This is a tall, towerlike struc- 
ture of steel, resting on a base of either 
steel or concrete. If you look into the 
base you will see a funnel-like, down- 
pointing cone, the full size of the tower. 
In these agitators the gasoline is washed, 
cleansed and filtered ifor impurities. 
When the process is complete, and this 
means many more tests, the gasoline is 
then pumped into a steam still. The 
steam heats the gasoline slowly and 
develops the vapor more slowly and 
evenly. Here the checking tests are 
made even more rigorously. 

In this redistillation the greater vol- 
ume distilled is gasoline, but a certain 
amount of kerosene is also recovered, 
and even a degree of gas oil, wax oil 
and residue. They are the particles car- 
ried over in the vapor bubbles and on 
the steam in the crude oil still. 

Testing the Flash-Point 

The processes of distilling kerosene 
are somewhat similar. The same care 
in watching its gravity, the same care 
in washing and filtration are used; the 
same redistillations are made. If kero- 
sene is not pure it cakes on the wick of 
the burner and smokes. If it does not 
come to certain tests it does not ignite 
easily enough and it must not contain 
gasoline or it will ignite too readily 
and be dangerous when used in lamps, 
stoves, etc. 

Besides all the gravity tests to which 
gasoline is subjected we make a flash 
and fire test on kerosene. The kerosene 
is heated on a special testing apparatus. 
This has a thermometer immersed in the 
kerosene which shows accurately its 
temperature. When the temperature of 
the kerosene reaches a certain figure it 
is tested with a little flame thrower 
which is swept over the surface. If it 
ignites there is a trace of gasoline in it 
and the batch has to be redistilled. If 
it does not flash then the temperature 
is raised gradually, making tests every 
few seconds until the proper tempera- 
ture is reached, when it should flash. 
Developing Lubricants 

Wax oil freed from the wax is dis- 
tilled and proc-essed into the ditt'erent 
types of lubricants. These run in den- 
sities and consistencies from the highly 
fluid fine lubricants, used in delicate 
machinery, through various grades of 
consistency, to the heaviest cylinder oils 
"that are as thick as lard, the kind of 
oils that are used in gear boxes, trans- 
missions, etc. 

Vou have probably noticed how oils 
of different characters vary in color. 
The oil is not colored artificially. It 
develops its own individual color in the 
processes of distillation and manufac- 



6 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



turing. Tlie oils iiui from a light palern»f» Glasses, tinted to a certain color, are age of which will also be pub- 

lished. A plan similar to the 
one adopted for tractor records 
will be used for horse records. 
Those teams which fail to qualify 
under the rules will be grouped 



lemon yellow througli graduations of 
orange, red, magenta and brown to a 
dark, greenish tinge aiid a deep brown 
almost black. 

In addition to the various tests men- 
tioned lubricating oils are submitted to 
fire and flash tests. These are highly 
important. Dealers must remember, 
for instance, that the cjdinder oils that 
are used in a car have to stand terrific 
high temperatures. In an auto cylinder, 
during explosion of the charge, the tem- 
perature may be 3,000 deg. F. 

This is the heat flash which oil must 
withstand. In order to make a lubri- 
cating oil that will stand such terrific 
heat it is very necessary that it should 
be able to withstand the severest ' flash 
and fire tests. 

The Viscosity Test 
A receptacle is filled with the lubricat- 
ing oil to be tested. This receptacle 
stands in a water bath. This water 
bath is raised to a determined tempera- 
ture. With it the temperature of the 
oil under test is also raised to that de- 
sired' temperature. Both water bath 
and oil are constantly tested for tem- 
peratures. When both reach the desired 
temperatures the oil is released through 
an opening and a stop watch started. 
In order to qualify for a certain quality 
it must have a certain viscosity test, 
which is its ability to flow. It must 
flow out of that receptacle in a certain 
specified number of seconds. The time 
is taken accurately, to the split second. 
It must not vary if rem the degree es- 
tablished'. 

If it does not show the right viscosity, 
that is to say, if it does not flow out 
of the measured receptacle in a certain 
specific number of seconds, then it is 
returned to be worked over until it is 
right. 



used in this test. A slide of the glass 
is inserted into a little box like a kodak 
camera. On the other side is a glass 
receptacle to bold the oil. By an ad- 
justment of angles the light projected 
through the glass and the oil is mir- 
rored on two halves of a reflector. One 
half of the circle is the color oif the 
test glass, the other half is the color 
reflected through the oil. These two 
colors must be absolutely identical. 
They must not vary by the fraction of 
the slightest shade. 

As in the blending of one color of the 
spectrum, or rainbow, into another color 
the colors seem to fade into each other, 
so in refining oil the one product shades 
almost impalpably into another, yet 
commercially each product must be ab- 
solutely isolated. There must be no 
kerosene in the gasoline and no gasoline 
in the kerosene. There must be no 
kerosene in gas oil and no gasoline. 
The kerosene and gas oil must be ex- 
tracted entirely from the lubricating 
oils OfUd the waxes and there must be 
no wax in the gas oil or the kerosene or 
gasoline. 

Testing Determines Quality 
The thousands of tests a year made 
in refining petroleum products are the 
secret of success in making better pro- 
duets. The tests never cease. The first 
test is made at the well. The last test 
is made in the tank ear which carries 
the products to market. These tests 
are made at the loading racks and are 
tlie most careful and scrutinizing tests 
of all, all being laboratory tests made 
by our most expert chemists. And if 
the loaded tank car doesn't qualify to 
the scruple of a degree ai our exacting 
requirements the car is pumped out and 
contents are refined over to bring them 
up to specifications. 



together and their average 
secured. 



Three Tractor Demonstrations for U.S. in 1921 



The National Show and Dem- 
onstration Committee of the U.S. 
National Implement & Vehicle 
Association has decided to hold 
three demonstrations this year, 
the first to be at Fargo, N.D., 
June 28, 29, and 30. Another 
demonstration will be held in 
the southwest, and the third in 
the central-west. Time and loca- 
tion will be decided later. .Two 
shows are also authorized — one 
for Minneapolis and one for Kan- 
sas City. 

A Comparison in Efficiency 
Provision has been made at 
the tractor demonstrations for 
contests between horses and trac- 
tors in field operations. The 
records will be taken by a com- 
mittee composed of representa- 
tives from the American Society 
of Agricultural Engineers, from 
the state university, either of the 
state where the demonstration is 
held or the university . of any 
other state ; from tractor manu- 
facturers, from the Society of 
Automotive Engineers, from the 
Horse Association of America, 
and from the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture. 

Substantial prizes will be 
ofifered for the best work done by 
the horse-drawn implements in 
plowing and seed bed prepara- 
tions. First prize will be $400; 
second prize, $300 ; third prize, 
$200; fourth prize, $100; fifth 
prize, $50. 



Each tractor or horse-drawn 
outfit will be assigned a definite 
number of acres based on the 
number of bottoms. Plots will 
be drawn by lot but horses and 
tractors will be located in sep- 
arate groups. It is not 'the pur- 
pose to put horses in, competition 
with tractors, but to put the 
various horse outfits in com- 
petition with each other. 

No individual irecords of 'tractor 
performance and no comparisons 
between individual tractors will 
be given out for publication by 
the committee in charge of the 
demonstration. Each tractor 
manufacturer, however, will be 
provided with the record of his 
own machines. The only results 
made public will be averages. 

Rules will be made to cover 
such details as depth of plowing, 
speed, etc. Observers will watch 
the operations and note the per- 
formance of each tractor and 
averages will be secured from 
those qualifying under the rules. 
Finally the average of the best 
six tractor records will be taken 
from those qualifying. Those 
tractors which do not fulfill the. 
conditions will constitute one 
class for which averages will be 
made. Those fulfilling the condi- 
tions will constitute another class 
and their averages will be pub- 
lished. 

Of these the six highest will 
constitute a third class, the aver- 



Tractor Lubrication is an 
Important Feature 



The great importance of con- 
tinuous and sufficient lubrication 
for all traqtor e;ngine parts can- 
not be too fully recognized or 
too carefully looked after by the 
operator to avoid wear and heavy 
repair bills. 

Compared to the relatively light 
load carried by the average auto- 
mobile engine, the tractor engine 
is always working at nearly full 
power delivery and wide open 
throttle. It must pull a dead load 
all day long with no periods of 
recuperation such as "coasting" 
down hills or idling at the curb. 

As a result of high, full-load 
explosion pressures and tempera- 
tures, the mean operating tem- 
peratures of tractor engines are 
higher than those in automobile 
engines and a heavier oil must be 
employed ito secure reasonable 
economy and satisfactory service. 

Probably the most unfavorable 
condition attending tractor en- 
gine operation is that caused by 
the dusty atmosphere about the 
machine. This air, heavily laden 
with dus|t, is drawn through the 
carburetor into the engine cylin- 
ders. There the dust falls upon 
the piston heads and collects on 
the cylinder surfaces, building up 
a mass of dust and carbon deposit 
upon the explosion chamber walls. 
Gradually working down between 
the pistons and the cylinder walls, 
dust soon comple/tes its destruc- 
tive, effects by wearing out the 
piston rings, pistons, cylinders 
and bearings. Dust filled oil, and 
metal worn from the parts above, 
drip into the crankcase, contam- 
inating the oil supply there and 
rendering it unfiit for use. All 
farm tractors, whether they be of 
the best or of the poorest design, 
are subject to the dust evil. 

Inlet air, passing through the 
carburetor into ,the engine, must 
first be sent throiigh a positive, 
dust separator, otherwise long 
life of working parts and efficient 
lubrication cannot be obtained, 
even with the best of oils. 

The principal methods em- 
ployed for dust separation consist 
of (1) scrubbing the air with 
water, (2) passing it through 
eiderdown or other suitable cloth, 
or (3) through a centrifugal 
separator. The scrubbing pro- 
cess has the disadvantage of re- 
quiring large volumes of water 



which must be carried on the 
tractor. Straining the air through 
cloth allows the passage of some 
dust. The pores of the cloth 
eventually clog up, making fre- 
quent replacement or washing 
necessary. The centrifugal separ- 
ator offers advantages over the 
other two methods. 

Another source of trouble lies 
in leakage from crankcases. 
Many tractor engines, unfortun- 
ately, allow several times the 
quantity of oil actually needed 
for their perfect lubrication to 
leak out continuously. Such oil 
waste is a money loss to the 
owner so long as it serves him no 
useful purpose. In this connec- 
tion, it is self-evident that a single 
drop, applied in the right place 
and at the right time, has more 
lubricating value than barrels of 
oil sprinkled over the surface of 
plow fields. Inexpensive paper 
or fibre gaskets, properly applied 
to crankcase seams with shellac, 
will entirely suppress leakage. . If 
oil also leaks out along the crank- 
shaft or other shafts in ,the crank- 
case, centrifugal thrower rings 
should be applied to them. 

Considerable engine trouble is 
experienced on engines carrying 
the supply of oil in the crankcase, 
due to the fact that particles of 
kerosene will work past the pis- 
iton and get into the oil, which 
thins it and makes the lubrication 
inadequate. This is especially 
true when the engine is being 
used in cold weather when there 
is more tendency for the cylinders 
to miss explosions. This is also 
true of gasoline burning engines, 
due to the poor quality of gaso- 
line. In some cases particles of 
water will be found in /the crank- 
case, Avhich in cold weather often 
causes the oil circulating pump to 
become inoperative due to its 
being frozen. The oil circulating 
gauge should be watched care- 
fully each time after starting an 
engine in cold weather. In case 
the oil is found to contain much 
kerosene or water, it is economy 
to completely drain the oil and 
refill with new oil. 

For the lubrication of enclosed 
chains, bevel or spur gears, the 
use of a heavy transmission oil or 
gear compound is recommended. 
For exposed chains or gears, 
transmission oil should be fed 
upon their contact surfaces, pre- 
ferably by a mechanical oil pump, 
through an adjustable feed. This 
oil pump should be geared to 
some transmission shaft which 
turns at a speed proportional to 
the motion of advancement of the 
tractor. 



The merchant who lies about 
his goods in print has no business 
being in business. 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



7 




$90,000 Worth of 
Rumely Sales Last Year 

Concentrating his efforts on the Advance- 
Rumely line exclusively, J. O. Frish, Fond 
du Lac, Wis., has developed a greater an- 
nual volume of Rumely sales than any other 
dealer who operates under the jurisdiction of 
the Advance-Rumely Madison, Wis., branch. 

For seven years he has maintained the 
policy of centering his entire sales efforts on 
the Advance-Rumely line in preference to 
handling the goods of a number of manu- 
facturers. 

The results prove that his method is highly 
successful and profitable. Last year he sold 
in excess of $90,000 worth of Advance- 
Rumely machines ! 

Just as Advance-Rumely products are 
characterized by large capacity, long life 
and economy, Advance-Rumely dealers are 




/. O. Friah ia not worriting now about how to bu^ 
ahoea for the bab^. 

distinguished by the large volume of busi- 
ness that comes to them. 

The average Advance-Rumely dealer ex- 
periences a degree of satisfaction and profit 
that makes him the envy of other dealers. 
For he represents a line of power farming 
machinery possessing such inbuilt quality 
that, once this quality is known in a neigh- 
borhood, a growing permanent sale is de- 
veloped. 

There is yet time to secure a 1921 Rumely 
contract. Are you interested? Ask for details. 



ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER COMPANY, Inc. 
_, LaPorte« Indiana 

Calgary, Alta. Repna.Sask. 
Saskatoon, Sask. Winnipee. Man. 

48 Abell Street, Toronto, Ont. 




ADVANCj^=^UMELY 



8 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



Selling Points for the Silo 



The remarkable interest being 
shown in silos by the farmers in 
Western Canada is proof that the 
ase'ressive dealer should do all 
tjiat he can to boost the growth 
of ensilage crops in his district, 
'the smiflower is a splendid en- 
silage crop for the Canadian 
^^'est. It is a hardy and cold 
resisting plant and has been 
successfully grown in large 
acreages. In 1919 sunflowers 
yielded as high as 34.J^ tons per 



acre at the C.P.R. Demonstration 
Farm, at Strathniore, Alta., and 
38 tons per acre have been had. 
Sunflowers serve as a cleaning 
crop and as they are sown in 
the same way as corn and inter- 
tilled, they leave the land in good 
condition for crops to follow. 

The value of a crop preserved 
by a silo is increased about forty 
per cent over that of a crop har- 
vested in the usual way. 

Less room is required for the 



storage in a silo of the product 
of an acre of land than in cured 
condition in a barn. 

A much larger amount of di- 
gestible food can be secured from 
an acre of silage corn than from 
an acre of hay. 

The silo enables us to preserve 
a larger quantity of the food 
materials of the original fodder 
for the feeding of farm animals 
than is possible by any other 
system of preservation now 
known. 

Succulent food is nature's food. 

Since smaller barns may be 
built when silage is fed, there is 
less danger of fire, thus decreas- 
ing; the cost of insurance. 

Silage enables us to keep more 
stock, thereby increasing the fer- 
tility of the farm, which will in 
turn give us larger crops and 
affords a chance for more stock. 



Ensilage is considered the most 
economical part of the ration of 
dairy cows and young stock. It 
will save about one-third or more 
of all feeds fed in winter. 

Where hay-making is pre- 
cluded, as is sometimes the case 
with second crops, as clover, 
rowen, etc., on account of rainy 
weather late in the season, the 
silo will preserve the crop, so 
that the farmer may derive full 
l)enefit from it in feeding it to 
his stock. 

No danger of late summer 
droughts, as by using the silo 
with clover or other green sum- 
mer crops, early in the season, 
a valuable succulent feed will be 
at hand when pasture in most 
regions is apt to give out. 

Crops unfit for hay-making 
may be preserved in the silo and 
changed into a palatable food, 
such as thistles, weeds, etc. 

The harvest can be removed 
earlier, making it possible to 
finish fall plowing sooner and to 
seed the land down to grass or 
winter grain. 

The silo is the cheapest method 
of handling the crop, of storing 
it, and the best method of saving 
and realizing the fullest value of 
the crop as feed'. 

More stock can be kept on a 
certain area of land when silage 
is fed than is otherwise the case. 

Silage can be kept longer than 
any other succulent feed. 

All successful dairymen con- 
sider a good silo a very necessary 
part of their dairy equipment, 
and the silage contained therein 
greatly increases the milk flow. 



A Live Dealer 



A recent issue of the "Har- 
vester World" contains an inter- 
esting review of the business 
career of Charlie Congdon, the 
popular International Harvester 
dealer at Newdale,' Man. The 
article says : 

"He's full of energy, absolutely 
dependable in his sales argu- 
ments, and he looks diligently 
after his customers after 'they 
have signed and taken delivery. 
When a farmer becomes a pros- 
pect he has just started a long 
course of pleasant relations with 
Charlie." 

Mr. Congdon, who does an 
annual business of around $200,- 
000, is the son of an Ontario 
dealer. He commenced in the 
trade Avith the McCormick Co., 
at Winnipeg, and wor'ked for var- 
ious agents in Manitoba, finally 
with J. H. McLean, a't Shoal 
Lake. In 1909 Mr. Congdon 
opened at Newdale, where he has 
built up a remarkable business 
through sheer ability and per- 
sonal eflFort. 




Agents will find this machine a great 
seller. Write for terms to Agents. 



LONDON GEM CONCRETE MIXER 

This machine is suitable for such work as mixing 
mortar or concrete for floors, barn walls, founda- 
tions, silos or any work not requiring a capacity 
of over 20 yards per day. IT CAN BE RTJN BY 
HAND or connected to gasoline engine or any 
kind of power. It is well built and will save the 
price of itself in ten days' use. Described ia 
Bulletin A. 

LONDON CONCRETE MACHINERY CO., LTD: 



LONDON 



Dept. K- 



CANADA 




T 



The "Best SELLERS" 

The Separator with the Million Dollar Bowl! 

HE new Empire-Baltic— "The Separator with the Mil- 
lion Dollar Bowl"— is the most thoroughly modernized, 
simplified, and efficient Cream Separator on the mar- 
ket to-day. 

The advantages afforded by its simple construction, and im- 
proved bowl — spindle disconnected — are easily seen and 
appreciated — and it is these that will make Empire-Baltic 
Separators the best sellers in your district. 

EIGHT SIZES. CAPACITY from 135 to 1,000 Lbs. Per Hour. 



The New Pulsator T'^ 

4 -Year Guarantee 

The Empire Milking Machine has so proved 
its efficiency and superiority, that numbers of 
the large dairies have standardized on this 
equipment. 

The new pulsator of the Empire Milking 
Machine is the only pulsator with a four-year 
guarantee. This feature will strongly appeal 
to your prospects and help you make sales. 

You will be interested in the Empire dealer 
proposition. Write us for particulars. 

ROBINSON -ALAMO LTD. 

140 PRINCESS ST. 

Western Distributors of 






CREAM SEPARATORS AND MILKING MACHINES 

The Empire Cream Separator Co. of Canada^ Ltd. 



TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



9 



Proposal to Place Sale of Light- 
ning Rods Under License 



A bill before the Ontario house 
asks that no person or company 
shall sell lightning pro'tection 
systems unless under a license 
obtainable from the fire marshall 
of the province who must approve 
both the apparatus and method 
of installation. 

The maker or vendor must file 
a guarantee providing that in the 
event of damage by lightning to 
any rodded building, the cost of 
material, and installation shall be 
returned to the owner of the 
building or the damage repaired 
free of cost. To insure this guar- 
antee being carried out, the man- 
ufacturer or vendor must file a 
bond with the fire marshall to 
the amount of $10,000. A fee of 
$50 will be required before 'the 
issuance of any license and the 
manufacturer or vendor will also 
be required to pay a tax of 80 
cents for every $100 received from 
the sale of lightning rods and 
equipment in Ontario. Manu- 
facturers and vendors, as de- 
scribed above, may appoint 
agents for the sale of such appar- 
atus, but such agents must also 
hold a license which will be 
issued upon proper proof of repu- 
tation and character, for a fee of 
$3. 



De Laval Equipment 



In speaking of their milking 
machine, the De Laval Company 
contend that the De Laval milker 
is more useful and profitable to a 
dairyman than his binder, mower 
or manure spreader; yet there is 
no question as to ,the practica- 
bility of these machines. Milking 
comes twice a day, every day in 
the year. Harvesting grain re- 
quires but a few days once a year. 
A dairyman would better harvest 
his grain by hand than milk by 
hand. The idea of harvesting by 
hand is unthinkable — the cradle 
is a relic of by-gone days; and 
just as sure as swinging a cradle 
is a lost art ,so will hand milking 
be a lost art, and that time is not 
far distant. Whenever in the 
past any machine or device has 
been put upon the market which 
would either increase production 
or lower the cosit of production, 
the farmer has always been ready 
to buy, regardless of prices. The 
Milker does both ; it lowers the 
cost of production and increases 
production of one of our principal 
crops — milk. 

In talking of the value of dairy- 
ing to the community, F. D. 
Green, president of a bank in 
South Dakota, says : 

"I am firmly of ithe opinion that 
farmers must make dairying one 
of their principal lines of en- 



deavor in order to succeed in 
their business. My observation 
is that those farmers who rely 
upon the milk coav for a portion 
of their income throughout the 
year are our most prosperous cus- 
tomers . They do not have heavy 
*Titore bills to settle from the sale 
of their crops each fall. Their in- 
come is steadier and more uni- 
form and they are better able to 
withstand the vicissitudes of cli- 
mate and the risks of the business 
than those farmers who resort 
exclusively to grain growing. 



A Specialty That is in Big 
Demand 



F. N. McDonald & Co., 156 
Princess St., Winnipeg, announce 
that they have secured the selling 
rights for Canada, of the E-Z 
Way gate fastener, as sold in 
U.S. territory by the E-Z Way 
Sales Co., of Moorhead, Minn. 

This device has had a great sale 
to farmers in the U.S. It forms a 
perfect fastener for old-fashioned 
wire gates, of which there are 
vast numbers in the west. It can 



be applied in five minutes by the 
farmer, giving a taut and rigid 
gate that can be opened and 
closed by a child. With the wire 
loop fastener, hogs and other 
stock could get through the 
sagged gate ; this is impossible 
wiith the E-Z Way fastener. Any 
man who has had to drive a car 
or rig through the old wire gate 
recollects the trouble of opening 
and closing. This is the biggest 
sales argument for E-Z fasteneis; 
their price is such that they sell 
with very little efTont. 




Ulassey - HaiVis 




The Digger Gets 
the Gold 



|ATURE provided vast stores of mineral wealth for 
mankind. She placed quantities of gold, silver, 
iron, nickel, tin, platinum, mica, and coal in 
various continents, where they have lain for centuries 
awaiting the coming of the day when each would take its 
place in the commerce of the world. But they are down 
in the earth and down there they must stay until some- 
one digs them free. 

In every field of endeavour there are hidden possibilities 
which can be uncovered and turned into profit by all who 
realize that a little extra effort brings results. 

Soon in your district, the farmers will be at their 
harvesting. Massey- Harris Haying Machines, Grain Binders, 
Corn Harvesters, Ensilage Cutters, and Bain Grain Wagons 
will be used, discussed, and bought. There will be a 
harvest of sales for the man who is prepared to grip the 
shovel a little more firmly and dig right in — so dig for 
prospects, dig for sales and keep on digging until you 
have unearthed every sale in your territory. 

Tell your farmer friends how Massey- Harris Implements 
make good farming easy; tell them of the years of work 
our machines do; and tell them of the speedy, dependable 
service that we can give them. Now is the time to do it 
and remember, the digger gets the gold 

MASSEY-HARRIS CO., Ltd. 

Established 1847 



WINNIPEG 
CALGARY 



Branches in Western Canada at 

BRANDON REGINA . SASIC\TOON 

YORKTON SWIFT CURRENT EDMONTON 



10 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



With the Manufacturers 



The name of the National Steel 
Car Company, Limited, has been 
changed to that of Hamilton Car 
Company, Limited. 

R. H. Collins, president of 
Cadillac Motor Car Co., has 
announced that Cadillac prices 
will remain unchanged through- 
out 1921. 

M. W. Bartlett is the new- 
general manager of the Splitdorf 
Electrical Company, with head- 
quarters at the main factory, 
Newark, N. J. 

Hunt, Helm, Ferris & Co., 
Harvard, III, have announced a 
substantial reduction on their line 
of barn equipment, hay tools, 
door hangers, etc. 

The Macultivator Co., San- 
dusky, O., has changed its name 
to Motor-Macultivator Co., and 
will move its factory to 1306 Dorr 
St., Toledo, O. 

On all types of its lin- of 
portable and stationary elevators 
the Portable Elevator Mfg. Co., 
Bloomington, 111., has made a 
reduction of ten per cent. 



Increase Your Profits and 
Prestige by Selling 

Lister -Premier 

Cream Separators 

Seven Sizes. 

Capacities, 
lbs. per hour: 
220, 280, 
350, 
500, 
650, 
800, 
and 
1,000. 

British 
Built 



Leaders in Efficiency 

Simple in design. Finest mechanical finish. 
Short crank; easily turned. All moving parts 
run in oil. Gearing entirely enclosed. 
Aluminum discs cannot corrode. Easy running 
— easily cleaned. A high-grade separator at 
a reasonable price. 

The Lister Line Includes: 

"Lister" and "Canuck" Gasoline and Kerosene 
Engines, Grain Grinders and Crushers, Electric 
Lighting Plants, "Melotte" and "Lister- 
Premier" Cream Separators, Milking Machines, 
Churns, Ensilage Cutters, Silos, Sawing Out- 
fits, Pumps, Pump Jacks, Power Pumping 
Outfits, etc. 

R. A. Lister & Company 
(Canada) Limited 

Winnipeg :: :: Toronto 




The Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis., announces the 
appointment of H. G. Chandler 
as manager of its branch house 
at Des Moines, la. 

The plant of the Columbia 
Wagon Works, Columbia, Pa., 
which has been in the hands of 
a receiver, has been purchased at 
public sale by M. R. Hoffman. 

The Algoma Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Algoma, Wis., has 
completed recent additions to its 
factory and machine shop, due to 
increasing demands for ensilage 
cutters. 

The Minneapolis Steel and 
Machinery Company, announce 
that it has moved its New York 
offices from the present location 
in the Tribune Building to Suite 
2908 Woolworth Building. 

The Beeman Tractor Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn., on June 1st, 
moved their main offices, now 
located at 307 Sixth Avenue 
South, to the factory at Columbia 
Heights. 

H. H. Price, former treasurer 
of General Motors Corp., has 
been made the president of the 
Cadillac Motor Car Co., to suc- 
ceed ■ R. H. Collins who has 



MACKENZIE, THOM, 
BASTEDO & 
JACKSON 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

REGINA, SASK. 



Solicitors for: 
Advance-Rumely Thresher Co., 
Inc.; Aultman & Taylor Machin- 
ery Co., Lta.; Robt. Bell E. & T. 
Co.; J. I. Case Threshing Mach- 
ine Co.; Canadian Avery Co., Ltd.; 
Canadian Tillsoil Farm Motors, 
Ltd.; Canadian Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, Ltd.; DeLaval Dairy Sup- 
ply Co., Ltd.; Emerson-Branting- 
-ham Implement Co.; Hart-Parr 
Company; International Harvester 
Co. of Canada, Ltd.; A. Stanley 
Jones Co., Ltd.; Minneapolis Steel 
& Machinery Co. of Canada, Ltd.: 
Minneapolis Threshing Madiine 
Co.; Nichols & Shepard Company; 
Petrie Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ; 
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd.; Stewart 
Sheaf Loader Co., Ltd.; Tudhope 
Anderson Co., Ltd.; Watrous 
Engine Works Co., Ltd. 



resigned to head the new Durant- 
Collins Motor Co. 

The Sandusky Tractor Co. has 
been organized at Sandusky, O., 
and will take over the plant of 
the Dauch Mfg. Co. The com- 
pany has a capital s'tock of 
$100,000. • 

It is announced that the Cleve- 
land Tractor Co. of Canada will 
move their eastern head office 
from Montreal back to Windsor, 
Ont., where they were formerly 
located. 

The Gill Mfg. Co., Chicago, 
recently established branches at 
Spokane, Wash., and Houston, 
Tex. The company now has 
forty-one branches throughout 
the country. 

The schedule filed in connec- 
tion with the bankruptcy of the 
Monarch Tractor Co., Water- 
town, Wis., places the company's 
assets at $700,000 and the liabili- 
ties at $800,000. 

The Banwell, Hoxie Wire 
Fence Co., Ltd., Hamilton, On- 
tario, are issuing a new catalogue 
of their various styles of "Peer- 
less" wire fencing and other wire 
constructions. 

A report" from Great Britain 
states that over a thousand of 
the famous "Ideal" windmills, 
built by Goold, Shapley & Muir 
Co., Brantford, Ont., are in use 
in the United Kingdom. 

The De Laval Company, Limi- 
ted, has been given a license by 
the Ontario government to do 
business in Ontario, with power 
to use in this province capital to 
the extent of $500,000. 

The Bull Dog Tractor Co., 
Fond du Lac, Wis., has been 
reorganized under the name of 
Bull Dog Tractor Corp. The 
capital stock has been .reduced 
from $750,000 'to $250,000. 

J. P. Ripley has been appointed 
advertising manager of the Trac- 
tor and Implement Bearings Di- 
vision of the Hyatt Roller Bear- 
ing Company, Chicago, 111., to 
succeed H. M. Carroll, resigned. 

H. C. McWhinney, vice-presi- 
dent of the Empire Cream Separ- 
ator Co., Bloomfield, N.J., is now 
in charge of advertising in con- 



nection with the sales depart- 
ment of this company. 

The Hudson Mfg. Co., Minne- 
apolis, has increased its capital 
stock from $1,200,000 to $2,000,- 
000. This company has been 
expanding its interests by the 
purchase of additional plants in 
different locations. 

A rotary snow plow, designed 
for use either with tractors or 
motor trucks, is to be manufac- 
tured by the Milwaukee Snow 
Conveying Co., Milwaukee, Wis., 
a new corporation with a capi- 
tal stock of $25,000. 

Supervisional sales managers 
from all over the United States 
and Canada gathered a't the fac- 
tory offices of the Hart-Parr Co., 
Charles City, la., during May to 
plan an intensive campaign on 
summer sales. 

Orlo S. Barrett has resigned 
as advertising manager of the 
Studebaker Corporation of Amer- 
ica, South Bend, Ind. Mr. Bar- 
rett had been with the Stude- 
baker organization for nearly 
twenty years. 

The British-American Oil Co. 
will establish a branch at Cam- 
rose, Al'ta. A site has been se- 
cured and operations on the erec- 
tion of a warehouse and two 
storage tanks ' will commence 
immediately. 

Chas. H. Morse, who developed 
the large business of Fairbanks, 
Morse & . Co., died at Orlando, 
Fla., May 5. He had been ill 
during the past two months. Mr. 
Morse was born in St. Johnsbury, 
Vt., Sept. 23, 1833. 

The Falk Co., Milwaukee, has 
changed its name to the Falk 
Corp. and increased its capital 
stock to $8,000,000. It is reported 
that the Company is planning to 
engage extensively in the manu- 
facture of oil engines. 

It is reported that the La 
Crosse Tractor Co., La Crosse, 
Wis., will move to Oshkosh, Wis. 
Steps will be taken to reorganize 
the concern under the name of 
Oshkosh Tractor Co., with a 
capital stock of $1,500,000. 

The A. H. W. Carburetor Co., 
Newark, N.J., has been organized 




Mr. DEALER 

The Farmers are asking for 

CATER*S PUMPS 

His goods are the standard, and prices 
are right. 

BE SURE and send your orders to 
CATER, and get the business in your 
district. 

H. CATER, Brandon, Man. 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



11 



IIIIIIIIII1IIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IINII)IIII{IIIIIIIIIIIIIN1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!II1IIIIIIIINI!IIIIII^ lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIlin^ Ilj 






iMT BRISCOE 

Four-Cylindered 
Economy in a Car 
That Can Keep Pace 
With the Most Powerful 




EALERS are finding an increasing tendency 
among to-day's motor car buyers to 
favor the 4-cylinder car because of its 
' greater economy and efficiency. 

If you are seelcing the car that offers both 
these features in the highest degree, the New 
Briscoe will command your attention from the 
outset. 

The performance of the 4-cylinder Briscoe 
engine exemplifies every trait of the bigger and 
higher-priced cars — with one exception — Briscoe's 
fuel consumption is lower. 

The compact power plant is mounted on a 
chassis, strong but light, giving just the proper 
balance of "Power with Economy." 

The 4-cylinder type is coming into its own — 
recognized as combining efficiency with economy. 
And of all 4-cylinder cars, the New Briscoe is 
most clearly demonstrating the fact that a car 
can give fine service and develop high speed 
when called upon, without running up big bills 
for gasoline and oil. 

Moto-meter, non-glare headlight lenses, and a com- 
plete instrument board are only a few features of its 
equipment. 

These features combined in a smart appearing 
car of moderate price, give the Briscoe dealer the profit- 
able advantage of representing "The Greatest Value Car 
on the Market." 

Our dealer proposition is unusually interesting. 
If your territory is open--write us. 

We specially invite all Dealers to Inspect the 
Briscoe Line of Cars, both at the Western Cana- 
dian Fairs and at our Dealers' Showrooms. 

DEALERS WANTED IN OPEN TERRITORY 



THE 

Canadian Briscoe Motor Company 

LIMITED 



Head Office and Factory 



Brockville, Ont. 



Western Service Station, 156 Princess St., Winnipeg, 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS: 
F. N. McDonald & Co., 156 Princess St., Winnipeg. 
McKee Motor Company - - Regina Diamond Motor Co. - - - Calgary 
Gillespie-Mansell - - - Saskatoon J. R. N. Cooke - - . Edmonton 
Dominion Motors, Limited, 1033 Georgia St., West Vancouver. 



Sprayers - - Diggers 

Machines to meet EVERY REQUIREMENT of the Potato 
Grower— Built of FIRST-CLASS MATERIAL and WORK- 
MANSHIP. ASPINWALL SPRAYERS are SIMPLE- 
EFFICIENT and our digger is built to stand the WEAR 
and TEAR expected of these machines. 



Backed by 

' ASPINWALL GUARANTEE 
TO BE EXACTLY AS REPRE- 
SENTED BY US AND TO DO 
ALL WE CLAIM 



Manufactured by 

WORLD'S OLDEST AND 
LARGEST MAKERS OF 
POTATO MACHINERY 

This is YOUR OPPORTUNITY to develop a PROFITABLE 
TRADE and be in a position to COMMAND the potato 
machinery business in your territory. 

Write for Descriptive Literature and Prices 

Aspinwall Canadian Co., Ltd. 

Guelph, Ontario, Canada 

DISTRIBUTORS: 

Wm. Eddie, Winnipeg, Man. E. A. Sharman Co., Lethbridge, Alta. 




12 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



and incorporated by L. St. Jac- 
ques, x\rthur H. \Veber and E. 
T. Frazen, with a capital stock 
of $200,000. 

The Rock Island Plow Co. 
annoimces a general cut in price 
taking- effect immediately on all 
its line of farm implements with 
the exception of those tools on 
which a cut had already been 
made a short time ago. 

The Montana Tractor Co., 
Oconto, Wis., has completed its 
new factory at a cost of $46,300. 
The plant will have a capacity 
of from six to ten machines daily 
and all parts except engines, rad- 
iators and chains will be built. 

The Big- Farmer Tractor Corp. 
has located at Stevens. Point, 
Wis., where the $500,000 concern 
will erect its factory. The trac- 
tor to be built is the M. P. M., 
designed by A. J. Patch, former 
chief engineer of the Hart-Parr 
Co. 

George W. Mixter, former 
vice-president of Deere & Co., 
Moline, 111., and who has been 
associated with George W. 
Goethals & Co. for the past 'two 
years, has been made president 
of the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car 
Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Under the new name of the 
Ann Arbor Machine Co., what 
was formerly the Ann Arbor 



Machine Corporation, of Ann 
Arbor, Mich., has been reorgan- 
ized with tr. M. Tallman, of 
Shelbyville, 111., as president and 
general manager. 

The Flood Tractor Co., 
Spokane, ^^'ash., expects to have 
its four-drive tractor on the 
market within a few weeks. The 
company is to be reorganized 
with a 'capital of $1,000,000 and 
its name will be changed to Inter- 
national Automotive Corp. 

R. W. Sutherland has resigned 
as vice-president and general 
manager of the Splitdorf Electri- 
cal Co., Newark, N. J. The 
resignation also carries retire- 
ment from the presidency of the 
Splitdorf branches in Chicago, 
New York and Toronto. 

On May 4, the Hart-Parr Co., 
Charles City, la., reduced the 
price of their .Hart-Parr "20" 
tractor, $200, from $1,195 to $995 
factory cash list. The factory is 
gradually increasing producion of 
the "20" and shipments are mov- 
ing steadily forward to the field. 

The Hudson Mfg. Co., of Min- 
neapolis, has closed a deal for the 
business of the Pull-Easy Mfg. 
Co., Waukesha, Wis., manufac- 
turing a line of adjustable garden 
tools. The line includes hand and 
wheel garden cultivators, combin- 
ation rakes and similar articles. 




Two Profits From 
SILO SALES 

THE DEALER who sells the Ideal Green 
Feed Silo makes two profits. The first 
one is his regular dealer's profit; the 
second and much larger profit is the one 
that comes to him through the immed- 
iately increased prosperity of his commun- 
ity. Actually the second profit is so large 
and so certain that, if necessary, the dealer 
could well afford to forgo his selling margin. 

madein'can^a An Ideal Silo on Every Farm 

Would immediately increase land values and the 
farmers' buying power. Credit sales and bad debts would 
be reduced to the minimum and the dealer's capital would 
turn over three times where it turns once to-day. Agri- 
cultural prosperity follows the use of the Silo ; it means the 
equivalent of June pastures in January and greater pro- 
duction at less cost. , 

THE IDEAL SILO 

Is made of carefully selected materials and every 
detail of it is fully up to the high standard of other 
De Laval products. Years of experience in Silo construc- 
tion have taught us every requirement, with the result 
that the "Ideal" is in fact what its name implies. The 
sale of Silos will represent a big business this year and in 
future years and with the two-fold profit in mind, every 
De Laval dealer should immediately take steps to benefit 
himself and his community by securing a contract for the 
sale of the Ideal. 

Catalogue and full particulars on request. Act now, so that your 
customers may make provision for a silage crop this year. 



Vancouver 



The De Laval Company Ltd. 



WINNIPEG 



Edmonton 



According to the annual re- 
port of the Advance-Rumely 
Thresher Co., Laporte, Ind., the 
ne't profits of that organization 
for 1920, after charges, federal 
taxes and inventory adjustment, 
were $1,277,231. Gross profits 
for the same calendar year were 
$4,971,121. 

The London Concrete Machin- 
ery Co., at London, Ont., have 
lately experienced a great in- 
crease of export orders, and are 
enlarging their plant to meet this 
demand. It is further understood 
that this company are about to 
erect a large plant for the pro- 
duction of gasoline engines. 

A. H. Gardner has resigned 'the 
position of secretary of the Her- 
schel-Roth Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Minneapolis, to take over 
the exclusive sale of a knotter 
hook that will successfully handle 
any kind or size of binder twine 
and can be attached to any make 
of binder. 

The Power Farming Bureau, 
754 Monadnock Building, Chi- 
cago, 111., has been organized by 
the Tractor and Thresher Depart- 
ment of the National Implement 
and Vehicle Association. George 
E. Fuller, former secretary of 
the National Gas Engine and 
Farm Power Association, has 
been selected as manager. 

The Post-AVhitney Co. with an 
authorized capital of $10,000,000, 
has taken over the Whitney 
Tractor Co., Upper Sandusky, 
O., and the Post Tractor Co., 
Cleveland. The Pos't- Whitney 



Co. will continue to operate both 
plants, manufacturing the Post 
tractor at Cleveland and the 
Whitney tractor at Upper San- 
dusky. 

General Forgings and Stamp- 
ings, Limited, is the name of a 
new company, incorporated with 
a Dominion charter, to take over 
as a going concern the assets and 
liabilities of General Forgings 
and Stampings, Limited. The 
new corporation will, it is under- 
stood, engage. in the manufacture 
of steel disc automobile wheels 
on an extensive scale. Their 
extensive powers also permit 
them to engage in the manufac- 
ture of wagons, automobiles, and 
many other kindred lines. The 
authorized capital is $900,000. 
The head office will be at Mer- 
ritton, Ont. 



Lister Travellers Met 



Early in the month W. J. 
Ellis, general manager of 'the 
R. A. Lister Co. (Canada) Ltd., 
whose headquarters are at Tor- 
onto, spent a few days at the 
Winnipeg branch of the company. 
The travellers in Manitoba terri- 
tory held a series of sessions with 
the executives of the company 
and means to increase business 
were fully discussed. Accom- 
panied by D. N. Jamieson, West- 
ern manager, Mr. Ellis then went 
west to Edmonton where a sim- 
ilar meeting was held with the 
travellers in Alberta and West 
Saskatchewan territory. 




For Summer Fallowing 



Summer-fallowing can be done easier, quicker, and BETTER — 
■with the Gray Tractor. 

The Wide Drive Drum rolls the weeds flat ahead of the plows, 
making them easily covered, and preserving the moisture. The side 
arm hitch makes four operations possible in one. 

See the Gray at your exhibition. 

Some good districts still open for dealers. 

Gray Tractor Co. of Canada, Limited 

Office and Showrooms, Lombard St., 0pp. Grain Exchange 
WINNIPEG 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS: 
Northern Machinery Co., Lethbridge and Calgary; C. Waring Co., 
Moose Jaw; The Tractor Co., Ltd., Saskatoon. 



June, 1921 




Backed By Two Big Selling Forces— 

IMPERIAL Lubricants are backed by two powerful selling forces 
that are always on the job. One of these is continuous adver- 
tising which reaches practically every Canadian farmer. The other, 
which is even more effective, is the very quality of the oils — they 
sell themselves. 

You sell farmers their implements. Naturally they expect you to 
tell them what oils to use. Why not go a step further and 
supply them with Imperial Lubricants? By doing so you insure 
satisfaction with every tool you sell and, in addition, establish a 
good-paying, year 'round oil business. 

Stock up with the full line of Imperial Lubricants and you can 
meet every need a farnier has. Imperial Lubricants give the kind 
of satisfaction that brings customers back again and again. They 
attract other farmers, too, and open up new trade in implements 
as well as oils. 

Let the Imperial Oil Salesman tell you all about our 
attractive dealer agreement — it will interest you. 

IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED 

Power - Heat - Light - Lubrication 

BRANCHES IN ALL CITIES 



14 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



The U.S. Automobile Industry 

The U. S. National Automobile 
Chamber of Commerce recently 
issued very interesting statistics 
covering the production in the 
automobile industry in the United 
States for the year 1920. 

The value of complete car and 
truck output was $2,232,927,678; 
of parts and accessories manufac- 



tured, $725,136,942; tire replace- 
ment ouitput, $636,750,000. The 
number of automobiles produced 
was 1,883,158 during 1920, and 
322,039 motor trucks — a gain of 
12 per cent over 1919 production. 
At the end of the year there were 
9,211,295 motor vehicles regis- 
ter.ed in the United States, of 
which approximaitely three mil- 
lion were owend by farmers. 

The capital invested in the in- 
dustry was $1,204,378,642; num- 
ber of employees, 325,000; wages 
and salaries, $482,950,000. 

The total of gasoline produced 
was 4,882,546,699 gallons; gaso^ 
line* consumption, 4,256,428,005 
gallons. Tire production was ap- 
proximately 32,400,000. 

It is stated that 33,893 dealers 
are selling cars in the United 
States ; 35,887 garages and 45,- 
135 repair shops are in operation. 
Nearly 22,000 dealers are selling 
motor trucks produced by 222 
factories. Approximately 100,000 
trucks are in use on U. S. farms; 
19 per cent of the trucks sold 
were %-ton ; 51 per cent 1-ton; 
11 per cent l^-a-ton and the bal- 
ance larger capacities. 



Sold to Canada 

During 1920 Canada imported 
8,046 passenger cars from ithe 
United States, with a value of 
$10,869,891. We also bought 
2,149 motor trucks made in 
U.S.A., valued at $4,187,597. The 
value of parts purchased by Can- 
ada from the U.S. last year came 
to the enormous total of $21,635,- 
691. Canada's purchases of cars 
rnade in the United States, for the 
last three years, are : 1918, 8,543 ; 
1919, 8,826; 1920, 8,046. Our 
motor truck imports increase, be- 
ing as follows: 1918, 1,596; 1919, 
1,858; 1920, 2,149. 

The increased cost of passenger 
cars is evident from the following 
figures. The value of the 8,543 
cars w^e purchased from the U.S. 
in 1918 was $7,141,405: in 1919, 
8,826, with a value of $9,393,009. 
and 1920, 8,046, with a value of 
$10,869,891. 



International Calendars for 1922 



The International Harvester 
Co. of Canada is now receiving 
orders from its dealers for the 1922 
calendar of the company, delivery 
of which will be made between 



August 1 and the end of the year. 
The calendar is 24x12 inches and 
is very attractive, with an espe- 
cially fine illustration. 



Will Exhibit at Fairs 



The Winnipeg headquarters of 
the De Laval Company Ltd. 
announce that they will put on. 
an interesting exhibit at the fairs 
to be held 'this summer at Cal- 
gary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, 
Brandon and Regina. The ex- 
hibit will embody demonstrations 
of the De Laval milking machine 
in operation, while the advan- 
tages of sunflower ensilage for 
winter feeding will be demon- 
strated by. the showing of Ideal 
Green Feed Silos as manufac- 
tured by the De Laval organ- 
ization. 



C. G. E. Expansion 

Owing to the substantial de- 
velopment that has taken place 
in the electrical equipment busi- 
ness of the Canadian Genera'. 
Electric, Toronto, it has been 
found necessary to take over 
some of the space that has 
formerly been included in the 
Allis-Chalmers plant. 



Swedish Separator Co. Occupy 
New Offices 



The Eastern Canadian branch 
of the Swedish Separator Co. 
recently moved to new quarters 
in Montreal, where they are now 
located at 36 Notre Dame Ave. 
With over 3,000 fee't of floor 
space .they have a large repair 
and assembly shop. The Winni- 
peg branch also moved recently 
and now occupy commodious 
warehouses and office quarters at 
the corner of William and Mc- 
Phillips St., Winnipeg. 



Case Branch Had Fire Loss 



On May 7th, fire broke out in 
the office of the J. I. Case Thresh- 
ing Machine Co., Notre Dame 
Ave. East, Winnipeg. The fire 
was soon under control and only 
the ofifice furniture sufifered. 



A Twine Selling Policy 

A firm at Trenton, Mo., has a 
policy in twine sales which means 
that the farmers get their twine 
on a variable price system. At 
the start of the season the twine 
is sold out of the car at just one- 
half cent profi!t. Farmers who 
want to get it out of the car at 
these terms can do so. When 
the stock of twine gets into the 
store, however, it is sold at a 
cen't-and-a-half margin, cash. On 
time sales, two cents above in- 
voice are added on twine. 



PUMPS 



AND 

Clothes Reels 

Made in the best 
equipped factory 
in Canada. 
We make and 
handle pumps for 
all kinds of work. 
We also install 
hydro-pneumatic 
Farm Water sys- 
tems. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

The Riesberry Pump Co. 

(EsUbllshed 1882) 

WRITE FOR DEALERS' PRICES 




North-West Pump Co. 

T. N. WILLIAMSON W. J. MEBBELL 
Fbone 607 

19-6th Street Brandon, Man. 




Handle Lister-Bruston Automatic Electric 

Lighting Plants 

We manufacture 14 sizes of electric lighting plants. Capacities 
from 14 to 1,500 lights. There is a type for every demand — farms, 
town houses, churches, schools, halls, etc. Either belt-driven or 
direct-connected. Driven by the famous single, twin and four- 
cylinder Lister slow-speed engine, fhe most simple, economical 
and efficient platfts sold. We can supply a lighting plant for any 
requirement. Your customer can use his own engine. Tell us 
what your prospect requires and we will quote you. 

FULL PARTICULARS SENT ON REQUEST. 



Lister Milking Machines 

Simple, Sanitary and Trouble Proof 

In single or double units. The Lister pulsator gives perfect release 
of the teats, and its stroke is instantly adjustable to suit the individual 
cow. Our milker operates with any 1% H.P. engine or motor. Economical 
for even the man with a few cows. 





Cream 
Separators 

12 SIZES: CAPACITIES from 
280 to 1,300 Pounds 

Good business and good profits go with 
the Melotte agency. Melotte reputation 
for quality construction and close skimming 
has never been equalled. Self-balancing, 
frictionless bowl. 

SEASONABLE LISTER LINES INCLUDE: 

Lister and Canuck Engines, Lighting Plants, Melotte 
and Lister-Premier Cream Separators, Silos, Ensilage 
Cutters, Pumps, Pump Jacks, etc. . 




LISTER SILOS ARE IN 
GOOD DEMAND 

Our Stave Silos give long lite 
and complete satisfaction. Every 
sale nets a nice profit for the dealer. 
With a sunflower crop the farmer 
is assured ample, palatable winter 
feed. Let us send you full particu- 
lars of this line. 

GET OUR PROPOSITION. 



/?. A. LISTER & CO. {Canada) LTD. 

WINNIPEG TORONTO 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



15 




How are We Going to Cut Costs this Year? 

— that is the momentous question that faces every 
substantial manufacturing concern. 

And so it is with the farmer. He must plow larger 
acreage at less costs per acre, his belt work must be 
accomplished better and cheaper, he must overcome 
the time-wasting handicaps imposed by the weather. 

The tractor has proven its ability to lower costs 
and increase production. Therefore, the farmer needs 
a tractor this year more than ever. 

The extreme simplicity of the G-O Tractor, both in 
construction and operation, makes it fit in to the 
farmer's business policy. Greater production at less 
cost. More G-O Tractors in your territory will mean 
more money in the pockets of your customers- 
more money to buy other things from you. 

Write immediately for the G-O Dealers* Proposition. 



The General Ordnance Co., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 




^= ^= The Tractor Co. Limited 



Saskatoon, Sask. 

Distributor tor Northern Saskatchewan 



The Tractioneers 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Distributor for Manitoba 



Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co. Limited 

Regina, Sask. 

Distributor for Southern Saskatchewan 



16 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 




THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
INTERPROVINCIAL RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION 

AND 

SASKATCHEWAN RETAIL IMPLEMENT DEALERS' ASSOCIATION . 

A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER 
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF DEALERS IN AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
TRACTORS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, VEHICLES, ENGINES AND MACHINERY 

Established in 1904 and Published Monthly by 

Canadian Farm Implements, Limited 

812 CONFEDERATION LIFE BLD6. WINNIPEG, CANADA 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
$1.00 per year In Canada: Foreign $1.25 per year 



Single Copies, Ten Cents 



ADVERTISING 
RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION 
Change of Advertising Copy should reach this ofiSoe not later than the 25th of the 
month preceding issue in which insertion is desired. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Solicited on all matters pertinent to the implement and vehicle trade. As an 
evidence of good faith, but not necessarily for publication, every correspondent 
must sign his name. We reserve the right to edit all matter 
submitted but do not undertake to endorse opinions 
expressed by correspondents. 

Member Western Canada Press Association 
Entered in the Winnipeg Post OflBce as second class matter. 



WINNIPEG, CANADA, JUNE, 1021. 



Helping the Situiation 

In this period of business de- 
pression many claims are made 
that farmers are on a "buyers' 
strike", and that whatever price 
farm equipment is offered at they 
will not buy. But the fact re- 
mains that many cannot buy 
from lack of funds. 

Restriction of financial accom- 
modation may be a sound policy 
for financial institutions in times 
like the present, but how can the 
banks expect the rural communi- 
ties to prosper if they do not help 
them where necessary to get 
equipment which is of vital value 
in getting- economical production 
and bigger acreage. It is well 
known to-day that whatever the 
credit rating of a farmer, in most 
cases he cannot get accommoda- 
tion — even in the best districts. 
In the end this must lead to long 
term sales — a factor that we had 
been getting away from, and in 
the final analysis money to fin- 
ance 'those sales must come from 
somewhere, if the farmer is to 
carrjr on. 

It will pay the farmer to-day 
to exert his' powers to effect a 
readjustment of commodity prices 
and production costs to a fair 
and stabilized basis. The solu- 
tion of our present problem is 
balanced readjustment. The far- 
mer has most to gain finally by 
producing as much primary 
wealth as his land wjU yield. 
Prosperity is based upon produc- 
tion — but production at this time 
calls for judicious financing of 
the farmer by financial institu- 
tions. It is hard to sell a fanning 
mill to a farmer when the price 
represents half a carload of oats. 

And if the period of deflation 
through which we are passing 
has taught our business men any- 
thing, it should have impressed 
upon them the absolute necessity 
for adequate financial reserves to 
take care of the "lean" years that 
follow the "fat" years. 



Getting Settlement of Freight 
Claims 



The most satisfactory v^ay to 
obtain quick results from railway 
and express companies in the 
settling of claims is to have your 
claims complete in every sense 
when forwarded-. By that we 
mean, attach all the necessary 
papers and information to prove 
the responsibility against the 
railway. 

The papers needed to support 
a claim against a railway for a 
freight shipment are : The orig- 
inal bill of lading or a copy of the 
same, the invoice or certified 
copy, and a statement of loss 
showing just what goods are 
short or damaged and their actual 



cost to you. To this you may 
add your expenses, such as cart- 
age, picking the goods over, re- 
packing, etc. Always allow the 
railway company any salvage 
which you have been able to 
obtain. 

In express shipments you can 
only forward the invoice or certi- 
fied copy and a statement of 
claim. If you follow these in- 
structions you should not have 
very much trouble, if any at all, 
in obtaining a settlement from 
the claims department. 



The Future of Tractor >Design 

Considering 'the variety of trac- 
tors shown at any great tractor 
exposition, the average dealer — 
and even the average engineer — 
is forced to admit that the prime 
necessity in the tractor business 
seems to be a definite s'tandard 
in construction and design. The 
fact is that there is perhaps more 
known in general and less in 
particular, about the tractor than 
about any other farm machine. 
Recent specification figures show 
that in the United States and 
Canada there are some 325 trac- 
tors of some 225 different makes 
on sale. They cannot all be per- 
fect from an engineering stand- 
point, and it is safe to say that 
no one knows whether any one 
tractor or type of tractor is the 
last word in efficiency. 



The need for research work on 
tractors to provide some definite 
and well-established working- 
prmciples to be used in design 
and manufacture is reflected, both 
in the large number of different 
makes for sale and in the tractor 
inspection laws which have come 
into effect in certain states, 
notably Nebraska. 



Handle Advertised Lines 



Don't carry dead stock — make 
your capital work all the time. 
If you handle only fast-selling 
lines, you can reduce your capital 
investment from twenty-five to 
fifty per cent. Quick turnovers 
are the things which you must 
have nowadays if you are going 
to keep your banker satisfied and 
show a profit a,t the end of the 
year. Everywhere bankers are 
urging merchants to reduce 
stocks to be ready to face a fall- 
ing market, and to be safe all the 
time. There is only one way you 
you can do this, and that is, carry 
the goods which sell fastest. That 
means advertised goods, (the kind 
that the farmers in your com- 
munity know about. If you have 
these lines in your store, and let 
the farmers know that you have 
them, you can do a big business 
on small capital without long- 
time investments in slow-moving, 
profit-losing stock. 



Electricity on the Farm 

The possibilities of electricity 
ijti the farm are unlimited. Elec- 
tricity will provide the rural 
population with practically all 
the conveniences of city life, and 
besides provide an economical 
means of performing much of the 
work to be done on a modern 
tarm. Farm help is high priced, 
difficult to secure, hard to . hold, 
therefore the alleviation of man- 
ual labor is a desirable aim. Elec- 
tricity will do this. 

It will light the home, the barn, 
dairy buildings, yards, etc., by 
the pushing of a button. It will 
provide current to operate fans, 
blowers for. forges, pumps, mot- 
ors for talking machines, sew- 
ing machines, dish washers, 
pianos, ice cream.- freezers, cream 
separators, churns, vacuum clean- 
ers, refrigerator machines, milk- 
ing machines, feed grinders, 
hoists, emery grinders, drills and 
machine tools of various kinds. 

In short, it opens up 'to the 
resident on the farm all the pos- 
S|ibilities of comfort and conve- 
nience that a resident of the city 
enjoys, and as one of the prob- 
lems, of the day is to keep the 
boys and girls on the farm, the 
more attractive the conditions of 
life are made for them, the more 
likely they are to remain. 

The average farmer with an 
automobile and an electric light 
and power plant, will consider 
himself more favorably situated 
than his city brother. 



Co-operation in Shortening 
Terms 



It is far better to lose a dozen 
doubtful credit sales than it is 
to have the money tied up in 
book accounts at the moment 
when you most need it in order 
to keep your own credit unsullied. 

If any dealer hesitates about 
combating the credit evil alone, 
it is a simple matter 'to hold a 
conference with his competitors 
and reach a "gentleman's agree- 
ment", whereby terms can be 
shortened and conditions for ob- 
taining retail credit made more 
exacting. You will usually find 
that your competitors are pretty 
good fellows after all, and that 
there will be more business and 
more profit for all of you if you 
will work together instead of 
fighting one another. 

The Restriction of Buying 

Did any business man who is 
almost exclusively a seller ever 
succeed or ever attempt to sell 
in maximum c^uantities upon a 
declining market? It does not 
stand to reason. There is not a 
man who is buying anything to- 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



17 



day that he doesn't need, and 
there is not a man who expects 
to sell anybody to-day anything 
tha't anybody doesn't need. That 
is the proposition ; and we_ regard 
as real salesmanship to-day, the 
salesman who will go out and 
see the dealer, tell him frankly 
that he doesn't expect him to buy 
something he doesn't require, 
any more than the dealer expects 
the farmer to buy something 'that 
he doesn't require, to produce at 
a minimum cost. 



Personal 



Corporation Buys Fibre 



The Eric Corporation, New 
York, in which the Royal Bank 
of Canada is interested, recently 
moved its offices to the third floor 
of the building in which the bank 
has it offices in the above city. 
This corporation has adopted 
plans for the marketing of the 
stock of Mexican sisal now exist- 
ing in the United States and also 
for handling some, at least, of 
the current production of Yuca- 
tan planters. It is working in 
conjunction with the Mexican 
Federal Government's Comision 
Moneteria. This Comision began 
to buy sisal in Merida lately, and 
within seven or eight days it had 
bought beween 15,000 and 20,000 
l)ales. 



Twine Demand Late 



Commenting upon the binder 
twine market, Cordage Trade 
Journal says'in a recent issue: 

"Complaints come in that far- 
mers have been very backward 
about providing for their require- 
ments of binder twine for the 
coming domestic harvests, and 
fear is felt that they may dglay 
too long, with the result that 
sufficient twine will not be on 
hand when it is actually needed 
to bind the crops. Inquiries for 
export are increasing, and with 
conditions, notably exchange, im- 
proving it is thought that a good- 
sized export business will be done 
later in the year. 



Make the Floor Attractive 



Did you ever think how you 
could make your salesroom take 
on a new appearance, or how feed 
grinders, engines, washers and 
lighting plants are excellently 
adapted for arrangement as an in- 
door display? Such floor arrange- 
ments can be worked up very at- 
tractively without undue cost, and 
when so handled prove good busi- 
ness getterg, because out of every 
ten persons who look them over, 
some one is going to betray an 
extraordinary interest that can be 
crystallized into a sale. 



A new dealer at Eden 's G. H. 
.McCracken. 

Edgar Bruce is a harness dealer 
at Poplar Point. 

G. A. Nordall has opened a gar- 
age at Wynyard. 

Carl Williams has opened a 
garage at Roblin. 

W. R. Ileavenor is opening a 
garage at Calgary. 

J. R .Taylor is running an auto 
concern at Invermay. 

Roy's Garage at Moose Jaw is 
now out of business. 

L. A. Rush has opened an auito 
business 'at Dundurn. 

John Mardin has opetied a har- 
ness shop at Glenella. 

J. E. Lemay is commencing a 
garage at St. Norbert. 

Batchelor & Johnson have sold 
their garage at Edmonton. 

S. Strickland is succeeded by 
E. B. Eldon, at Milestone. 

O. Petrie has discontinued his 
motor business at Kelliher. 

Joseph Bergman has discon- 
tinued his garage at Bruno. 

R. D. L. Warren is now selling 
farm machinery at Isabella. 

Simon Simonson is handling 
farm machinry a,t Wolseley. 



W'asyl Kaslyniuk is now sell- 
ing implements at Tolstoi. 

B. Clark, of the Busy Bee gar- 
age, Balcarres, died recently. 

J. Robinson has opened an im- 
plement shop at Cartwright. 

Austin Miller is owner of an 
implement shop at Dunleath. 

M. Kubb has discontinued his 
garage business at Amaranth. 

Harvey Sannister has located 
in ,the garage business at Gray. 

Brownlee and Dixon have 
opened a garage at Rocanville. 

The Regina Vulcanizing Co., 
Ltd., is incorporated at Regina. 

George Carey has bought an 
automobile business at Sleeman. 

J. Teasley has opened a tire and 
vulcanizing shop at Drurnhclkr. 

Vegreville has a new imple- 
ment dealer in W. H. Ferguson, 

M. Rodger has commenced an 
implement warehouse at Duval. 

M. Jackson of High Bluff is 
succeeded by Jackson & Tuckey. 

R. F. Linton has commenced 
an implement business at Eden. 

Sask. Motors Co. of Regina, 
had a slight loss by fire recently. 

Stewart & Wilkinson are a new 
implement concern at Carmichael. 

Jos. Filyk of Scepter is adver- 
tising his garage business for sale. 



Now is the Time to Prepare 
For Fall Business 

WHATEVER the difficulties in securing 
business at the present, do not for- 
get that the dealer who is prepared 
will get his share of Fall business. There never 
was Fall work done but the farmers had a 
demand for implements and repairs. 



Whatever his attitude now, when Fall comes 
the customer will want the goods promptly. 
Prove your alertness as a dealer by being in a 
position to supply the needs of the trade 
quickly. The dealer who does this will make 
most sales. 

Let no sales opportunity pass this year. No 
man should order more goods than his know- 
ledge of the territory dictates. But no man 
should make possible the loss of sales by failing 
to have sufficient stock on hand. Now, and 
not later, is a good time to estimate your Fall 
requirements and arrange for their supply. 
Foresight is always better than hindsight. 



Jas. D. McAllister is dealing in 
implements and tractors at Estu- 
ary. 

John Hamilton has entered the 
farm machinery trade at Star 
City. 

Stevens & Carle have opened a 
garage and auto business at Oak 
Lake. 

H. Leachman has started in ti.e 
oil and accessory business at 
Girvin. 

Barber & Eraser of Summer- 
berry, have sold out to N. H. 
Brown. 

The Market Harness Shop, at 
Edmonton, was recently damaged 
by fire. 

The Griffith Motor Co. of 
Winnipeg, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

Richard Jeffreys has started a 
garage and accessory business at 
Dugald. 

P. Dawson, garage owner a,t 
Benito suffered a small fire loss 
recently. 

Young Bros., of Young, have 
sold out their farm machinery 
business. 

Kirby & Hicks have opened a 
garage and tractor repair business 
at Ninga. 

J. A. Tate is now dealer for the 
International Harves'ter Co., at 
Milestone. 

The Gordon Garage, at Vic- 
toria, has been sold out to P. W. 
Dempster. 

P. C. Dawson, of Benito, auto- 
mobile dealer, suffered a fire loss 
recently. 

McColl Bros. Ltd., oil company 
of Toronto, have opened a branch 
at Regina. 

The Riddel Carriage and Motor 
Works, Ltd., are incorporated at 

Saskatoon. 

Alexander & Farrell have com- 
menced in ,the implement business 
at Ponoka. 

F. E. Block has sold his imple- 
ment store at Daysland, to Elle- 
son Wallis. 

The Northern Vulcanizing 
Works have dissolved partnership 
at Kelliher. 

Harney Bros, and R. Jamieson 
are two new garage owners at 
Moose Jaw. 

B. Ransom has entered the 
garage and auto business at 
Shellmouth. 

Gillert Bros, had a fire loss in 
their implement business ait Cam- 
per, recently. 

J. E. Guilbault. implement and 
machinery dealer at FanHvstelle, 
has sold out. 

Mr. McMillan has opened a 
blacksmith and implement shop 
at Strathclair. 

Cory Bros, of Briercrest, mach- 



18 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



incry dealers, have sold out to 
O. C Johnson. 

A. McConnell, garage owner at 
Eatonia, is succeeded by McCon- 
nell & Collins. 

Jas. Ramsay has sold his imple- 
ment and livery busines^s to B. 
Avery, Lauder. 

Elniske Bros, garage at Mun- 
dare suffered through a tank ex- 
plosion recently. 

Sid Nardick, garage ovirner at 
Kindersley, has been bought out 
by Tailor Bros. 

Z. Battel has sold his garage 
and implement business at Caron 
to H. A. Lilley. 

Johnston & Johnston, of Hodge- 
ville, have opened a new imple- 
ment warehouse. 

Alex. Crama has bought an in- 
terest in Elm Sheet Metal Works, 
Ltd., of Winnipeg. 

Scarfe & Stevens, garage own- 
ers at La Riviere are succeeded 
by Scarfe & Scales. 

The partnership of Petrie & 
Hyde, garage owners at Kelliher, 
has been dissolved. 

H. Gositick is reported to be 
selling out his machinery and 
auto shop at 'Manor. 

George A. Dulmage has dis- 
continued his farm iniplement 
business at Yorkton. 

R. Biswitherick, garage owner 
at Sidney, is succeeded by his son, 
Dougald Biswitherick. 

M. Kellarman, farm machinery 
dealer at Bruno, has sold out to 
Tengenkamp & Matte. 



McBeath & Bell are succeeded 
at Portage la Prairie by the Por- 
tage Garage Company. 

W. G. Smewing, of Craven, has 
added a garage and repair shop to 
his business in that town. 

The Conquest Garage & Ma- 
chine Shop, of Conquest, has 
been sold ^to M. Bennett. 

Setters Ltd., implement, auto 
and hardware merchants at Kam- 
sack, have been burnt out. 

The South Hill Vulcanizing 
Works, of Moose Jaw, have ad- 
mitted a partner in the business. 

Gulak Bros, machinery dealers 
at Regina, are contemplating dis- 
continuing business at thait point. 

E. T. Syvindson, machinist & 
implement dealer at Langruth, 
has sold his garage in that town. 

Steve Boyka has commenced in 
the automobile business at Haf- 
ford, and S. Cloakley at Etting- 
ton. 

A report from Marieapolis 
states that Jos. Allard is now 
dealing in implements in that 
town. 

H. F. McKenzie has bought 
out W. H. Cooper's garage and 
implement business at High 
River. 

Morrison & Graham,, of Brad- 
wardine, are succeeded in the 
implement business by Graham & 
Wolf. 

Barker Bros. & Co., of Peace 
River, haye sold out their auto 
and implement business in that 
centre. 



Dealers : Write at Once for Pre-War 
Price on the Self -Starting 

" HAFA-HORS " ENGINES 



Step on the Pedal 
and it Starts ! 



Because you sell heavy en- 
gines, don't overlook the sales 
field for the Hafa-Hors — a little 
helper for little jobs. An 
easily started Yz H.P. engine 
that is the right size and power 
for running cream separators, 
washers, churns, pumps, grain 
graders, grindstones, water- 
supply systems, etc. Show the 
farm woman this engine and 
you sell it. ' 




A Profit-Maker at the Price weJQuote 

Any woman or child can start it instantly by simply stepping on the pedal. 
An ideal engine for home or barn use. Simple, dependable. Always ready to run. 
Perfect speed control. Weighs only 62 pounds. Costs less than 3 cents an hour to 
operate. Pulleys can be changed in a moment. We ship from stock at once. Get a 
Hafa-Hors on your floor. The demand will surprise you. 

■ DON'T DELAY— GET IN ON THIS OFFER 

Elgini Gas Motor jiCo. Ltd. 

1425 WHYTE AVE. ^ :-: WINNIPEG, MAN. 



T. A. Anderson, manager of 
the American Separator Co., 
spent a few days in Minneapolis 
recently. 

H. C. Hastings, farm mach- 
inery dealer at Rouleau, is suc- 
ceeded by the Hastings Imple- 
ment Co. 

D. Mcleod, implement and gar- 
age dealer at Webb, has rented 
his garage business to Ross & 
Lacourse. 

Aime Lavack has bought out 
the machinery and insurance 
business of G. Demouchel, at Lac 
Du Bomiet. 

Dykeman, Gordon & Co., im- 
plement and hardware dealers at 
Benito, are succeeded by Dyke- 
man & Gibbens. 

The partnership of Gordon & 
Girard, garage and implement 
dealers at Bowsman River, is re- 
ported dissolved. 

Grovum & Sorestead have 
opened a garage at Buchanan, 
and Pinkney & Dic.kson an auto 
concern at Carlyle. 

Johnstone Bros., livery and gai- 
age owners at Minitonas, have 
dissolved partnership, R. John- 
stone is continuing. 

Portage la Prairie has a new 
company dealing exclusively in 
tractors. The firm na,me is Bray, 
McGuaig & Harper. 

Blue Bird Corp., Ltd., washing 
machine manufacturers are clos- 
ing their offices in the Montreal 
Trust Bldg., Winnipeg. 

J. A. Levesque, of Dollard, has 
commenced a garage, while Bar- 
tel Bros., of Drake, have entered 
the automobile, business. 

V. H. Morris of Bowden is suc- 



ceeded in his garage business by 
V. H. Shenfield, and Carl Christ- 
enson at Irma by M. K. McLeod. 

Wyberg & Johnson have open- 
ed a garage at Metiskow, while 
W. J. Austin has commenced at 
Ranfurly in the automobile busi- 



ness. 



J. F. Pirie has purchased the 
Newport Carriage and Wagon 
Works, at Whitby, Ont., from 
J. T. Newport, who is giving up 
business. 

P. J. Grout, manager of- the 
Twin City Separator Co., was a 
recent business visitor to the 
Minneapolis headquarters of his 
company. 

B. A. Hines, export sales man- 
ager for the Oliver Chilled Plow 
Works, South Bend, Ind., was a 
■ recent business visitor to Winni- 
peg and Regina. 

F. J. Weed, manager of the 
De Laval Company Ltd., Winni- 
peg spent a few days at the 
Edmonton branch of the com- 
pany early in the month. 

J. E. Kinley has closed his 
machinery shop a\t Cartwright, 
also Mooney & Robinson is the 
report. J. Robinson continues at 
this point, however. 

William and John Morton have 
joined partnership in an imple- 
ment, automobile and oil business 
at Elphinstone and will operate 
under the heading of Morton 
Bros. 

Four new garage firms in Sas- 
katchewan are Kearney & Brad- 
ley, at Loreburn ; Hill & Graham, 
at Riceton; Vayta Bros., at 
Sceptre, and A. Erickson, at 
Scotsguard. 

J. P Ri'tchie, manager of the 




VAN SLYKE BREAKING PLOW 

Latest improved 1921 model (20-in.). 
Also made as a horse plow. 

A Western Plow Built in the West for the Western Farmer 

Strong and powerful, lots of clearance, easy draft, cutting an extremely 
flat unbroken furrow, completely buries any brush. Will do as good work 
in either brush or prairie. 

OVER 1,400 IN USE TO-DAY, ASK ANY USER. 



ATTRACTIVE PROPOSITION FOR AGENTS 



WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 



THE EDMONTON IRON WORKS, Ltd. 



EDMONTON, ALTA. 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



19 



2222 




Toronto 




Globe 




April 22nd 





■i mm 



MANY ON THE 
WATER WAGON 
FEEL BETTER OFF 



COPYRIGHT 1917 



W MITC (tost OASOUHt 



in tlve^f;^ adopt- 

-Those not ^ 
us." ^f ^de^ *^' 'Static 

, or "^^ U B« 



Jl 




TORONTO 
"GLOBE" 

COMMENTS ON 



BOY AND SLATE SIGN 



THE papers are quoting En-ar-co epigrams 
in box rules on tlieir front pages. The 
people are talking. Everybody is watch- 
ing those Big Boy and Slate Signs in front 
of Garages, Service Stations and Stores all over 
the country. 

Have this Attention 
Directed Your Way 

This sign and epigram service of ours is open 
to you. It's the most novel eye-catcher ever 
produced. And when it gets people looking 
your way — they start coming your way. 



Now, you want this sign. We want to tell you how easy you 
can get it, how we work out new epigrams for you to put on it 
every other day ; how successful it has been for other dealers. 
This information will only cost you the price of a postage 
stamp. And it won't obligate you one bit. So why not, right 
now, fill in this coupon (it's put here for your convenience) 
and slip it in the mail to-night, addressed to our branch nearest 
you? 

Canadian Oil Companies 

LIMITED 

Toronto, London, Montreal, Quebec, St. John, Halifax, 
Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary. 



CANADIAN OIL COMPANIES, LIMITED 



Nearest Branch 



Tell me, without obligation, how I can secure your 
and Slate Sign, and Epigram Service. 



'Boy 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 



C.F.I. 6 



20 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 




Aakfor catalog 138 
and our special 
dealer propotilion 



Sell the 
Separator 
That Possesses 
the Strongest 
Talking Points 

—that gives you the quick- 
turnover and makes your 
customers satisfied. 

Here is the separator that has more selling fea- 
tures than all other separators combined; that height- 
^ ens your good reputation, that helps you sell others 
and that slays sold. 

\^iKiNr 
^ CREAM ■ 1 

skims to perfection, guaranteed to skim to 1-100 of one 
percent. It has the straight disc, with a longer skimming 
surface than any other type; discs that never —f 
become separated, are easy to clean. Every 
part of the separator is easy to handle; no 
back-breaking drudgery; no remorse at the 
mere ihoughli of cleaning every day. Nothing 
to get out of order, nothing to worry the user 
or you about. It performs beautifully— a child 
can operate it. It does its work day in and day 
out, year in and year out. 
If you are a live dealer, by all means get back 
of our broad guage plan of selling and serving 
to your customers; handle this VIKING and 
real service. 

Write now for our liberal proposi- 
tion and begin at once to control the 
separator business in your territory. 

Swedish Separator Co. 

Dept. 50 William and McPhillips St. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 




Mention Canadian Farm Implements when writing Advertisers. 
It will help identify you. 



John Watson Mfg. Co., Winni- 
peg, states that the factory is 
very busy turning out their line 
of feed cutters to take care of the 
fall demand. 

R. McKenzie, manager of the 
McLaughlin Motor Co., Winni- 
peg, recently returned from a 
A'isit to the head office and fac- 
tories of the organization at 
Oshawa, Ont. 

P. L. Miller, formerly block 
man at the North Bat'tleford 
branch of the International Har- 
vester Co., has been appointed 
assistant manager of the Estevan 
branch of the company. 

C. F. Nelson, formerly with the 
Big Four Gas Traction Co., and 
later with 'the Gray Tractor Co., 
has been appointed superintend- 
ent of the Reed Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

The garage business at Mile- 
stone formerly conducted by F. 
W. Nicholas has been taken over 
by W. Anderson and H. Hanson. 
The farm machinery end of the 
business is still retained by Mr. 
Nicholas. 

W .A .Morris, E. M. Metcalfe 
and W. J. McCuaig have formed 
the Poritage Garage Co., at Port- 
age la Prairie. The company will 
operate as automobile dealers and 
will handle oils, tractors and 
threshers. 

E. T. Wright, International 
dealer at Areola, has remodelled 
his warehouse, added a show- 




Gilt Edge, 650-ft. 
Gold Leaf, 600-ft. 
Silver Leaf, 550-ft. 
Maple Leaf, 500-ft. 



Specify Your Requirements for 

Brantford Binder Twine 

Made by an All-Canadian Company that has had no tariff 
protection since 1896. Our production and sales in 17 
years have increased from 80 tons per year to over 10,000 tons. 
We submit these facts as proof of our exceptional quality. 

Made in Canada for Canadian Farmers 



Advise your customers to specify for their requirements of Brantf ord Binder Twine AT ONCE 

Uniformity, Length, Strength, Firmness and Finish 

Our Mills are equipped with the most modern machinery 
and we use the highest grades of Fibres obtainable. 

All our Twines are submitted to a special preservative 
treatment to make them insect-proof. 

Don't delay, send you order to our Western Office 

^•■^ Brantf ord Cordage Company Limited 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 
Western Canadian Office: 162 Princess Street, Winnipeg, Man. 

Largest Manufacturers of Binder Twine in the British Empire 




room, office and repair room, and 
now has one of the finest retail 
implement warehouses in West- 
ern Canada. 

D. J. Beatty, for some time 
advertising manager of 'the 
Northern Electric Co., Montreal, 
has resigned to go into partner- 
ship with G. L. MacGillivray in 
the G. L. MacGillivray & Co., 
Ltd., Montreal. 

A. C. Williams, formerly with 
the Empire Cream Separator Co., 
as travelling salesman, is now 
representing the Macartney Milk- 
ing Machine Company, of 
Ottawa, and is covering the terri- 
tory from Toronto west. 

The Coutts Machinery Co., 
Edmonton, since its establish- 
ment reports good business. The 
owners are T. H. and W. J. 
Coutts, and they state that they 
are now adding equipment 'to 
their machine shop' to turn out a 
line including small saws, grain 
crushers, etc. 

Jos. A. Cormier, well known 
farm implement and Ford dealer 
at La Salle, Man., is opening a 
fine new garage. The new build- 
ing will be 40x72 feet, with plate 
glass front. Accommodation is 
provided for 20 cars. At the rear 
end will be the tr-actor and auto 
hospital. This is the first garage 
in Newdale. 

Garages have been opened up 
in many towns recently. Some 
of the new members of the trade 
are W. A. Fogg, at Birnie ; Free- 
born Bros., at Harte; Transcona 
Garage, at Transcona ; Varty & 
Wessert, of Eatonia ; John De 
Cattin, of St. Gregor; S .K. 
Farquharson, of Athabasca; and 
Carlson Bros., of Bindless. 

Donald M. Spaidal, who was 
manager of the Canadian branch 
of General Motors Acceptance 
Corp., which he opened in 1919, 
has been appointed vice-president 
and general manager of the said 
corporation at New York. Before 
going with General Motors, Mr. 
Spaidal was head of the Canada 
Carriage Co., Broclkville, Ont. 

Weymouth Represents Link 
Manufacturing Company 



H. E. Weymouth, a member of 
the sales force of the Link Mfg. 
Company of Kansas City, arrived 
in Winnipeg on his way to Port- 
age la Prairie where he will take 
up a permanent position as one- 
of the travelling salesmen for the 
Canadian branch o-f the business. 
H. C .Wallace, manager of the 
Portage la Prairie branch, states 
that Mr. Weymouth will spend 
most of his time in Saskatchewan, 
calling on the trade and attending 
conventions and salesmen's meet- 
ings which will probably be in- 
stituted as a part of their sales 
work. 



June, 1921 



Canadian Farm Implements 



21 











V 



E 




iii<iiiiijiir^ifi;!igsis^sssiss;^. 



Quality and Value make 
Ideal Fence the most Profit- 
able Line you could Handle 

Everywhere you go in Canada you will see Ideal Fence — 
along the railway and highways, around farms, around 
town and city homes and parks. Wherever lasting fence 
protection is required Ideal is chosen, because every test 
proves it to be the strongest and best fence made, yet it 
sells for no more than ordinary fence. 

We are backing Ideal quality and worth with a strong 
advertising campaign, which is having beneficial results for 
Ideal Fence dealers. We offer you the same co-operation. 

Write for our attractive Dealer Proposition 

Ideal Fence and Spring Company of Canada, Limited 

Windsor, Ontario Winnipeg, Manitoba 



STOPS THE TRACTOR 
DOES NOT UNCOUPLE 
FROM THE LOAD. 




PfAtlCTfl^^CTiTROLllER 
SAFETY HITCH AND 

SHOCK ABSORBER 



A Line that Makes 
Money for Dealers 

The Belcher 
Tractor Hitch 

Absolutely guaranteed to pre- 
vent breakages of tractor or 
implement. It instantaneously 
disconnects the clutch. Adjust- 
able while tractor is in motion. 
We show Style "A" for TITAN 
and similar H.P. Engines. Price, 

$45.00 F.O.B. WINNIPEG 

25 PER CENT DISCOUNT 
TO DEALERS 



In case a complete hitch is not required we can supply guaranteed, highest 
grade 

Shock Absorbing Steel Compression 
Springs for Tractor Use, as follows: 

4,000-lb. Capacity (for 10 H.P. drawbar engines) $ 6.00 

5,000-lb. Capacity (for 12 H.P. drawbar engines) 8.00 

6,000-lb. Capacity (for 15 H.P. drawbar engines) 9.00 

8,000-lb. Capacity (for 17-18 H.P. drawbar engines) 11.00 

10,000-lb. Capacity (for 20 H.P. and up drawbar engines). 12.50 

Drawbars to fit above, $4.00 per pair. All prices are F.O.B. Winnipeg; 
Cash with order. Dealers, 25 per cent off list prices on both springs and 
hitch. Write at once to 

FRED. P. BELCHER 

240 Grain Exchange Winnipeg, Man. 




A Power Farming Message 
to the Canadian Trade 



wm 



|N THE BROAD, level farms of West- 
ern Canada, the trend towards power 
farming will take another step forward 
this year. Dependable tractor power will be 
needed for summer fallowing, threshing, fall plowing 
and a variety of other work. Now is the time to 
convince your prospects that the tractor makes farm- 
ing more profitable. Get them started in time for the 
harvest work. 

The reduction in the prices of Titan 10-20 and 
International 15-30 Tractors makes them 
especially good values right now. You can talk rock-bot- 
tom prices, better farming through deeper plowing and 
more thorough tillage, getting work done on time in the 
short Canadian working season, the saving of labor 
and the economy over horses even at lower feed prices. 

Take these points up with your prospects. When 
you sell a Titan 10-20 or International 
15-30, with their unexcelled records for dependable 
work you are rendering a distinct service to 3^our sec- 
tion — and it means profit to you. 



CASH PRICES F.O.B. 

FOLLOWING POINTS TIT.\N 10-20 

Winnipeg, Man. $1,250 

Brandon, Man. 1,250 

Regina, Sask. 1,280 

Estevan, Sask. 1,280 

Yorkton, Sask. 1,280 

North Battleford, Sask. 1,300 

Saskatoon, Sask. 1,300 

Calgary, Alta. 1,325 

Edmonton, Alta. 1,325 

Lethbridge, Alta. 1,325 



INTERNATION.\L 
15-30 



$2,360 
2,360 

2,410 
2,410 
2,410 

2,445 
2,445 

2,485 
2,485 
2,485 



Reasonable terms can be arranged for buyers 
who cannot pay cash in full. 

Our advertising to the farmer is interesting him in 
power farming. You are the personal representative 
to turn this interest into sales. Let's work together. 

See the Blockman for further information and sales helps 

International Harvester Company 

OF CANADA ltd. 

HAMILTON, CANADA 

BRANCH HOUSES; Brandon, Winnipeg, Man.: Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge, 
Alta.; Estevas, N. Battleford, Regina, Saskatoon, Yorkton, Sask, 



22 



Canadian Farm Implements 



June, 1921 



Bell Leaves Cleveland 
Organization 



W. G. Bell has resigned as 
president of the Cleveland Trac- 
tor Co. of Canada to become 
director of sales of Gray-Dort 
Motors, Limited, of Chatham. 
Mr. Bell brings to his new duties 
a particularl)^ extensive auto- 
motive experience. 

Born at London, Ont., Mr. 
Bell entered the auto business in 
Chicago some eighteen years ago. 
In 1906 he formed the Reo Motor 
Car Co., and five years later was 
made Canadian sales manager. 
In 1913 he joined the S'tudebaker 
Corporation, Walkerville,, being 

■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiB 
i ■ . I 

I How is Your Stock of | 

I Bill Heads and | 
I Letter Heads? | 

I Is it running pretty low? | 

I If so write us and find j 
I out what is most up-to- | 
I date in this line. | 

I We will let you have all | 
I information promptly. | 

I The OTOVEL CO. Ltd. | 



appointed sales manager of that 
company in 1918. In that year 
he became president and manag- 
ing director of the Cleveland 
Tractor Co. of Canada, Windsor, 
Ont. 



A New Stooker Company 



at $23,000,000. The values for 
land and buildings and imple- 
ments are conservative estimates 
based upon the census returns of 
19U and 19i6. Frtt-h data will 
be available after the taking of 
the census. 



Business is Still There 



We note 'that R. J. McGivern 
& Co., Edmonton are now offer- 
ing- stock in the Heart Stooker 
Company of that city. Forty 
J:housand shares are being placed. 
It is stated by the stooker con- 
cern 'that this machine is attached 
to the binder, receiving the grain 
direct. It is claimed to eliminate 
all hand stooking and to equalize 
side draft in the binder. This 
machine has been tested out and 
is said to have done very satis- 
factory work. 



Truck Company Expands 



The National Steel Car Corpor- 
ation, Limited, of Hamilton, Ont., 
itook over the plants and effects 
of the National Steel Car Corpor- 
ation, Limited, as a going con- 
cern, and- is now operating the 
business under the title of the 
National Steel Car Corporation, 
Limited, The National Steel Car 
Company, Limited, has changed 
its corporate name to that of the 
Hamilton Car Company, Limited. 



A Poison Bait Distributor 



Canada's Agricultural Wealth 



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A Complete Printing Service | 

I Bannatyne Ave. WINNIPEG 1 
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If to the estimated value of 
agricultural production in 1920, 
viz., $1,946,648,000, be added 
$4,232,588,000 for land and build- 
ings, $391,669,000 for implements, 
and $1,041,246,000 for farm live 
stock, the total estimated agri- 
cultural wealth of the Dominion 
of Canada for 1920 amounts 
to $7,612,151,000. Misce